Monday, 1 January 2018

(315) Bagshawe of Wormhill Hall and Oakes Park

Bagshawe of Wormhill and Oakes
The Bagshawes have owned the manor of Wormhill since the middle of the 15th century, but the present Wormhill Hall was built in 1697 for Adam Bagshawe (1646-1723), the eighth and youngest son of William Bagshawe of Hucklow, who received this estate as his patrimony. Adam married Alice, the heiress of the Torr family of Goosehill Hall, Castleton, who brought him that estate as well, and both their initials appear on the datestone of the new house at Wormhill, even though Alice had been dead for more than a decade when it was constructed.

When Adam Bagshawe died in 1723, he seems to have left Wormhill to his eldest son, Adam Bagshawe (1673-1729) and Goosehill Hall to his second son, Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750), who in 1715 had also inherited Oakes Park (alias The Oakes) at Norton near Sheffield in right of his wife. When Adam junior died a few years after his father, Richard acquired Wormhill too. At some point, Richard seems also to have inherited a fourth property: Coates Hall at Barnoldswick (Yorks WR), where there was a double-pile gabled manor house of about 1700. 
Coates Hall, Barnoldswick. Image: Dr. Neil Clifton. Some rights reserved.
At his death, Richard divided his property between his surviving sons. The eldest, Richard Bagshawe (1705-76) received Oakes Park; William Bagshawe (1713-85) got Coates Hall; and John Bagshawe (1715-92), the youngest, received Wormhill Hall and Goosehill. Of the three sons, only Richard married, and he had no children, so as the brothers died, the estates once again came together. John had no close male relatives, and chose as his heir the second son of his cousin, Col. Samuel Bagshawe of Ford Hall. This was John Bagshawe (1758-1801), a young barrister, who was invited to live with his benefactor at Wormhill Hall in 1785 in order to learn about the estate and its management before entering on his responsibilities. The elder John Bagshawe's will made the younger John a tenant for life in the estate rather than the outright owner, and contained the rather unusual provision that if John married and produced a family he should have power to dispose of the estate by his own will, but not otherwise. In the event, the younger John never married, and therefore at his death the estate passed to the senior male descendant of the elder John's sister Ellen (1710-60), who was Dr. William Chambers Darling (1771-1832), a physician practising at Brigg in Lincolnshire. As a condition of the inheritance, Darling was obliged to change his name to Bagshawe, which he did in 1801. He threw himself into the management of his estates and to the public responsibilities attached to his position, and in 1805-06 was High Sheriff of Derbyshire. At the end of his shrievalty year he was knighted, perhaps on the occasion of his presenting a loyal address from the county to the king, although I can find no evidence of this. In 1810-12 he undertook a remodelling of Oakes Park, and there was further work on the house in the 1820s and 1830s, although by then he had handed over Oakes Park to his eldest son.

Sir William Chambers Bagshawe produced an enormous family of nineteen children, fourteen of whom survived to adulthood. Perhaps because there were too many adult sons (eight outlived their father) to achieve an equitable division, he did not divide his property between them, but bequeathed it all to his eldest son, William John Bagshawe (1793-1851), and concentrated on establishing the younger sons in careers: three went into the church; one to the law; two to the army; and one to medicine. William John Bagshawe also trained as a barrister, and this training combined with a sense of public duty and a punctilious approach to official business meant he was much in demand in local administration. In particular, he was the Chairman of the Sheffield Poor Law Guardians for fifteen years after the new poor law was introduced in 1836, and was a JP for both Yorkshire and Derbyshire. Like many improving Victorian landlords, he was keen to support his tenants in improving farming practices, and he founded the Norton Agricultural Society (later Farmers Club) to introduce his tenants to new ways. When he died in 1851, the estate passed to his eldest son, William Leonard Gill Bagshawe (1828-54), who was just down from Cambridge, where he had been a rowing blue. The young owner found he had a problem with poachers systematically taking salmon from his fishing on the River Wye and in a rather hot-blooded way decided to gather a group of his friends and keepers to ambush and capture the poachers. Unfortunately on the night chosen, the poachers proved to be present in much greater numbers than he had bargained for, and despite hastily summoned reinforcements, the poachers made a fight of it and young William's skull was fractured. He was taken back to Wormhill Hall but died soon afterwards. The Wormhill and Oakes estates therefore passed to his younger brother, Francis Westby Bagshawe (1832-96), who like his father came to play a leading role in local administration. He sold Coates Hall at Barnoldswick in 1883.

Sadly, when Francis Westby Bagshawe died in 1896 he had no sons, and his property passed to his elder daughter, (Beatrice) Muriel Westby Bagshawe (1876-1966). She married in 1907 Henry Bradshaw-Isherwood (1868-1940) - a landowner in Cheshire and Derbyshire, and the uncle of Anglo-American novelist, Christopher Isherwood - but the marriage was not a success. The couple had no children and finally parted in 1925. At the beginning of their marriage they had legally taken the surname Bradshaw-Isherwood-Bagshawe, but this was such an un-euphonious mouthful that it was commonly abbreviated to Bagshawe-Isherwood, and that was the name by which Muriel continued to be known until her death; her husband reverted to his original name after 1925. Muriel's unmarried younger sister died in 1955 and her heir then became her first cousin once removed, Thornber Bagshawe (1911-96), who restored and occupied Wormhill Hall in the late 1950s. In 1963 she made over the Oakes and Wormhill estates to him, and he and his wife then restored The Oakes and made it their home. In the 1970s it was open to the public on a regular basis. The family came to feel, however, that the rapid expansion of Sheffield was encroaching too much on Oakes Park. There was a rising tide of trespass, criminal damage and vandalism on the estate, and the decision of Sheffield City Council to build a new dual carriageway through the middle of the park led them to sell the house and contents in the 1980s and retreat to Wormhill Hall. After ten years of neglect and serious vandalism, Oakes Park has been restored by the charitable trust which now owns it; and the family has been able to concentrate its resources on Wormhill, which has now been in their possession for more than 550 years.

Wormhill Hall, Derbyshire

The Bagshawes have owned Wormhill since they bought it from the heirs of Roger Foljambe in about 1449; their original manor house was probably located at Old Hall Farm. The present house is a pleasingly formal, symmetrical, two-storey H-shaped stone house, approached by a semicircular flight of steps from a front forecourt that preserves its gatepiers with ball finials and 18th century ironwork balustrades. It is dated 1697 on a rainwater head, and was built for Adam Bagshawe of Castleton, although it has been suggested that the east wing may contain earlier work. The design has points of similarity with Bagshaw Hall in Bakewell (built in 1684 for a cousin of the builder of Wormhill), and could be by the same mason. 
Wormhill Hall: entrance front.

The west-facing entrance front has two-bay gabled wings with quoins at the angles and a three-bay centre with a blind parapet and a segmental pediment over the central doorcase. The windows are all two-light mullioned windows under proper cornices connected by flat string courses. The desire for symmetry has been taken sufficiently seriously to ensure a symmetrical disposition of the chimneystacks. At the rear, however, the house has an off-centre staircase tower, and there is a long low service wing attached on the north. Inside, the porch gives access to a central entrance hall with a passageway along the back leading to the staircase. The interior seems to have been improved in the 18th century, from which time dates some bolection-moulded panelling and the fine staircase with turned balusters; there are also a couple of later 18th century chimneypieces. The house was let for much of the 19th and 20th centuries, until the family restored it in the 1950s. A further restoration was undertaken in the 1980s when they returned to live here after selling Oakes Park. 

Descent: Nicholas Bagshawe (fl. 1449)... William Bagshawe (1598-1669); to youngest son, Adam Bagshawe (1646-1723); to son, Adam Bagshawe (1673-1729); to brother, Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750); to youngest son, John Bagshawe (1715-92); to kinsman, John Bagshawe (1758-1801); to kinsman, Sir William Chambers Darling (later Bagshawe) (1771-1832), kt.; to son, William John Bagshawe (1793-1851); to son, William Leonard Gill Bagshawe (1828-54); to brother, Francis Westby Bagshawe (1832-96); to daughter, Beatrice Muriel Westby Bagshawe (1876-1966), wife of Henry Bradshaw-Isherwood (later Bradshaw-Isherwood-Bagshawe); given 1963 to first cousin once removed, Thornber Bagshawe (1911-96); to son, Timothy John Bagshawe (b. 1951). 

Oakes Park, Norton, Derbyshire (later Yorkshire WR)

There has been a house on this site since at least 1468, but nothing seems to be known about it prior to a complete rebuilding for John Lee in c.1668-70. That produced the earliest part of the present house, which now has a regular and almost entirely symmetrical main south front of nine bays and two-and-a-half storeys. The straightforward appearance of this elevation masks, however, a complex history, with further phases of work in c.1722; c.1750, 1811 and 1827, and although these are relatively well dated, there is a measure of disagreement about what was done when. It is also rather surprising to find Pilkington describing the house in 1789 as 'a large and ancient mansion', when I imagine its appearance was much as today. 


Oakes Park: the south-facing main front. The longer windows of the two-storey east elevation can just be seen on the right.

The original building for John Lee was taxed on twelve hearths in 1670, and probably corresponds to the left-hand five bays of the main front, and the four-bay return to the west; no doubt originally this block had gables and mullioned windows. The original stable block and office range were extended in 1722 for Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750), who inherited the house in right of his wife in 1715. He also did some work inside the house, installing the bolection-moulded fireplace in the entrance hall, made of a grey Derbyshire marble with fossil inclusions; the oak dog-leg staircase with umbrello-balusters; and the fine panelling with giant pilasters in the drawing room and the parlour behind it.


Oakes Park: drawing room of c.1730.
The next stage of development seems to have been undertaken by Richard Bagshawe junior (d. 1776), who inherited in 1750. He added the four right-hand bays of the south front, and the shallower return to the east, and brought the whole house up to date with sash windows in plain surrounds and a coped parapet in lieu of the original gables. He must have created new interiors in the eastern part of the house too, but these have all been lost in later changes. In 1801 the house passed to Sir William Chambers Darling (1771-1832), kt., who took the additional name Bagshawe, and he initiated further work. He perhaps first approached William Lindley (1739-1818) of Doncaster, who with his partner John Woodhead (d. c.1838) submitted plans for a more ambitious remodelling than was undertaken, before turning to Joseph Badger (1738-1817) of Sheffield, whose work at Renishaw Hall (Derbys), completed by 1808, he may have seen and approved. Badger remodelled the eastern part of the house on two storeys in place of the original three, but left in place the original windows on the main front as blind windows, so as to preserve the symmetry. 


Oakes Park: dining room decorated by Joseph Badger, 1811.

Badger's interiors bear a marked resemblance to his work at Renishaw. To the right of the hall is an ante-room with Adam-style plasterwork, then a fine dining room with neo-classical plasterwork and a northern apse with an elliptical arch and fluted Ionic pilasters. The move from three storeys to two required the installation of a new staircase by Badger with a glazed dome and cast-iron balusters, which led up to a music room on the first floor with a Doric screen. Further work, which it is now difficult to identify (apart from a new service turret at the north-west corner), was carried out in 1827 by John Woodhead and his partner William Hurst (1787-1844), and they also designed and built new lodges for the estate in 1834, by which time Sir William's son, William Bagshawe, had taken over the house. At the same as work on remodelling the house was going on, there were alterations to the gardens too. The sculptor Sir Francis Chantrey, who grew up on the estate and first visited the house as a small boy delivering milk, is said to have designed the south terrace, and he was obviously a friend of the family as his funeral in 1841 was conducted from the house. As far as I can establish there is no foundation for the statement that John Nash laid out the park, although the grounds were obviously landscaped at some point, including the creation of a lake.

After he acquired Oakes Park in 1963, Thornber Bagshawe undertook a programme of repairs and modernisation, which allowed him to move into the house in 1966. It was subsequently opened to the public on a regular basis in the 1970s. But with the transfer of the Norton area from Derbyshire to the City of Sheffield in 1967, the family felt increasingly threatened by the relentless march of huge housing estates towards the park, with an accompanying increase in vandalism, trespass and criminal damage. The building of a new ring road through the middle of the estate with street lights that shone into almost every room of the house at night was the final straw, and in 1985 the house and some of the contents were sold, and the family retreated to Wormhill Hall. After they left, Oakes Park came into the hands of a building contractor who converted the service buildings at the rear to housing, but left the main building unoccupied. As a consequence it fell prey to the vandalism the Bagshawes had resisted for so long, and at one point all the blind windows on the right-hand side of the main front had not only been broken but had had their frames pulled out. The house was rescued after it was acquired in 1998 by the Oakes Trust, which operates the main part of the house as a Christian holiday centre for children. They carried out extensive restoration works in 1998-2000 and 2006-15, and have also cleared the lake, which had silted up.

Descent: John Lee (fl. 1668); sold 1675 to Joseph Morewood (1649-1714); sold 1680 to Henry Gill (d. 1715); to daughter, wife of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750); to son, Richard Bagshawe (1705-76); to brother, William Bagshawe (1713-85); to brother, John Bagshawe (1715-92); to kinsman, John Bagshawe (1758-1801); to kinsman, Sir William Chambers Darling (later Bagshawe) (1771-1832), kt.; to son, William John Bagshawe (1793-1851); to son, William Leonard Gill Bagshawe (1828-54); to brother, Francis Westby Bagshawe (1832-96); to daughter, Beatrice Muriel Westby Bagshawe (1876-1966), , wife of Henry Bradshaw-Isherwood (later Bradshaw-Isherwood-Bagshawe); given 1963 to first cousin once removed, Thornber Bagshawe (1911-96), who sold 1987 to Henry Boot plc; sold 1987 to a private building contractor, who sold 1998 to The Oakes Trust.


Bagshawe family of Wormhill Hall and Oakes Park



Bagshawe, Adam (1646-1723). Eighth and youngest son of William Bagshawe (1598-1669) of Hucklow [for whom see my previous post] and his first wife Jane (d. 1661), daughter of Ralph Oldfield of Litton (Derbys), baptised 18 November 1646. An officer of the Royal Household as Third Groom Porter of the Gate, 1715-20 and Second Groom Porter of the Gate, 1720-24. He married, 19 September 1670, Alice (d. 1685), daughter and heiress of Richard Torr of Goosehill Hall, Castleton (Derbys), and had issue:
(1) Susannah Bagshawe (1672-1716), born 1 January 1671/2; married Richard Heathcote of Taxall Hall (Cheshire) and had issue; died 12 March 1716;
(2) Adam Bagshawe (1673-1729), born 11 July 1673; married 1st, 24 October 1695, Anne (d. 1707), daughter of Paul Webster of Chesterfield (Derbys); married 2nd, 3 March 1709, Margaret (1665-1735), daughter and heiress of Thomas Nuttall of Tottington Hall (Lancs), and had issue one son (who died in infancy) and one daughter; died 21 May and was buried at Wormhill, 24 May 1729; will proved 14 October 1729;
(3) Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) (q.v.);
(4) Elizabeth Bagshawe (1676-1752), born 9 October 1676 and baptised 9 February 1676/7; married, 9 December 1701, Thomas Birtles of Birtles Hall (Cheshire) and had issue one daughter; died July 1752;
(5) William Bagshawe (1679-1751), born 5 December and baptised at Wormhill, 11 December 1679; died unmarried and was buried at Wormhill, 23 September 1751;
(6) John Bagshawe (1681-1737), born 26 March and baptised at Wormhill, 28 March 1681; British Consul at Genoa (Italy), 1724-37, but described by Lord Essex as 'horridly stupid and dull'; died unmarried, October 1737.
He inherited Wormhill Hall from his father in 1669 and rebuilt it in 1697. He also acquired Goosehill Hall in right of his wife.
He was buried at Tideswell, 1 January 1723/4; his will was proved 3 June 1724. His wife died 20 August and was buried at Tideswell, 31 August 1685.

Bagshawe, Richard (1675-1750). Eldest son of Adam Bagshawe (1646-1723) of Wormhill Hall and his wife Alice, daughter and heiress of Richard Torr of Goosehill Hall, Castleton (Derbys), born 25 February and baptised at Wormhill, 14 March 1674/75. JP and DL for Derbyshire; High Sheriff of Derbyshire, 1721. He married, 31 August 1699 at Dronfield (Derbys), Elizabeth (1676-1747), daughter and heiress of Henry Gill DL of Oakes Park, Norton near Sheffield, and had issue:
(1) Henry Bagshawe (1700-01), born 10 August and baptised at Castleton, 22 August 1700; died in infancy, 11 September and buried at Norton, 13 September 1701;
(2) Ursula Bagshawe (1703-04), born at Oakes Park, 26 March and baptised at Norton, 7 April 1703; died in infancy, 6 January 1703/4 and was buried at Norton;
(3) Richard Bagshawe (1705-76) (q.v.);
(4) Elizabeth Bagshawe (1706-78), born at Goosehill Hall, 23 November and baptised at Castleton, 1 December 1706; died unmarried at Oakes Park and was buried at Norton, 22 December 1778;
(5) Adam Bagshawe (1707-25), born at Goosehill Hall, 11 December and baptised at Castleton, 25 December 1707; died unmarried in London, 19 September and was buried at Norton, 26 September 1725;
(6) Gill Bagshawe (b. & d. 1709), born at Goosehill Hall, 16 January and baptised at Castleton, 23 January 1708/9; died in infancy, 30 January and was buried at Castleton, 5 February 1708/9;
(7) twin, Alicia Bagshawe (1710-37), born at Goosehill Hall, 7 April and baptised at Castleton, 13 April 1710; married, 17 October 1734, John Fell (d. 1762) of Attercliffe (Yorks WR), but had no issue; died 8 August 1737 and was buried in Sheffield Cathedral;
(8) twin, Ellen Bagshawe (1710-60) (q.v.);
(9) Mary Bagshawe (1712-75), born at Oakes Park, 16 April and baptised at Norton, 8 May 1712; married, 30 May 1748, John Hayworth (d. 1785) of Manchester, and had issue one daughter; died 13 January 1775 and was buried in Byron Chapel at Manchester Collegiate church;
(10) William Bagshawe (1713-85) (q.v.);
(11) John Bagshawe (1715-91) (q.v.).
He lived at Goosehill Hall until he inherited Oakes Park in right of his wife in 1715. He also inherited Goosehill Hall from his father in 1723, Wormhill Hall from his elder brother in 1729 and Coates Hall, Barnoldswick (Yorks WR).
He died at Oakes Park, 9 April and was buried at Norton, 13 April 1750; will proved in the PCC, 21 June 1750. His wife died at Oakes Park, 5 December and was buried at Norton, 8 December 1747.

Bagshawe, Richard (1705-76). Eldest son of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Henry Gill of Oakes Park, Norton (Derbys), born at Goosehill Hall, Castleton, 2 April and baptised at Castleton, 11 April 1705. Educated at Chesterfield and St. John's College, Cambridge (admitted 1724). JP and DL for Derbyshire. An officer of the Royal Household as Gentleman Usher of the Privy Chamber, 1760-c.1773. He married, 11 June 1733 at Clowne (Derbys), Mary (1699-1792), daughter of John Simpson of Babworth (Notts) and Renishaw (Derbys), but had no issue.
He inherited Oakes Park from his father in 1750. At his death it passed to his next surviving brother, William.
He died at Oakes Park, 19 February, and was buried at Norton, 26 February 1776. His widow died at Renishaw, 11 January 1792, aged 92, and was buried at Norton, 18 January 1792.

Bagshawe, William (1713-85). Son of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Henry Gill of Oakes Park, Norton (Derbys), born at Goosehill Hall, 23 September and baptised at Castleton, 4 October 1713. Educated at Chesterfield, St. John's College, Cambridge (admitted 1731) and Inner Temple (admitted 1732; called to bar, 1740; bencher, 1775). Barrister-at-law. An officer of the Royal Household as Chief Clerk of Spicery, 1745-c.1760. JP and DL for Derbyshire. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Coates Hall (Yorks WR) from his father in 1750 and Oakes Park from his elder brother in 1776. At his death his property passed to his younger brother, John.
He died at Oakes Park, and was buried at Norton, 30 June 1785; his will was proved 20 December 1785.

Bagshawe, John (1715-91). Son of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Henry Gill of Oakes Park, Norton (Derbys), born at Goosehill Hall, 8 June and was baptised at Castleton, 19 June 1715. JP and DL for Derbyshire. Described as 'a forlorn and unhappy recluse', he invited his kinsman and heir to live with him in 1785. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Goosehill Hall and Wormhill Hall from his father in 1750, and Coates Hall and Oakes Park from his brother William in 1785. At his death they passed to his nearest male relative, John Bagshawe (1758-1801).
He died at Oakes Park, 14 November 1792 and was buried at Norton, 19 November 1791; his will was proved in the PCC, 26 April 1792.

Bagshawe, John (1758-1801). Third son of Col. Samuel Bagshawe (1713-62) of Ford Hall, Chapel-en-le-Frith (Derbys) [for whom see my previous post] and his wife Catherine, daughter of Sir John Caldwell, kt., of Castle Caldwell (Co. Fermanagh), born 15 May and baptised at Chinley (Derbys), 11 June 1758. Educated at Lincoln's Inn (admitted 1781; called to bar). Barrister at law. JP and DL for Derbyshire. He lived with his kinsman, John Bagshawe of Wormhill Hall, from 1785-91. In the 1790s he undertook protracted litigation against the Leeds-Liverpool Canal Co., in an effort to mitigate the effects of constructing the canal on his estate and tenants at Coates Hall, Barnoldswick. His extensive library 'of law, history, voyages, medicine and miscellanies' was sold by Sothebys over six days in June 1802. He was unmarried and without issue.
He lived mainly in London, where he had chambers in Lincoln's Inn, until 1785. He inherited Wormhill Hall, Oakes Park and Coates Hall from his first cousin once removed in 1791. At his death the estates passed to his kinsman, Sir William Chambers Darling (q.v.).
He died of consumption at the Bush Hotel, Staines (Middx), 21 August, and was buried at Staines, 29 August 1801; his will was proved in the PCC, 18 December 1801.

Bagshawe, Ellen (1710-60). Daughter of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Henry Gill of Oakes Park, Norton (Derbys), born at Goosehill Hall, 7 April and baptised at Castleton, 13 April 1710. She married, 8 March 1733 at Thorne (Yorks), Dr. William Chambers MD (c.1699-1785) of Kingston-upon-Hull (Yorks ER), and had issue including:
(1) Elizabeth Chambers (1734-99) (q.v.);
(2) Ursula Chambers (1736-38), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 7 April 1736; died in infancy and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 5 March 1737/8;
(3) Richard Chambers (b. & d. 1737), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 14 September 1737; died in infancy and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 23 November 1737;
(4) Ellen Chambers (d. 1739), buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 5 March 1738/9;
(5) Alice Chambers (1740-49), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 7 January 1740; died young and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 18 May 1749;
(6) William Chambers (1742-52), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 17 March 1742; died young and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 1 October 1752;
(7) Anne Chambers (1744-83), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 17 April 1744; died unmarried and was buried 9 August 1783;
(8) Mary Chambers (1745-46), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 11 October 1745; died in infancy and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 2 July 1746;
(9) Richard Chambers (1748-49), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 22 February 1748; died in infancy and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 11 June 1749;
(10) Ellen Chambers (1751-1819), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 3 July 1751; lived at Cottingham (Yorks ER); died unmarried and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 19 November 1819;
(11) Mary Chambers (1752-53), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 29 November 1752; died in infancy and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 8 April 1753.
She died 21 September 1760 and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull. Her husband died 8 July 1785 and was buried with his wife at Hull; his will was proved in the PCY, August 1785.

Chambers, Elizabeth (1734-99). Daughter of Dr. William Chambers MD and his wife Ellen, daughter of Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) of Oakes Park and Wormhill Hall, born 15 November and baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 18 December 1734. She married, 21 January 1765 at Holy Trinity, Hull, Ralph Darling (1731-98) of Kingston-upon-Hull (Yorks ER), apothecary and poet, son of Benjamin Darling, and had issue including:
(1) Elizabeth Darling (b. 1766), baptised at Hull, 3 February 1766;
(2) Helen Darling (b. 1769), baptised at Hull, 8 December 1769;
(3) Sir William Chambers Darling (1771-1832), kt. (q.v.);
(4) Anne Darling (1774-1847), baptised at Hull, 16 February 1774; died unmarried at Hull, Apr-Jun 1847.
She died 14 February and was buried at Hull, 17 February 1799; her will was proved at York in August 1799. Her husband was buried at Hull, 21 February 1798; his will was proved in the PCY, April 1798.


Sir William Chambers Bagshawe (1771-1832), kt.
Darling (later Bagshawe), Sir William Chambers (1771-1832), kt. Son of Ralf Darling and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. William Chambers MD, born 19 February and baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 21 March 1771. Educated at Edinburgh University (MD 1795) and Jesus College, Cambridge (matriculated 1813; MA 1814). Physician at Glanford Brigg (Lincs) until he inherited the Oakes and Wormhill estates in 1801, when he took the surname and arms of Bagshawe by royal licence. JP and DL for Derbyshire and the West Riding of Yorkshire and JP for Lancashire; High Sheriff of Derbyshire, 1805-06. He was knighted, 30 March 1806, at the end of his shrievalty. Chairman of the Buxton Baths Charity, 1827. He married, after 3 May 1792 at St Giles Cripplegate, London, Helen (1769-1843), second daughter of Nathaniel Ridgard of Gainsborough, and had issue:
(1) William John Bagshawe (1793-1851) (q.v.);
(2) Helen Maria Darling (1794-95), born 26 August 1794; died in infancy, 19 July 1795;
(3) Caroline Darling (later Bagshawe) (1795-1874), born 2 September and baptised at Bowl Alley Lane Presbyterian Church, Hull, 25 September 1795; married, 13 May 1817 at St Pancras (Middx), John Frederic Foster JP (1795-1858) of Alderley Edge, barrister-at-law and stipendiary magistrate in Manchester, and had issue at least three sons and three daughters; died at Elleray, Windermere (Westmld), 19 May 1874; will proved 17 June 1874 (effects under £6,000);
(4) Ellen Maria Darling (1796-98), born 13 November and baptised at Bowl Alley Lane Presbyterian Church, Hull, 8 December 1796; died in infancy, 16 April 1798;
(5) Mary Ann Darling (later Bagshawe) (1797-1863), born 25 November and baptised at Wrawby, 27 December 1797; married 1st, 23 January 1817 at Norton, William Foster (1797-1829) of Kempston (Beds) and had issue one son (who died unmarried); married 2nd, 2 April 1846 at St Pancras (Middx), Thomas Fry (1774-1860); died in Bath, 22 February and was buried at Walcot St Swithin, 26 February 1863; will proved 11 March 1863 (effects under £2,000);
(6) Henry Ridgard Bagshawe (1799-1870), born 1 November and baptised 29 November 1799 at Wrawby (Lincs); educated at Oakham Grammar School (Rutland), Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1817; BA 1821; MA 1824) and Middle Temple (admitted, 1824; called to bar, 1825; bencher, 1855; treasurer, 1864); barrister-at-law (QC 1854); County Court judge on South Wales Circuit, 1861-68 and of Clerkenwell district, 1868-70; JP for Glamorganshire, Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire and Cardiganshire; received into the Roman Catholic church, 1834; married, 1 November 1824 at the British Embassy in Paris (France), Catherine Elizabeth (d. 1878), daughter of John Gunning CB, who was surgeon-in-chief at the Battle of Waterloo, and had issue five sons and five daughters; died 16 May 1870; will proved 11 June 1870 (effects under £2,000);
(7) Rev. Edward Benjamin Bagshawe (1800-84), born 15 October 1800; educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge (matriculated 1820; BA 1823; MA 1827); ordained deacon, 1823 and priest, 1824; rector of Eyam (Derbys), 1826-62; married, 8 June 1826 at Walford-on-Wye (Herefs), Jane, fourth daughter of William Partridge of Bishopswood (Herefs/Glos) and had issue three sons and one daughter; died 3 January and was buried at Walcot St Swithin, Bath, 8 January 1884; will proved 3 April 1884 (effects £3,519);
(8) Rev. Charles Frederic Bagshawe (1801-70), born 28 October 1801 and baptised at Norton, 13 February 1802; educated at Rugby; articled as a clerk to a solicitor by 1820 but later attended Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (matriculated 1826; BA 1830; MA 1833); ordained deacon, 1830 and priest, 1831; Chaplain to the Salford Hundred County Prison (New Bailey) (Lancs), 1831-68; married, 21 August 1830 at St Marylebone (Middx), Elizabeth Ann, daughter of George Hobson, and had issue five sons and three daughters; died 16 March 1870; will proved 13 May 1870 (effects under £3,000);
(9) Georgina Bagshawe (1803-04), born 13 January and baptised at Norton, 30 January 1803; died in infancy, 11 January 1804;
(10) Charlotte Helen Kirkland Bagshawe (1804-80), born 10 April 1804; married, 13 August 1827 at Humbleton (Yorks ER), Rev. Isaac Dixon (1801-58), vicar of Garton-in-Holderness (Yorks ER) and had issue seven sons and seven daughters; died 21 June 1880 and was buried at Bromley (Kent) Cemetery;
(11) Richard Chambers Bagshawe (1805-27), baptised at Norton, 25 March 1805; died unmarried of fever at Mesopotamia (Jamaica), 22 November 1827;
(12) Col. Samuel Robinson Bagshawe (1806-60), born 28 June 1806; an officer in the 7th Bengal Native Infantry (cadet, 1821; arrived in India, 1823; Ensign, 1823; Lt., 1823; Capt., 1841; Maj., 1854; retired as Lt-Col., 1855); married, 6/12 December 1826 at Berhampore, Bengal (India), Cornelia Eliza, daughter of Robert Roche and had issue two sons and one daughter; died 11 May 1860;
(13) Capt. Francis Darling Bagshawe (1807-40), born 18 June 1807 and baptised at Norton, 22 July 1815; an officer in the 5th Bombay Native Infantry (Capt.); sub-Assistant Commissary General; married, 8 June 1836 at Ockbrook (Derbys), Anne Eliza (c.1808-81), daughter of James Simpson of Derby, and had issue one son and one daughter; died at Bombay (India), 7 March 1840;
(14) Edmund Lloyd Bagshawe (1808-85), born 7 December 1808 and baptised at Norton, 22 July 1815; surgeon at Bath (Somerset); Licentiate of Society of Apothecaries of London, 1836; Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 1835-85 (Fellow, 1859); freemason from 1854; married 1st, 24 January 1838 at Hitchin (Herts), Anne Alicia (d. 1839), daughter of J.M. Pierson, and 2nd, 8 October 1842 at Holy Trinity, Bath (Somerset), Elizabeth (k/a Bessie) Anne (1816-79), only daughter of John Acres of Bath, and had issue by his second wife two sons and two daughters; died 22 September 1885; will proved 12 November 1885 (effects £228);
(15) Georgina Jubilee Bagshawe (1809-73), baptised at Norton, 3 January 1810; married, 9 May 1831 at St Giles-in-the-Fields, London, Capt. Herbert White (1801-50) of 8th Bengal Light Cavalry, and had issue one son and five daughters; died at Camberwell (Surrey), 20 April 1873; will proved 10 July 1873 (effects under £1,500);
(16) Emily Bagshawe (1813-84), born 1813 and baptised at Norton, 22 July 1815; married, 19 May 1836 at Walcot, Bath (Somerset), Rev. John Cooke Faber (1811-76), rector of Cricklade (Wilts) and had issue five sons and two daughters; died at Burrow Lodge, Ilfracombe (Devon), 22 November 1884 and was buried at Ilfracombe; will proved 23 January 1885 (effects £1,638);
(17) Rev. Augustus Adam Bagshawe (1815-83), born 27 February and baptised at Norton, 13 July 1815; educated at St Paul's School, London, St. George's Hospital, London, 1833-37, and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (matriculated 1837; BA 1842; MA 1867); ordained deacon, 1840 and priest, 1841; curate of Wormhill, 1841-43 and vicar there, 1843-81; rural dean of Buxton 1865-81; married, 26 June 1844, Caroline Emily, daughter of Rev. William Humphrey Vale, curate of Ecclesall, and had issue one son; died 3 August and was buried at Wormhill, 7 August 1883; will proved 3 October 1883 (effects £2,441);
(18-19) twin unnamed children (a boy and a girl) (b. & d. 1816), born 18 October 1816 and died the same day.
He inherited the Oakes Park, Wormhill Hall and Coates Hall estates from his kinsman, John Bagshawe (1758-1801) in 1801. He also maintained a house in Bath, where his widow lived after his death.
He died in Bath, 29 June 1832; his will was proved in the PCC, 28 July 1832. His widow died in Bath, 4 August 1843.

Bagshawe, William John (1793-1851). Eldest son of Sir William Chambers Darling Bagshawe (1771-1832), kt., and his wife Helen, daughter of Nathaniel Ridgard of Gainsborough, born in Edinburgh, 13 April 1793. Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1811; BA 1815; MA 1818) and the Middle Temple (admitted 1815; called to bar, 1822). Barrister-at-law. JP and DL for Derbyshire and JP for Yorkshire (WR). Chairman of Sheffield Board of Guardians, 1837-51. Founder and liberal supporter of Norton Agricultural Society. He married, 12 October 1822 at Monmouth, Sarah (1792-1876), third daughter of William Partridge of Bishopswood (Herefs/Glos), and had issue:
(1) William Leonard Gill Bagshawe (1828-54), born 29 October 1828 and baptised at Norton, 22 August 1829; educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1847; BA 1851; rowing blue, 1849); died unmarried when he was killed in an affray with poachers at Wormhill, 20 July 1854; will proved in the PCC, 15 August 1854;
(2) Sarah Alicia Bagshawe (1827-99), born 29 June and baptised at Norton, 3 July 1827; lived at Bakewell (Derbys) and then Dover (Kent) for many years with her younger sister; died unmarried, 20 November 1899; will proved 8 May 1900 (effects £3,675);
(3) Elizabeth Ursula Bagshawe (1829-97), born 27 October and baptised at Norton, 7 November 1829; married, 23 June 1853 at Norton, Sir Henry St. John Halford (1828-97), 3rd bt., of Wistow Hall (Leics), but had no issue; died 30 January 1897; will proved 11 August 1897 (effects £6,054);
(4) Caroline Anne Bagshawe (1831-1918), born 28 February and baptised at Norton, 18 April 1831; died 23 November 1918; lived at Bakewell (Derbys) and then Dover (Kent) for many years with her elder sister; will proved 8 January 1919 (estate £4,592);
(5) Francis Westby Bagshawe (1832-96) (q.v.);
(6) Helen Gertrude Bagshawe (1833-98), born 18 May and baptised at Norton, 10 August 1833; lived at Bakewell (Derbys); died 12 September 1898; administration of goods (with will annexed) granted to her surviving sisters, 24 November 1898 (effects £2,954);
(7) Cecilia Margaret Bagshawe (1834-1924), born 17 July and baptised at Norton, 8 September 1834; lived in Dover (Kent) for many years; died 22 February 1924, aged 89, and was buried at Charlton Cemetery, Dover;
(8) Rev. Alfred Drake Bagshawe (1836-1913) (q.v.).
He inherited Oakes Park, Wormhill Hall and Coates Hall from his father in 1832. After his death the estates passed in turn to his two eldest sons.
He died 1 June 1851 and was buried at Norton; his will was proved in the PCC, 1 August 1851. His widow died 14 May 1876.

Bagshawe, Francis Westby (1832-96). Second son of William John Bagshawe (1793-1851) and his wife Sarah, third daughter of William Partridge of Bishopswood (Herefs/Glos), born 4 April and baptised at Norton, 23 April 1832. Educated at Norton, Repton School, Uppingham School and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1851; BA 1855; MA 1859). An officer in the 6th Derbyshire Volunteer Rifles (Capt., 1860; disbanded 1861) and the West Yorkshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Cornet, 1861; Lt., 1862) and; JP (from 1855) and DL (from 1868) for Derbyshire and JP for West Riding of Yorkshire; High Sheriff of Derbyshire, 1868-69; Guardian of Ecclesall Poor Law Union, 1855-96 (Vice-Chairman, 1866-93; Chairman, 1893-96); Chairman of Ecclesall Rural Sanitary Authority, 1873-86; County Councillor for Derbyshire, 1889-96. A Conservative in politics, he was Chairman of the North-East Derbyshire Conservative Association. He married, 21 October 1873 at Shalford (Surrey), Caroline Amelia (1842-1922), sixth daughter of Robert Alfred Cloyne Godwin-Austen of Shalford House, and had issue:
(1) Beatrice Muriel Westby Bagshawe (1876-1966) (q.v.);
(2) Gladys Godwin de L'Hall Bagshawe (1877-1955), born 29 July and baptised at Norton, 16 September 1877; lived with her sister at Oakes Park; died unmarried, 6 January 1955; will proved 21 November 1955 (estate £107,137).
He inherited Oakes Park, Wormhill Hall and Coates Hall from his elder brother in 1854, but sold Coates Hall in 1883.
He died 28 April and was buried at Wormhill, 2 May 1896; will proved 10 July 1896 (effects £10,979). His widow died in Cairo (Egypt), 3 March 1922 and was buried there the following day.


Muriel Isherwood-Bagshawe
Bagshawe, (Beatrice) Muriel Westby (1876-1966). Elder daughter of Francis Westby Bagshawe (1832-96) of Oakes Park and his wife Caroline Amelia, sixth daughter of Robert Alfred Cloyne Godwin-Austen of Shalford House (Surrey), born 11 July 1876. She disliked change and refused to make modern improvements to Oakes Hall. She married, 21 November 1907 (sep. c.1925) at the Bavarian Chapel, Warwick St., London, Henry Bradshaw-Isherwood (1868-1940) of Marple Hall (Cheshire) and Bradshaw Hall (Derbys), barrister-at-law, but had no issue. After her marriage, she and her husband changed their name to Bradshaw-Isherwood-Bagshawe, but this was such a tongue-twister that it was frequently abbreviated to Isherwood-Bagshawe; her husband resumed his original name by deed poll in 1925.
She inherited Oakes Park and Wormhill Hall from her father in 1896, but handed them over to her first cousin once removed, Thornber Bagshawe, in 1963.
She died 9 May 1966; her will was proved 2 November 1966 (estate £40,560). Her husband died in London, 10 July 1940; his will was proved 3 December 1940 and 25 January 1941 (estate £78,980).

Bagshawe, Rev. Alfred Drake (1836-1913). Third son of William John Bagshawe (1793-1851) and his wife Sarah, third daughter of William Partridge of Bishopswood (Herefs/Glos), born 15 March 1836. Educated at Rugby and Emmanuel College, Cambridge (matriculated 1854; BA 1858; MA 1861). Ordained deacon, 1860 and priest, 1861. Held various short-term curacies, 1860-68; Rector of Stoke Lacy (Herefs), 1868-71; Vicar of South Creake (Norfk), 1872-77; Rector of Taynton (Glos), 1877-91 and Vicar of Wormhill, 1891-1902. He married, 16 April 1868 at Salford Priors (Warks), Frances Margaret (1839-1934), younger daughter of Rev. Samuel Ellis Garrard, vicar of Salford Priors , and had issue:
(1) Maj. Leonard Alfred Bagshawe (1869-1931), born 13 January 1869; educated at Uppingham and Royal Military College, Sandhurst; an officer in the Sherwood Foresters (2nd Lt., 1889; Lt., 1891; Capt. 1896; retired as Maj., 1906); married, 23 June 1892 at Highnam (Glos), Lydia Beatrice (d. 1940), daughter of F.C. Hengler, and had issue one son (d. 1952); died 20 June 1931; will proved 23 October 1931 (estate £1,676);
(2) Sir Arthur William Garrard Bagshawe (1871-1950) (q.v.);
(3) Frances Ursula Bagshawe (1870-1962), born 1 June 1870; married, 23 April 1907, Rev. Charles Edward Geneste Walsh (1861-1910), vicar of Catton (Norfk), but had no issue; died 7 February 1962, aged 91; will proved 1 May 1962 (estate £18,486).
He lived in retirement after 1902 at Shirland, Northwood (Middx).
He died 26 July 1913; his will was proved 22 August 1913 (estate £2,514). His widow died 18 May 1934, aged 95; her will was proved 16 July 1934 (estate £7,989).

Bagshawe, Sir Arthur William Garrard (1871-1950), kt. Second son of Rev. Alfred Drake Bagshawe (1836-1913) and his wife Frances Margaret, younger daughter of Rev. Samuel Ellis Garrard, vicar of Salford Priors (Warks), born 29 July 1871. Educated at Marlborough and Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge (matriculated 1889; BA 1892; MB and BCh, 1895; DPH, 1908) and St George's Hospital, London; MRCS and LRCP, 1895; house physician at Great Northern Central Hospital, London, 1898-1900; medical officer, Uganda Protectorate, 1900-07; member of the African Entomological Research Committee, 1909; director of Sleeping Sickness Bureau, 1909-12; director of Bureau of Hygiene and Tropical Diseases, 1912-35; President of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 1935; appointed CMG, 1915, and knighted, 1933; Mary Kingsley Medallist, 1920. He married, 20 September 1910 at All Souls, Langham Place, St. Marylebone (Middx), Alice Mary (1875-1944), daughter of Joseph Harry Thornber, merchant, and had issue:
(1) Thornber Bagshawe (1911-96) (q.v.);
(2) Christopher Frederick Bagshawe (1913-59), born 29 April and baptised at St Stephen, East Twickenham (Middx), 31 May 1913; apparently suffered from learning difficulties and was living in a home at Hastings by 1939; died unmarried, 4 December 1959.
He lived at Lower Bourne, near Farnham (Surrey) and in retirement near Talgarth (Brecons).
He died 24 March 1950; his will was proved 31 July and 21 December 1950 (estate £22,569). His wife died 26 April 1944; her will was proved 23 August 1944 and 18 April 1945 (estate £8,913).

Bagshawe, Thornber (1911-96). Elder son of Sir Arthur William Garrard Bagshawe (1871-1950) and his wife Alice Mary, daughter of Joseph Harry Thornber, born 21 September 1911. Educated at Haileybury and Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge. An officer in the Grenadier Guards (Lt., 1940; hon. Capt., 1945) during the Second World War, who served in North Africa and Italy, 1942-45. DL for Derbyshire, 1978. He married, 15 May 1946, his cousin, Hilary (1916-2003), elder twin daughter of Lt-Col. Herbert Vale Bagshawe, and had issue: 
(1) Gill Patricia Bagshawe (b. 1948), born 3 March 1948; married, Jul-Sep 1975, Michael J. Menage, and had issue; now living;
(2) Timothy John Bagshawe (b. 1951) (q.v.).
He received the Oakes Park and Wormhill Hall estates from his first cousin once removed by deed of gift in 1963. He lived at Wormhill Hall until 1966, then at Oakes Park until c.1985, when he sold Oakes Park and returned to Wormhill Hall.
He died 13 December 1996; his will was proved 20 March 1997.  His widow died 31 March 2003; her will was proved 30 June 2003.

Bagshawe, Timothy John (b. 1951). Only son of Thornber Bagshawe (1911-96) and his wife Hilary, daughter of Lt-Col. Herbert Vale Bagshawe, born 2 June 1951. Landowner and estate manager. He married, Oct-Dec 1979, Pamela Monks, and has issue:
(1) William Joseph Leonard Bagshawe (b. 1980), born July 1980; teacher; director of Peak Dale Lakes Ltd.;
(2) Ralph Henry Thomas Bagshawe (b. 1983), born 16 September 1983; product design engineer and inventor;
(3) Edward E.H. Bagshawe (b. 1986), born 13 July 1986;
(4) Joshua Timothy P. Bagshawe (b. 1990); educated at Sheffield Hallam University (BA 2012); product design engineer; principal designer with Josh Bagshawe Design since 2017;
He inherited the Wormhill Hall estate from his father in 1996.
Now living.

Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1965, pp. 30-32; J.J. Howard & F.A. Crisp, Visitation of England & Wales - Notes vol. 3, 1898, pp. 3-21; M. Craven & M. Stanley, Derbyshire Country Houses, 2001, pp. 164, 322-23; P. Leach & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Yorkshire: West Riding - Leeds, Bradford and the north, 2009, p. 111; C. Hartwell, Sir N. Pevsner & E. Williamson, The buildings of England: Derbyshire, 3rd edn., 2016, p. 664; R. Harman & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Yorkshire: West Riding - Sheffield and the south, 2017, pp. 615-16.


Location of archives


Bagshawe family of Oakes Park and Wormhill Hall: deeds, estate and family papers, maps and plans, 14th-20th cents. [Sheffield City Archives, OD]


Coat of arms


Per pale, ermine and gules, a bugle stringed between three roses, all counterchanged, barbed and seeded proper.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch. Can anyone:

  • Show how Richard Bagshawe (1675-1750) acquired Coates Hall, Barnoldswick?
  • Provide better photographs of the interior of Oakes Park when it was in private occupation?
  • Provide additional portraits or photographs of members of the family whose names appear in bold above?



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 1 January 2018.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please leave a comment if you have any additional information or corrections to offer, or if you are able to help with additional images of the people or buildings in this post.