Wednesday, 18 January 2017

(248) Atwood of Sanderstead Court

Atwood of Sanderstead Court
The family of Atte Wode is recorded as living at Coulsdon in Surrey as early as 1246, where their houses included properties known as Wood Place and Hooley House. Peter Atte Wode was MP for Guildford in 1384 and John Wode was Knight of the Shire for Surrey in 1459. Thomas Wode was made a Sergeant at Law in 1486 and King's Sergeant in 1488. These people were almost certainly among the ancestors of the Atwoods of Sanderstead, but the genealogy of the family cannot with confidence be carried any further back than John Wood alias Atwood (d. 1525), who describes himself in his will as a yeoman and whose home seems to have been at Sanderstead Court. For the next three generations, the family name continued to be given interchangeably as Wode, Wood, atte Wood, Atwood or Attwood, before settling down in the 17th century to a fairly consistent spelling of Atwood. Another peculiarity of the family at this time was their predilection for the forename John, which led John (d. 1525) to christen two of his five sons John, and Nicholas Atwood (d. 1586) to do the same thing. As a consequence it is effectively impossible to disentangle the life stories of the Johns with any certainty.

John Atwood (d. 1525) and his wife Denise (spelled Dionis, Denys, Denes etc), who died in 1531, are commemorated by a brass in Sanderstead church, and both their wills have survived. These sources suggest that they were married in about 1500, as their younger children were still minors when John died, but seem all to have been adults when his widow died six years later. There seems to be fairly strong evidence that the family followed the custom of Borough English, whereby the youngest son inherited all, or the majority, of the family property, and this explains why John's chief heir was his youngest son, John Wood alias Atwood (d. 1563?). Borough English is reasonably well attested as the custom for copyhold property on some Surrey manors, but its use in relation to freehold property is more unusual, and would have been a conscious choice in each generation of the family. John Atwood (d. 1563?) was likewise succeeded by his youngest son, Nicholas Wood alias Atwood (c.1539-86), who is said on his monument at Sanderstead to have served Queen Elizabeth since the second year of her reign. He is thought to have been connected with the Royal Mews at Charing Cross, but whether with the stables or the falconry element of the operation is unclear; it could be relevant that one John atte Wode was Keeper of the King's Goshawks in 1529. 

Nicholas and his wife Olive (d. 1603) lived chiefly in London, and produced a large family, but when Nicholas died in early middle age in 1586 his youngest son and heir, Richard Atwood (1584-1604) was an infant. Olive married again and took her children to live with her second husband at Aldenham in Hertfordshire, where she died in 1603, shortly after her son Richard. At this point the tradition of Borough English seems to have been set aside, and Nicholas' eldest son, Harman Atwood (1570-1653), an attorney in Cliffords Inn, took possession of the estate, repudiating the claim of his youngest brother, John. His action apparently led to dissension in the family and (in 1631) to a lawsuit, following which at least three of his brothers - James and the two Johns - emigrated to America. There is a persistent tradition that other members of the family also crossed the Atlantic, which may or may not be accurate, but the suggestion found in some online sources that Alice Atwood did so is apparently wrong, as she is not named as one of Olive's surviving children on her monument at Elstree (Herts) in 1603.

In 1610, Harman Atwood, whose unusual forename was his mother's maiden name, also inherited a share in the manor of Sanderstead under the will of his childless cousin, John Ownsted (d. 1600), and by 1618 he had bought out his co-heirs, Ownsted's sisters-in-law. When he died in 1653, he left the enlarged Sanderstead estate to the second son of his second marriage, who shared not only his name but also his occupation as a lawyer. In a careful avoidance of the disputes which had arisen between siblings in the previous generation, John Atwood (1599-1676), Harman's eldest son and heir at law, also assigned any interest he had in the property to Harman junior. Harman Atwood junior (1608-77) was unmarried and 'distinguished by his zeal for the established church'; he also remodelled or rebuilt Sanderstead Court at the end of his life despite having no children to whom to bequeath it. His will shows him supporting a wide range of local charitable causes and an extended kinship network. It is clear, however, that he used his wealth to exert control over the lives of his dependent relatives. Even his ultimate heir, his nephew George Atwood (1652-1722) was only reluctantly forgiven for marrying without his consent 'because others have done so'.

George Atwood's inheritance, which he received in 1682 on the death of his aunt, Olive Atwood (1614-82), left him a wealthy man and by 1690 he was being named in acts of parliament as one of the commissioners for raising taxes in Surrey. He was probably a JP for the county, although that seems not to be recorded in published sources, and there seems to be no evidence that he pursued a career. When he died in 1722 he broke with family tradition and left his estate to his eldest surviving son, John Atwood (1688-1761), who was called to the bar in the following year. John proved to be the last of the Atwood line, since his marriage was childless. When his widow died in 1765 the Sanderstead estate passed to his sister's son, Thomas Wigsell, another lawyer. The Wigsells perpetuated the name Atwood as a forename until the death of Col. Atwood Dalton Wigsell in 1878, after which the property passed by marriage to the Arkwright family.

Sanderstead Court, Surrey

The abbots of Hyde Abbey, Winchester, owned the manor in the middle ages and had a grange at Sanderstead, which was replaced in the 16th century by a manor house called Sanderstead Place, built out of the materials of, and presumably on the site of, the grange: this house in turn was pulled down about 1800. The manor passed in the 1610s to the Atwood family, who already had a house nearby, known as Sanderstead Court, which remained the principal seat of the family and became the manor house. 


Sanderstead Court, from a watercolour by John Hassall, 1822, when the house was leased to Sir George Colebrooke.
Image: Surrey History Centre 4348/2/3/2. 
Sanderstead Court: achievement of arms over the front door in the 1930s.

Sanderstead Court was presumably 16th century in origin, but was either rebuilt or extensively remodelled by Harman Atwood (1608-77), who completed the work in 1676, less than a year before his death. As remodelled, the house had a recessed centre, far-projecting wings and a central Ionic doorcase (which was moved forward later when a porch was built behind it). Above the doorway was a large carving of the Atwood coat of arms in a Corinthian aedicule with a segmental pediment. The windows to either side of the doorway were very tall and arched, and formed a central three bay unit which was framed by giant pilasters and emphasised by a step up in the parapet. The house contained a two-storey hall - perhaps in origin the great hall of the 16th century house - which was redecorated with fluted Corinthian columns when the house was rebuilt or remodelled. Although I have not found an illustration of this room, it was described in 1875 as 'somewhat similar to the Mercer's Hall in London', a sufficiently grand standard of comparison!


Sanderstead Court, from the Ordnance Survey 6" map surveyed in 1867.


Sanderstead Court: watercolour of the drawing room by Maria Lushington, c.1840. Image: Hazlitt, Gooden & Fox Ltd.

Little is known of any late 18th or early 19th century alterations to the house, but there was obviously at least a partial refit in about 1840, as a watercolour of the drawing room of this date by Maria Lushington shows what is obviously a new decorative scheme.  The lower wing to the north of the main house was added by J. Macvicar Anderson in 1866-67, and the same firm added further bedroom accommodation in 1895. 


Sanderstead Court in the 1930s, from an old postcard.


Sanderstead Court: the side elevation of the house in derelict condition in 1952.
Image reproduced by permission of Surrey History Centre (ref. 4209/3/147/13).
The house was converted into an hotel, known as Selsdon Court, in 1928 and was used by the RAF during the Second World War, but it was badly damaged by fire in 1944. After surviving in a derelict condition, it was largely demolished in the late 1950s; when one end of the north wing was patched up for use by the Selsdon Park Golf Club. Although the club has now moved elsewhere, this fragment survives and contains a small polygonal room. The stables, of red and yellow brick, with a central cupola, also survive. Much of the site has been built over for housing, but part of the grounds survives, with some splendid cedars.

Descent: John Wood alias Atwood (d. 1520); to Nicholas Wood alias Atwood (c.1539-86); to 
Harman Atwood (1570-1653), who bought out his co-heirs to the manor by 1618; to younger son, Harman Atwood (1608-77); to sister, Olive Atwood (1614-82); to nephew, George Atwood (1652-1722); to son, John Atwood (1682-1761); to widow (d. 1765) and then nephew, Thomas Wigsell (d. 1778) of London; to nephew, Atwood Wigsell (d. 1795); to brother, Rev. Thomas Wigsell (d. 1805); to niece, Susannah Wigsell (d. c.1807); to Rev. Atwood Wigsell Taylor (later Wigsell) (d. 1821); to son, Col. Atwood Dalton Wigsell (c.1821-78); to widow (who remarried 1886) and then to Capt. Frank Wigsell Arkwright (1848-93); to son, Esme Francis Wigsell Arkwright (b. 1882); sold 1919 and converted into an hotel in 1928; used by RAF in WW2 and burnt, 1944. In the early 19th century the house was mainly leased to tenants including Sir George Colebrooke (fl. 1822) and his son Henry Thomas Colebrooke (1765-1837).


Atwood family of Sanderstead Court



Wood (alias Atwood), John (d. 1525). Yeoman of Sanderstead. He married Denise [surname unknown] (d. 1531), and had issue:
(1) Henry Wood (alias Atwood) (fl. 1531);
(2) John Wood (alias Atwood alias Hewson) (d. 1573?); perhaps the person of this name buried at Sanderstead, 31 January 1572/3; 
(3) Richard Wood (alias Atwood) (fl. 1531);
(4) Edward Wood (alias Atwood) (fl. 1525);
(5) John Wood (alias Atwood) (d. 1563?);
(6) Agnes Wood (alias Atwood) (fl. 1531); unmarried in 1531.
He probably lived at Sanderstead Court.
He died 30 July 1525 and was buried at Sanderstead, where he is commemorated by a monumental brass; his will was proved in the PCC, 5 September 1525. His widow's will was proved at Kingston, 17 March 1530/1.

Wood (alias Atwood), John (d. 1563?). Fourth son of John Wood (alias Atwood) (d. 1525) and his wife Denise. He married [name unknown], and had issue including:
(1) Thomas Wood (alias Atwood) (d. 1568); buried at Sanderstead, 10 August 1568;
(2) Robert Wood (alias Atwood) (d. 1570); buried at Sanderstead, 16 April 1570;
(3) Nicholas Wood (alias Atwood) (c.1539-86) (q.v.).
He inherited his father's estate at Sanderstead in 1525 and came of age before 1531.
He may have been the person of this name buried at St Martin in the Fields, 19 March 1562/3

Wood (alias Atwood), Nicholas (c.1539-86). Third son of John Atwoode and his wife, born about 1539. An officer of the Royal Household from c.1560-86, probably connected with the royal mews or stables. He married, 30 January 1569/70 at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster (Middx), Olive (1548-1603), daughter of James Harman of London, merchant, and had issue including:
(1) Harman Wood (alias Atwood) (1570-1653) (q.v.);
(2) Oliver Wood (alias Atwood) (1572-86), baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields, 28 August 1572; said to have died young, 1586;
(3) Alice Wood (alias Atwood) (b. 1573?; fl. 1586); she was probably baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields in 1573, when there is a gap in the register; living in 1586 but probably dead by 1603;
(4) Susan Wood (alias Atwood) (b. 1575; fl. 1603), baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields, 16 July 1575; unmarried in 1603;
(5) John Wood (alias Atwood)* (1576-1645), baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, 20 September 1576; emigrated to America c.1635; assistant to the Governor (i.e. magistrate) in Plymouth, Massachusetts, by 1638, and active in the affairs of the colony until his death; married, probably in America, Ann Lee (d. 1654) but had no issue; buried at Plymouth, Massachusetts, 27 February 1643/4; will proved 5 June 1644;
(6) Nicholas Wood (alias Atwood) (1578?-1602); he was perhaps baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields early in 1578, when there is a gap in the register; died unmarried and was buried at Sanderstead, 6 June 1602;
(7) Thomas Wood (alias Atwood) (b. 1579; fl. 1642), baptised at St Michael in the Fields, 4 July 1579;
(8) James Wood (alias Atwood) (1581-c.1644), baptised at St Michael in the Fields, 30 January 1580/1; leather-seller in London; emigrated to Plymouth, Massachusetts (USA) in about 1635; he married but had no issue; said to have died at Plymouth, c.1644;
(9) twin, John Wood (alias Atwood)* (b. 1582), baptised at Sanderstead, 4 February 1581/2; leather-seller in London; emigrated to America after 1631; married, 25 July 1612 at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Joan Coleson, and had issue; died in America;
(10) twin, Derick Wood (alias Atwood) (1582-83), baptised at Sanderstead, 4 February 1581/2; died in infancy and was buried at Sanderstead, 21 July 1583;
(11) Richard Wood (alias Atwood) (1584-1603), baptised at St Michael in the Fields, 26 June 1584; inherited the Sanderstead estate from his father in 1586; said to have died at Elstree before his mother, 1603.
He inherited his father's Sanderstead estate, probably in 1563 or 1573, and was resident at Sanderstead Court in 1568.
He died 10 May 1586 and was buried at St Michael in the Fields, London, 12 May 1586; he was commemorated by a monument in Sanderstead church. His widow married 2nd, 1592, John Buck of Aldenham (Herts) and had further issue one son; she was buried at Elstree (Herts), 1603, where she is commemorated by a monument.
* The existence of two John Woods in this generation, both of whom appear to have emigrated to America, makes it impossible to be certain whether the elder or the younger married in England.

Wood (alias Atwood), Harman (1570-1653). Eldest son of Nicholas Wood alias Atwood (d. 1586) and his wife, born 23 November 1570. Attorney of Clifford's Inn, London. His actions in taking possession of the Sanderstead estate on the death of his youngest brother in 1603 were contested by some of his siblings. He married 1st, 6 February 1598/9 at St Gregory by St Paul's, London, Elizabeth (d. 1604), daughter of Simon Lawrence, and 2nd, 19 August 1605 at Chislehurst (Kent), Joan (d. 1641), daughter of Arnold King of Beckenham (Kent), and had issue including:
(1.1) John Atwood (1599-1676) (q.v.);
(1.2) Ownsted Atwood (b. 1600), baptised at Sanderstead, 19 October 1600; probably died young;
(1.3) Olive Atwood (1602-04), baptised at Sanderstead, 3 October 1602; died in infancy and was buried at Sanderstead, 16 February 1603/4;
(1.4) Ann Atwood (1604-68?), baptised at Sanderstead, 19 August 1604; died unmarried after 1642; perhaps the person of this name who died of fever and was buried at St Botolph Aldersgate, London, 15 July 1668;
(2.1) Susan Atwood (1606-59), baptised at Sanderstead, 9 June 1606; died unmarried and was buried at Sanderstead, 2 August 1659;
(2.2) Rev. King Atwood (1607-74), baptised at Sanderstead, 16 August 1607; educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford (matriculated 1623; BA 1626; MA 1629); ordained deacon, 1630 and priest, 1631; vicar of Sanderstead 1630-74; married, 27 June 1637 at Chislehurst (Kent), Elizabeth Brooke (d. 1642) and had issue one son (Harman (1641-1702)) and two daughters (Joan b. 1638; Susan b. 1639 m. John Till)); died 1 April and was buried at Sanderstead, 4 April 1674;
(2.3) Harman Atwood (1608-77) (q.v.);
(2.4) Thomas Atwood (1611-60), baptised at Sanderstead, 17 February 1610/11; died unmarried and was buried at Sanderstead, 23 February 1659/60;
(2.5) Olive Atwood (1614-82) (q.v.);
(2.6) John Atwood (1616-76), baptised at Sanderstead, 7 January 1616/7; died unmarried and was buried at Sanderstead, 21 February 1675/6.
He inherited Sanderstead Court from his youngest brother in 1603 and two-thirds of the manor of Sanderstead from  John Ownsted the 1610s; he purchased the remainder of the manor from his co-heirs before 1618.
He died aged 83 and was buried at Sanderstead, 15 December 1653, where he was commemorated by a brass; his will was proved in London, 5 February 1654/5. His first wife was buried at Sanderstead, 26 August 1604, where she is commemorated by a ledger stone. His second wife died 3 January 1640/1 and was buried at Sanderstead, where she is commemorated by a monument.

Atwood, Harman (1608-77). Second son of Harman Atwood (1570-1653) and his second wife, Joan, daughter of Arnold King of Beckenham (Kent), baptised at Sanderstead, 18 December 1608. Educated at Inner Temple (admitted 1641). Attorney at Cliffords Inn, London. He was a patron of the poet, John Oldham, who wrote an elegy in his memory, according to which he was distinguished by his zeal for the established church; his will benefits an unusually large number of local charities and makes provision for members of an extended kinship network in terms which make it clear that he was an exacting and controlling patron. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Sanderstead Court from his father in 1653, and rebuilt or remodelled it by 1676. At his death he bequeathed the estate to his surviving sister Olive (d. 1682) (q.v.), with remainder to the younger sons of his half-brother, John Atwood.
He died 16 February and was buried 22 February 1676/7; his will was proved 20 February 1676/7.

Atwood, Olive (1614-82). Daughter of Harman Atwood (d. 1653) and his second wife, Joan, daughter of Arnold King of Beckenham (Kent), baptised at Sanderstead, 20 March 1613/4. She rebuilt the rectory at Sanderstead in 1680. She was unmarried and without issue.
She inherited the Sanderstead Court estate from her brother in 1677.
She died 17 February 1681/2 and was buried at Sanderstead 23 February 1681/2.

Atwood, John (1599-1676). Eldest son of Harman Atwood (1570-1653) and his first wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Simon Lawrence, baptised at Aldenham (Herts), 28 May 1599. He married Joan [surname unknown] (d. 1690) and had issue:
(1) Harman Atwood (c.1634-1715), probably born before 1636*; married, 24 December 1677 at Sutton, Rebecca Burrows; died 1 January 1714/5 according to his monument;
(2) Elizabeth Atwood (fl. 1720), probably born before 1636; married, 7 February 1660 at St Michael Paternoster Royal, London, John Rogers; mentioned in the will of her brother, George in 1720;
(3) Joan Atwood (b. 1639), baptised at Sutton (Surrey), 17 October 1639; 
(4) Mark Atwood (fl. 1676), probably born after 1642 as he is not mentioned in the will of his grandfather made in that year; married and had issue a son (George);
(5) John Atwood (b. 1647), baptised at Sutton, 20 April 1647;
(6) George Atwood (1652-1722) (q.v.).
He lived at Sutton (Surrey) and assigned his rights in the Sanderstead Court estate to his half-brother, Harman Atwood.
He was buried at Sanderstead, 21 February 1675/6. His widow was buried at Sutton, 3 December 1690.
* When the earliest surviving Sutton parish register commences.

Atwood, George (1652-1722). Fourth and youngest son of John Atwood (1599-1676) and his wife Joan, baptised at Sutton (Surrey), 30 March 1652. He acted as a commissioner for raising taxes in Surrey, 1690-1701. He married 1st, before 1676 and without the approval of his half-uncle and benefactor, [name unknown] and 2nd, 15 July 1683 at St Mary, Newington (Surrey), Elizabeth Pratt (d. 1705) and had issue:
(1.1) Charity Atwood (d. 1675); buried at St Mary, Newington, 4 June 1675;
(1.2) George Atwood (b. 1676), baptised at St Mary, Newington, 28 May 1676; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Newington, 2 August 1676;
(1.3) Margaret Atwood (b. 1677), baptised at St Mary, Newington, 15 July 1677; probably died young;
(1.4) Ann Atwood (d. 1678); died young and was buried at St Mary Newington, 15 July 1678;
(2.1) Mary Atwood (1686-1714), baptised at Sanderstead, 5 September 1686; married, 15 April 1707 at Sanderstead, Nicholas Wigsell (d. 1720) of Greenwich, maltster (who m2, 21 February 1716 at St Lawrence Jewry, London, Susanna Bailey), son of Thomas Wigsell, and had issue, from whom descended the late 18th century owners of Sanderstead Court; died 15 May 1714;
(2.2) George Atwood (1687-88), baptised at Sanderstead, 31 August 1687; died in infancy and was buried at Sanderstead, 12 December 1688;
(2.3) John Atwood (1688-1761) (q.v.);
(2.4) Thomas Atwood (1689-1714), baptised at Sanderstead, 17 October 1689; educated at Merton College, Oxford (matriculated 1707); died unmarried and was buried at Sanderstead, 5 January 1714, according to monument;
(2.5) Christopher Atwood (1690-1730), baptised at Sanderstead, 16 September 1690; married 25 February 1719/20 at St Katherine Coleman, London, Catherine (1690-1753), daughter of John Steward of Westminster (Middx), but apparently had no issue; buried at Sanderstead, 29 December 1730;
(2.6) George Atwood (1691-1758), baptised at Sanderstead, 1 September 1691; citizen and painter-stainer of London; lived at Blackfriars; married, 4 May 1718 at St Anne & St Agnes, London, Mary Grindell (d. 1748) and had issue two sons and four daughters; will proved 24 October 1758;
(2.7) Susanna Atwood (1694-1719), baptised at Sanderstead, 10 October 1694; died 24 December and was buried at Sanderstead, 30 December 1719;
(2.8) Olive Atwood (b. & d. 1695), born 27 August and baptised at Sanderstead, 10 October 1695; died in infancy and was buried at Sanderstead, 12 October 1695.
He inherited the Sanderstead Court estate in 1682 under the will of his half-uncle, Harman Atwood (d. 1677).
He died 15 July and was buried in the churchyard at Sanderstead, 22 July 1722, where he and his children are commemorated on a table tomb; his will was proved in the PCC, 12 September 1722. His first wife died before 1683. His second wife died 1 February and was buried 7 February 1704/5.

Atwood, John (1688-1761). Son of George Atwood (d. 1722) and his wife Elizabeth, baptised 9 October 1688. Educated at Merton College, Oxford (matriculated 1705) and Inner Temple (admitted 1713; called to bar, 1723). Barrister-at-law. He married 22 May 1718 at St Paul's Cathedral, London, Elizabeth Stacey (c.1680-1765), but had no issue.
He inherited the Sanderstead Court estate from his father in 1722. At his death the estate passed to his widow for life and then to his cousin, Thomas Wigsell, attorney-at-law.
He died 25 August and was buried at Sanderstead, 1 September 1761; his will was proved in the PCC, 4 September 1761. His widow died aged 85, and was buried at Sanderstead, 22 June 1765.


Sources


The Architect, 14 August 1875, p. 92; H.A.W., History of the Atwood family in England and the United States, 1888 [this publication needs to be treated with caution and cannot be relied upon for factual accuracy]; T. Mason, A register of the baptisms, marriages and burials in... St Martin in the Fields, 1550-1619, Harleian Soc., 1898; W.B. Bannerman, The parish registers of Sanderstead, 1908; VCH Surrey, vol. 4, pp. 237-43; Sir N. Pevsner & B. Cherry, The buildings of England: Surrey, 2nd edn., 1971, pp. 447-48; http://davidjatwood.com/uploads/Sanderstead__Surrey_England.pdf


Location of archives


No substantial accumulation is known to survive.


Coat of arms


Gules a lion rampant argent between three acorns or. [Some members of the family seem to have used a variant with six acorns].


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Can anyone provide interior photographs of Sanderstead Court before its demolition?
  • There are many unknowns about the genealogy of this family, especially in the 16th and early 17th century. If you have any further information about the family, please do get in touch.



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 18 January 2017.

Friday, 13 January 2017

(247) Atwood of Littlebury Hall

Atwood of Littlebury
William Wood, alias att Wood or Atwood, married Alice Salyng in 1547. Alice was the widow of Augustine Salyng (d. 1546), who had been lord of the manor of Littlebury in the Essex parish of Stanford Rivers, and whose heir was his only daughter Alice (d. 1551). When Alice died as a child, the manor reverted to Augustine's two sisters, Elizabeth Rolfe and Katherine Johnson, and in 1553 they, together with their husbands, settled the manor on William Wood and his wife. The Woods may have been responsible for the rebuilding of the manor house at Littlebury. In the years up to 1562, they produced seven sons, five of whom survived to adulthood. The Littlebury estate was settled on their eldest surviving son, John Wood alias Atwood (1550-1623) at the time of his marriage in 1594. John, who was perhaps a lawyer or merchant in London up to then, settled in Stanford Rivers and, with his much younger wife Dorothy, produced an even larger family of eleven children. From this time onwards the family surname is always Atwood rather than Wood. When John died in 1623 his eldest son, William Atwood (1596-1647) was just of age. He was active in the Parliamentary cause during the Civil War, not as a soldier but as a local official raising funds for the support of the Parliamentarian army from taxes and fines on Royalists whose estates had been sequestered. He died relatively young and his widow, Elizabeth, seems to have taken control of the estates until her son and heir, William Atwood (c.1630-78) came of age. William also died relatively young, and his widow Ann (1637-1706) and their son, William Atwood (b. 1662) joined forces in 1701 to sell the Littlebury estate, ending the family's connection with the property.

Broomfield Hall, Essex. Image: John Tildesley.

The second son of John Attwood (d. 1623) was John Attwood (1599-1672), who was trained for the law and became a barrister in London. His father left him an estate at Writtle (Essex) and in 1642 he married the heiress to Broomfield Hall in Essex, to which he retired at the end of his life. He produced two sons, both of whom became lawyers, and two daughters. His elder son, John Atwood, inherited Broomfield Hall; the second, William Atwood (d. 1712), was a Whig barrister who published many pamphlets on topics of constitutional law, including The Fundamental Constitution of the English Government, 1690, which set out a defence of the legality of the transfer of power from James II to William & Mary. In 1700 he was appointed Lord Chief Justice of New York, but quickly fell foul of the local politicians, being dismissed by the Governor, Lord Cornbury, and having to scuttle back to England in fear of his life.


Littlebury Hall, Stanford Rivers, Essex


A mid 16th to early 17th century hall house with a brick ground floor with a timber-framed upper story.
Ordnance Survey 6" map surveyed in 1871-73, showing site of Littlebury
Only a part of the original house survives, comprising a two-bay hall and the north cross-wing. The hall has two original windows with moulded brick jambs and hood-moulds, a moulded oak door-frame, and some original glass. The cross-wing to the north was remodelled in the early 19th century and has a Georgian doorcase flanked by two wide bay windows, with sash windows above. Internally there is some 16th century panelling and moulded woodwork. In the middle of the 19th century it was said of Littlebury Hall that more than 20 rooms (presumably including the southern cross-wing) had been taken down in living memory, and in 1921 foundations were observed to the east of the house, showing that it was at one time of greater extent. The house is now unoccupied and in poor condition, and on Historic England's 'Heritage at Risk' register.


Descent: Richard Salyng (d. 1528); to son, Augustine Salyng (d. 1546); to daughter, Alice Salyng (d. 1551); to aunts, Elizabeth Rolfe and Katherine Johnson, who with their husbands settled the estate om Augustine's widow Alice and her second husband, William Atwood (d. 1600); to son, John Atwood (1550-1623); to son, William Atwood (1596-1647); to son, William Atwood (c.1630-78); to son, William Atwood (b. 1662; fl. 1701), who sold 1701 to John Bull; to widow, Mrs. Bull (fl. 1729); to daughter, wife of Timothy Graves (fl. 1767)... Joseph Waylet, sold 1811 to Timothy Phillips... J. Kynaston (fl. 1842), who let to E. Phillips...



Atwood family of Littlebury Hall



Atwood alias Wood, William (d. 1600). Parentage unknown. He married, 27 May 1547 at Stanford Rivers, Alice, widow of Augustine Salyng (d. 1546), and had issue:
(1) William Atwood alias Wood (d. 1550), died in infancy and was buried at Stanford Rivers, 24 August 1550;
(2) John Atwood alias Wood (1550-1623) (q.v.);
(3) Edward Atwood alias Wood (b. 1553), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 29 January 1553; living in 1623; 
(4) Thomas Atwood alias Wood (b. 1556), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 4 March 1555/6; died young;
(5) William Atwood alias Wood (1557-1636?), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 31 March 1557; perhaps the man of this name buried at Stanford Rivers, 24 August 1636;
(6) Thomas Atwood alias Wood (b. 1560), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 25 August 1560; living in 1623;
(7) Richard Atwood alias Wood (b. 1562), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 11 October 1562; living in 1623.
He acquired Littlebury Hall through his marriage and settled it on his son John in 1594.
He was buried at Stanford Rivers, 28 February 1599/1600; his will was proved in the Essex Archdeaconry Court, 16 June 1600. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Atwood, John (1550-1623). Son of William Atwood (d. 1600) and his wife Alice, widow of Augustine Salyng, baptised at Stanford Rivers, 3 January 1550/1. He married, 15 May 1594 at St Stephen Walbrook, London, Dorothy, daughter of William Walter of Wimbledon, and had issue including:
(1) Elizabeth Atwood (1595-1634), baptised at Wimbledon, 14 September 1595; married, 28 January 1610 at Stanford Rivers, William Lake (d. 1646), gent.; buried at Stanford Rivers, 1 December 1634;
(2) William Atwood (1596-1647) (q.v.);
(3) Dorothy Atwood (b. 1598), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 2 July 1598; probably died young before 1604;
(4) John Atwood (1599-1672) of Broomfield Hall (Essex), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 24 August 1599; educated at Queens' College, Oxford (matriculated 1615) and Grays Inn (admitted 1624); inherited an estate at Writtle, Willingale Spains and Willingdale Doe (all Essex) from his father in 1623; barrister-at-law; a Parliamentarian during the Civil War (DL 1643) and a member of the county sequestration committee; married, 17 August 1642 at Broomfield, Elizabeth (c.1622-75), daughter and co-heiress of Patrick Young of Broomfield, and had issue two sons and two daughters; buried at Broomfield, 27 June 1672;
(5) Rev. Walter Atwood (1600-35), baptised 29 September 1600; educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (matriculated 1618; BA 1621/2; MA 1625); curate of Wetherfield (Essex), 1632; vicar of Warminster (Wilts), 1634-35 and Stratton St. Margaret (Wilts), 1635; died unmarried, November 1635 and was buried at Warminster, where he is commemorated by a monument; will proved 22 December 1635;
(6) Ann Atwood (1602-68?), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 26 January 1601/2; unmarried and living at Woolverstone (Suffk) in 1635; perhaps the person of this name buried at Writtle (Essex), 22 October 1668;
(7) Katherine Atwood (1603-75), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 27 November 1603; married, 28 January 1629, Francis Ram (1606-36), draper of London, son of Edward Ram; probably the person of this name buried at Hornchurch (Essex), 11 January 1675;
(8) Dorothea Atwood (b. 1604), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 1 November 1604; living in 1623;
(9) Edward Atwood (1605-11), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 23 March 1605; died young and was buried at Stanford Rivers, 1 June 1611;
(10) Richard Atwood (b. 1607), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 7 April 1607; living in 1623;
(11) Francis Atwood (1608-62), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 6 November 1608; living in London, 1635; probably the person of this name who was buried at St Bartholomew the Great, London, 4 February 1661/2.
Littlebury Hall was settled on him on his marriage in 1594.
He was buried at Stanford Rivers, 28 April 1623; his will was proved 7 July 1623. His widow apparently married 2nd, [forename unknown] Latham, and was living in 1630.

Atwood, William (1596-1647). Son of John Atwood and his wife Dorothy, daughter of William Walter of Wimbledon, baptised at Stanford Rivers, 21 December 1596. Educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (admitted 1614) and Middle Temple (admitted 1616). He was an active Parliamentarian during the Civil War (DL 1643), sitting on various county committees raising funds for the Parliamentarian army; appointed a member of the county sequestration committee, 1643. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Mole, and had issue including:
(1) William Atwood (c.1630-78) (q.v.);
(2) John Atwood (b. c.1634; fl. 1649); apprenticed for eight years to Henry Spurstow (1609-76) of London, merchant, 1648/9;
(3) Mary Atwood; married, 1668 (settlement 1668), Rev. James Speering (c.1629-71), rector of Colne Engaine (Essex) and St Martin Vintry, London.
He inherited Littlebury Hall from his father.
He was buried at Stanford Rivers, 22 September 1647. His widow was living in 1668; her date of death is unknown.

Atwood, William (c. 1630-78). Son of William Atwood and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Mole, born about 1630. Educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge (matriculated 1647). He married, c.1658, Anne (1637-1706), daughter of William Glascock of Stanford Rivers, and had issue including:
(1) Mary Atwood (1660-1717), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 14 January 1660; died unmarried and was buried at Stanford Rivers, 6 March 1717;
(2) William Atwood (b. 1662; fl. 1701) (q.v.);
(3) Elizabeth Atwood (b. & d. 1663), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 23 September 1663; died in infancy and was buried at Stanford Rivers, 9 October 1663;
(4) Jane Atwood (b. 1667), baptised at Stanford Rivers, 2 January 1667/8.
He inherited Littlebury Hall from his father. At his death he left his wife a life interest in the estate with reversion to their son.
He was buried at Stanford Rivers, 14 February 1678. His widow was buried at Stanford Rivers, 20 November 1706.

Atwood, William (b. 1662; fl. 1701). Son of William Atwood and his wife Anne, daughter of William Glascock of Stanford Rivers, baptised at Stanford Rivers, 19 September 1662. 
He inherited the reversion of the Littlebury estate from his father in 1678, but joined with his mother in selling it in 1701. He may subsequently have lived at Lovings, Chipping Ongar, which was sold in 1723 and became the rectory house.
His date of death has not been traced.


Sources


VCH Essex, vol. 4, 1956, p. 215; J. Bettley & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Essex, 3rd edn., 2007, p. 735.


Location of archives


Atwood of Littlebury: a small group of deeds, 1662-1703 [Essex Record Office, D/DQ 55/78]


Coat of arms


Quarterly, first and fourth, Argent, on a fess raguly azure three fleurs-de-lis or ; second and third, Azure, three roses or.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Can anyone supply an historic or contemporary photograph of Littlebury Hall that could be used to illustrate this account?
  • Does anyone know what happened to William Atwood (b. 1662) after he sold Littlebury in 1701? Can anyone confirm that he was the man of this name who later lived at 'Lovings', Chipping Ongar?


Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 13 January 2017.

Sunday, 8 January 2017

(246) Atty of Ingon Grange

Attye of Ingon Grange
The fortunes of the Atty family were founded by James Atty (1743-1814) of Whitby (Yorks NR), who began as a master mariner and progressed to be a prosperous ship owner, merchant and sailmaker. In the later 18th century he owned a substantial number of vessels and was arguably the wealthiest man in the town. His elder son, James Atty (1768-1815), worked with him from the 1780s, but in about 1803 - perhaps when James senior decided to retire or semi-retire - he moved to Lincolnshire, where he acquired an estate at Pinchbeck and Surfleet near Spalding. He was sufficiently wealthy and well-educated to be accepted by the Lincolnshire gentry community, and became a Major in the militia and married a daughter of Sir Thomas Whichcote, 5th bt. of Aswarby Hall. When she died after only thirty months of marriage, having produced an heir but no spare, he married the daughter and heiress of a Lincolnshire clergyman, through whom he inherited property at Doddington and Westborough in Lincolnshire and in adjoining parts of Nottinghamshire. A second son was born in 1814, but James himself died the following year. His will divided his property between his elder son, James Atty (1810-77), who received the lands around Pinchbeck and his widow, Catherine (d. 1864), who received her father's lands. Her share passed in due course to their son George Atty (1814-84), who was a barrister in chambers in London.

James Atty (1810-77) was educated at Rugby School and on leaving, went into the army for about four years, retiring after he married in 1831.
Penley Hall, Flintshire. Image: Thomas Lloyd
His property at Pinchbeck seems not to have included a gentry house, and by the mid-1830s he was renting Penley Hall in Flintshire (a house of about 1800) from the Dymock family. From 1841 to 1843 he was Master of the Flintshire Hounds, although the expenses of the pack seem to have been largely met by the Williams-Wynn family. In 1845 he gave up the lease of Penley and moved to Rugby, where he lived in a large villa for the rest of his life. The motive for this move is not clear, but it was the time of the railway mania, Rugby was a railway town, and since as soon as he was settled in the town he appears on the committees promoting nearby new lines, it may have been his desire to get involved in the railway rush that made him relocate. James had five sons but two of them predeceased him while a third was bankrupted in 1874 and fled to France. His heir was his third son, Charles Atty (1839-82), but he was unmarried and survived his father by only five years. In 1882, therefore, the family property passed into the hands of James' youngest son, Robert Atty (1849-1911), who was already exhibiting signs of unstable behaviour, and who was confined in a lunatic asylum in Dulwich from 1892 until his death. In 1884 Robert also inherited the Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire estates of his half-uncle George Atty (1814-84). All his property was placed in the hands of Trustees, who sold it for the benefit of his heirs in 1918, principally his son, Welby Robert Atty (1872-1949) and surviving daughter, Eleanor Etough Atty (1876-1944).


The younger son of James Atty (1743-1814) of Whitby was Robert Middleton Atty (1770-1833). He is said to have become a merchant in London, and was perhaps the London partner of his father in a coastal shipping business, although this is pure speculation. Sometime between 1808 and 1810 he relocated to Warwickshire, and within a year or two he had bought Ingon Grange at Snitterfield. The house at this time is said to have been a 17th century cottage, but either he or his son and heir, Robert James Attye (1810-62), rebuilt it, creating the rather pretty gentleman's villa illustrated below. In the mid-1850s Robert James Atty and several of his siblings seem to have taken a collective decision to add a final 'e' to the spelling of the family surname; how this came about is unclear, but it may have been intended to imply a spurious antiquity of lineage. When Robert James Atty died relatively young, the representation of the family devolved on his younger brother, Lt-Col. Francis Lionel Octavius Attye (1830-85), a career soldier, but Ingon Grange seems to have been left to his sister, Harriet Caroline Atty (1814-1901) who lived there with her spinster sisters, in trust for Francis' son, Robert Jervoise Attye (1862-1916), who came of age in 1883. He sold off the farming stock in 1887 and presumably rented out the land to neighbouring farmers; and when his mother died in 1892 he let the house. He was himself unmarried and lived at the Cavalry Club in London, until - like his cousin, Robert - he too became mentally ill and was declared insane in 1912. After he died in 1916, Ingon Grange passed to Welby Robert Atty (1872-1949), who lived in Devon and continued the lease agreed by R.J. Atty in 1895. He finally sold it in 1923, and two of his three children emigrated to Kenya.


Ingon Grange, Snitterfield, Warwickshire


Ingon Grange: the south front of the house in the 1860s. Image: Warwickshire County Record Office PH, 331/13

There is said to have been a 17th century cottage on the site of Ingon Grange when Robert Middleton Atty bought it in about 1810. Either he or his son, Robert James Atty, who inherited in 1833, rebuilt it as a rather pretty Gothic house in the 1820s or 1830s. Photographs of the 1860s show that it had a three bay garden front of two storeys with a projecting gabled centre forming a round-arched porch on the ground floor. To either side were cast iron verandahs and three-light mullioned and transomed windows with arched lights. Flanking this facade were single storey wings with low-pitched roofs, broad eaves, and canted bay windows occupying their whole width. The stone entrance front had five bays, each gabled, and an entrance door under a smaller gable with a little crenellated porte cochere. Inside, the entrance hall had an enviable staircase on a shallow curve with iron balusters alternating plain with lozenges, two to a tread.


Ingon Grange: south front in 2006. Image: David Stowell. Some rights reserved.

After a long planning wrangle, permission to demolish this house was given in 1974 and it was eventually replaced c.1983 by a slightly smaller L-shaped house of red brick. The new house does, however, incorporate a single-storey canted bay window at the right hand end of the south front which echoes the form of the wings of the old house, presumably intentionally.

Descent: Robert Middleton Atty (1770-1833); to son, Robert James Attye (1810-62); to sister, Harriet Catherine Atty (1814-1901) in trust for her nephew, Robert Jervoise Attye (1862-1916) who let from 1895 (to Philip S. Foster); to kinsman, Welby Robert Atty (1872-1949), who sold 1923 to Madeline and Marguerite Chadwick; sold 1951 to Christopher Albert Rookes (fl. 1951-77); sold 1973 to Carbilly Trading Ltd, who demolished it...


Atty family of Ingon Grange



Atty, James (1743-1814). Second son of James Attye (1711-79) of Whitby (Yorks NR) and his wife Isabella, daughter of G. Weatherhill, baptised at Whitby, 9 May 1743. Master mariner, merchant, shipowner and sailmaker at Whitby. He married, 14 February 1768 at Whitby, Hannah (1748-1811), daughter of Robert Middleton, and had issue:
(1) James Atty (1768-1815) (q.v.);
(2) Robert Middleton Atty (1770-1833) (q.v.);
(3) George Atty (1773-97), baptised 18 October 1773; educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (admitted 1796); Capt. of Whitby Corps of Volunteers, 1795; died unmarried, 24 November 1797.
He died 19 August and was buried at Whitby, 26 August 1814; his will was proved in the PCC, 9 September 1814. His wife died 5 July 1811.

Atty, Robert Middleton (1770-1833). Second son of James Attye (1743-1814) and his wife Hannah, daughter of Robert Middleton, baptised at Whitby, 18 July 1770. Merchant in London. JP (from 1812) and DL (from 1831) for Warwickshire; High Sheriff of Warwickshire, 1824. He married, 4 February 1808 at Christian Malford (Wilts), Margaret Lucy (1786-1855), youngest daughter of Ven. William Willes, archdeacon of Wells, and had issue:
(1) Hannah Lucy Atty (1808-72), born 3 November 1808 and baptised at Whitby, 24 September 1809; died unmarried at Ingon Grange, 29 June and was buried at Snitterfield, 5 July 1872; will proved 11 September 1872 (effects under £25,000);
(2) Robert James Atty (1810-62) (q.v.);
(3) Henry Gould Atty (c.1811-32); died unmarried, aged 21, 'at his lodgings in the Bristol Road', Birmingham, 4 November and was buried at St Thomas, Birmingham, 13 November 1832;
(4) Harriet Caroline Atty (1814-1901), born 5 July and baptised at Snitterfield, 11 July 1814; inherited Ingon Grange in trust for her nephew on the death of her brother in 1862; died unmarried at Leamington Spa (Warks), 12 December and was buried at Snitterfield, 18 December 1901; administration of goods granted 29 July 1902 (estate £107,956);
(5) Margaretta Ellen Atty (1815-91), born 12 December and baptised at Snitterfield, 28 December 1815; died unmarried, 6 April and was buried at Snitterfield, 10 April 1891; will proved 24 May 1891 (effects £40,242);
(6) Augusta Jeanes Atty (1817-91), baptised at Snitterfield, 6 August 1817; died unmarried at Leamington Spa and was buried at Snitterfield, 10 April 1891; will proved 24 May 1892 (effects £29,166);
(7) William Frederick Willes Attye (1820-46), baptised at Snitterfield, 30 January 1820; an officer in the 31st regiment (Ensign, 1839; Lt., 1842) who saw extensive service in India and Afghanistan, being wounded in the action at Aliwal; died unmarried of fever in India, 8 May 1846; commemorated by a memorial window in Snitterfield church;
(8) Francis Edward Atty (b. & d. 1824), born March 1824; died in infancy, 25 November and was buried at Snitterfield, 29 November 1824;
(9) Col. Francis Lionel Octavius Atty (1830-85) (q.v.).
He purchased the Ingon Grange estate at Snitterfield and probably rebuilt the house there.
He died 1 May 1833 and was buried at Snitterfield, where he is commemorated by a monument. His widow died 25 November 1855 and is commemorated by a memorial window in Snitterfield church.

Attye, Robert James (1810-62). Eldest son of Robert Middleton Atty (1770-1833) and his wife Margaretta Lucy, youngest daughter of Ven. William Willes, archdeacon of Wells, baptised at Leamington Priors (Warks), 4 July 1810. Educated at Shrewsbury and St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1831; BA 1835). JP (from 1838) and DL (from 1852) for Warwickshire. An officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Cornet, 1845; Lt., 1848). A promoter of the Birmingham & Oxford Junction Railway, 1845. From about 1855 he began to routinely spell his name with a final 'e'. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited the Ingon Grange estate from his father in 1833. At his death it passed to his sister Harriet, apparently in trust for his nephew, although the latter was unborn at the time of his death.
He died 26 April 1862 and was buried at Snitterfield, where he is commemorated by a memorial window; administration of his goods was granted to his sister Harriet, 21 June 1862 (effects under £5,000).

Attye, Lt-Col. Francis Lionel Octavius (1830-85). Fifth and youngest son of Robert Middleton Atty (1770-1833) and his wife Margaretta Lucy, youngest daughter of Ven. William Willes, archdeacon of Wells, born 20 July and baptised at Snitterfield, 24 October 1830. An officer in the 2nd (Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot (Ensign, 1847; Lt., 1849; Capt., 1853; Major, 1861; Lt-Col., 1864; retired, 1865). JP for Warwickshire. Freemason, 1854-85. From about 1855 he began to routinely spell his name with a final 'e'. He married, 17 September 1861 at Carshalton (Surrey), Margaret Maria (1832-92), eldest daughter of David Lloyd of Carshalton, merchant, and had issue:
(1) Robert Jervoise Atty (1862-1916) (q.v.).
He died 22 August 1885 and was buried at Snitterfield, where he is commemorated by a memorial window; his will was proved 23 October 1885 (effects £3,772). His widow died 13 April 1892; administration of her goods was granted to her son, 11 June 1892 (effects £15,371) and 11 July 1896 to Contessa Guidoboni Visconti.

Attye, Robert Jervoise (1862-1916). Only son of Col. Francis Lionel Octavius Attye (1829-85) and his wife Margaret Maria, eldest daughter of David Lloyd of Carshalton (Surrey), born 9 July and baptised at Farnham (Surrey), 8 August 1862. Educated at Eton and Trinity Hall, Cambridge (matriculated 1882). JP for Warwickshire. An officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Lt., 1884). In 1900 he gave his address as the Cavalry Club in London, but he later became insane and was confined in the Chiswick House Asylum; an order in lunacy was granted in 1912. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited the Ingon Grange estate from his father in 1885 but sold the farming stock in 1887 and let the house from 1895. At his death the estate passed to his distant kinsman, Welby Robert Atty (1872-1949) (q.v.).
He died, following an operation, at Hafod-y-Bryn, Llanbedr (Merioneths), 28 July 1916; will proved 3 April 1917 (estate £188,902).

Atty, James (1768-1815). Eldest son of James Attye (1743-1814) and his wife Hannah, daughter of Robert Middleton, baptised at Whitby (Yorks), 17 November 1768. Sailmaker and shipowner at Whitby until about 1803. An officer in the Whitby Corps of Volunteers, (Capt-Lt., 1795), Royal North Lincolnshire Militia (Capt. 1803) and Grantham Regiment of Local Militia (Major, 1808). He married 1st, 28 November 1807 at Aswarby House, Henrietta (1788-1810), daughter of Sir Thomas Whichcote, 5th bt., of Aswarby Park (Lincs), and 2nd, 9 November 1813 at St Mary Magdalene, Lincoln, Catherine (1782-1864), daughter of Rev. Thomas Hall, rector of Westborough and vicar of Doddington (Lincs), and had issue:
(1.1) James Atty (1810-77) (q.v.);
(2.1) George Atty (1814-84), baptised at Scarborough (Yorks NR), 14 September 1814; educated at Brasenose and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford (matriculated 1833; BA 1837; MA) and Middle Temple (admitted, 1840; called to bar, 1849); barrister-at-law; freemason, 1845-64; died unmarried, 14 March 1884; administration of goods granted 16 September 1884 and 3 January 1885 (effects £57,122).
He lived at Ruswarpe in Whitby (Yorks) but about 1805 he appears to have sold his shipping interests at Whitby and bought an estate at Pinchbeck (Lincs). Through his second marriage he acquired further property at Doddington and Westborough and in Nottinghamshire.
He died 17 October and was buried at Whitby, 24 October 1815; his will was proved in the PCC, 7 May 1816. His first wife died 30 May 1810. His widow died at Southwell (Notts), 6 September 1864.

Atty, James (1810-77). Only son of James Attye (1768-1815) and his first wife, Henrietta, daughter of Sir Thomas Whichcote, 5th bt., of Aswarby Park (Lincs), born 21 April 1810. Educated at Rugby School (admitted 1823). An officer in 52nd Light Infantry (Ensign, 1828; Lt.; Capt.; retired c.1832), North Shropshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Cornet, 1843), Warwickshire Militia (Major, 1853) and Warwickshire Rifle Volunteers (Capt., 1859; Major, 1860). JP (from 1847) for Warwickshire and DL (from 1855) for Lincolnshire. Master of Flintshire Hounds, 1841-43. After moving to Rugby in 1845 he became an active promoter of railway projects, including the Manchester & Rugby Railway and the Rugby, Leamington & Warwick Railway. Chairman of the Rugby Board of Health, 1851-77. A Vice-President of the Shakespeare Tercentenary Celebrations Committee, 1864. He married, 31 May 1831, Catherine Adeline (d. 1889), daughter of Adlard Welby of South Rauceby (Lincs), and had issue:
(1) James Atty (1833-54), baptised at North Muskham (Notts), 24 April 1833; an officer in the 43rd regiment (Ensign, 1851; Lt.); died unmarried at Ventnor (Isle of Wight), 9 November and was buried at Rugby, 15 November 1854;
(2) Adeline Atty (1834-1915), baptised at North Muskham (Notts), 10 August 1834; married 1st, 1 February 1860 at St George's, Hanover Square, London, as his second wife, James Malcolm (1804-78) of Olrig, Victoria (Australia) and Kew (Surrey), and had issue two sons; married 2nd, 19 November 1885, John Ramsay L'Amy (1813-92) of Dunkenny (Angus) and Cavendish Hall (Suffk); died 28 February 1915; will proved 19 June 1915 (estate £10,749);
(3) Harriet Atty (1835-1919), born 6 October and baptised at Scarborough (Yorks), 2 November 1835; married, 4 January 1860 at Rugby, Capt. William Alexander Kerr VC (1831-1919) of Indian army; died 21 November 1919; will proved 5 March 1920 (estate £7,406);
(4) Mary Anne Atty (1837-66), born 23 June and baptised at Penley, 23 July 1837; died unmarried at Rugby, 14 February 1866;
(5) George Robert Atty (1838-48), born about December 1838 and baptised at Penley, 22 May 1839; died young of scarlet fever, 13 June 1848;
(6) Charles Atty (1839-82), born 15 December 1839 and baptised at Penley, 16 July 1840; educated at Rugby School (admitted 1850); an officer in Warwickshire militia (Ensign, 1857; Lt., 1858) and 47th regiment (Ensign, 1859; Lt., 1862; retired, 1869); died unmarried, 8 June and was buried at Rugby, 13 June 1882; administration of goods granted to his mother, 31 August 1882 (effects £210);
(7) Charlotte Atty (1841-64), born 19 October and baptised at Penley, 14 November 1841; married, 17 September 1863 at Rugby, Henry Darley (1839-1904) of Aldby Park (Yorks NR); died in London, 6 December 1864;
(8) Georgiana Atty (1843-1921), born 15 January and baptised at Penley, 31 May 1843; after the death of her mother she lived at Scarborough (Yorks NR); died unmarried, 21 October 1921; will proved 25 November 1921 (estate £6,670);
(9) Margaret Ellen Atty (1845-48), born 16 November and baptised at Rugby, 23 December 1846; died young of scarlet fever, 5 June 1848;
(10) Edward Arthur Atty (1847-80), born 16 March and baptised at Rugby, 21 April 1847; educated at Rugby School (admitted 1861); civil engineer; bankrupted 1874; married, 6 June 1869 at St Mark, Notting Hill (Middx), Florence Laura (1848-after 1911), daughter of James Walters Kelson, gent., and had issue one son and five daughters; died at Dinard St. Enogat (France), 12 October and was buried at Rugby, 18 October 1882;
(11) Robert Atty (1849-1911) (q.v.).
He inherited his father's property in Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire in 1815, and came of age at 25 in 1835. He lived at Penley Hall (Flints.), which he leased from the Dymock family, until 1845, and then moved to Rugby (Warks), where he lived latterly at 'Rosemont'. His widow lived at Rugby until her death.
He died at Rugby, 14 July 1877; his will was proved 6 September 1877 (effects under £2,000). His widow died 22 October 1889; her will was proved 18 January 1890 (effects £2,278).

Atty, Robert (1849-1911). Fifth and youngest son of James Atty (1810-77) and his wife Catherine Adeline, daughter of Adlard Welby of North Rauceby (Lincs), born 19 March and baptised at Rugby, 13 April 1849. Educated at Rugby School (admitted 1861). In 1876 he was fined for assaulting a clergyman at Rugby while drunk; by 1881 he seems to have been living apart from his wife; and on 7 December 1892 he was admitted to The Flower House Private Lunatic Asylum, Catford (Kent), where he spent the rest of his life. He married, 21 April 1870 at Shippon (Berks), Gertrude Hall (1844-87), daughter of Rev. Daniel Oliver Etough, and had issue:
(1) Gertrude Hall Attye (1871-1909), baptised 15 March 1871; married, 22 May 1902, Archibald Vaughan Campbell-Lambert of Foxearth Hall and had issue one son; died 6 April 1909; her will was proved 6 July 1909 (estate £1,093);
(2) Welby Robert Attye (1872-1949) (q.v.);
(3) Eleanor Etough Atty (1876-1944), baptised at Crick (Northants), 2 April 1876; died unmarried at Thornton-le-Dale (Yorks), 28 April 1944; will proved 4 July 1944 (estate £17,221).
He lived at Crick (Northants) and later at Rugby (Warks) until he was confined; his wife lived at Leamington (Warks). His property in Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire was transferred to trustees, who retained the estate until 1918, when it was sold.
He died 26 February 1911; administration of his goods (with will annexed) was granted to his son, 6 May 1911 (estate £4,474). His wife died suddenly at Hampden House, Sutton (Surrey), 18 November and was buried at Epsom (Surrey), 23 November 1887; her will was proved 23 January 1888 (effects £590).

Atty, Welby Robert (1872-1949). Only son of Robert Attye (1849-1911) and his wife Gertrude, daughter of Rev. Daniel Oliver Etough, born at Aldborough (Yorks), 1 April and baptised at Rugby (Warks), 19 May 1872. An officer in the 5th battn, Devonshire Regiment (2nd Lt, 1900; Lt., 1901; Capt., 1903; resigned 1904); served in First World War as a non-commissioned officer in the Royal Engineers (Lance-Sergeant; 2nd Lt. from 1917). A keen amateur golfer who had some success in championships in the 1890s. He married, 16 August 1902 at All Saints, Battersea (London), Freda Letitia (1876-1962), daughter of William White Brown, merchant, of Fox Burrow, Caterham (Surrey), and had issue:
(1) Daphne Freda Atty (1904-88), born 7 February 1904; emigrated permanently to Kenya, 1930; married, 5 January 1928 at Nakuru (Kenya), Percy Gunson (1900-83), son of William Gunson of Oaklands, Watton (Norfk), and had issue one son; buried at All Saints church, Limuru (Kenya), 1988;
(2) William James Welby Atty (1905-70), born March 1905; served in Second World War with RAF (Pilot Officer, 1940; Flying Officer, 1941); died in Kenya, 13 May 1970 and was buried at Kitale Cemetery;
(3) Eleanor Rosalind Atty (1920-91), born 4 March 1920; married, Apr-Jun 1941, Nigel Oglethorpe McLaughlan (1913-99) and had issue one daughter; died 29 May 1991; will proved 2 July 1991 (estate £261, 040). 
He lived at Seaforth Lodge, Seaton (Devon). When he inherited the Ingon Grange estate from his kinsman, Robert Jervoise Attye, in 1916 he continued to let it until it was sold it to the Misses Madeline and Marguerite Chadwick in 1923.
He died 15 December 1949; his will was proved 24 April 1950 (estate £149,873). His widow died 6 May 1962; her will was proved 31 August 1962 (estate £4,772).


Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1850, pp. 37-38; idem, 1925, p. 50; Stephanie K. Jones, 'A maritime history of the port of Whitby, 1700-1914', PhD thesis, University of London, 1982; Peter Bolton, The Lost Architectural Landscapes of Warwickshire: The South, 2003, pp. 79-80.


Location of archives


Atty of Ingon Grange: deeds and papers, 1681-1930 [Warwickshire Record Office, CR 2812]; estate papers, 19th-20th cents [Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon, DR27/11, DR42]


Coat of arms


Azure, a bend between two lions rampant, or.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Can anyone provide additional photographs of the early 19th century house at Ingon Grange, especially any interior views?
  • If you or your near relations appear above, please get in touch if you are able to provide fuller or more up-to-date information about recent generations of the family.



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 8 January and updated 15 January 2017. I am most grateful to Chris Pickford and Thomas Lloyd for their help with this account.