Monday, 21 April 2014

(119) Cracroft-Amcotts of Kettlethorpe and Hackthorn

Cracroft of Hackthorn
Amcotts of Kettlethorpe
This post concerns two families, initially quite distinct, but which became so closely entwined in the 18th and 19th centuries that it makes sense to tell their story together.

In 1618, John Cracroft (c.1559-1622) inherited estates around Lincoln at Hackthorn, Dunholme and Whisby in Doddington from his maternal uncle, Robert Grantham.  He is reputed to have built a new house at Hackthorn, but the record provided by baptisms, marriages, burials and wills suggests that the family was not firmly centred there until the end of the 17th century. Almost all trace of their first house has, however, vanished, replaced by a neo-classical villa built in 1793-95 by John Cracroft (1748-1821). The Hackthorn estate has passed in an orderly way from generation to generation for some four hundred years. Robert Cracroft (d. 1677) enhanced it by the acquisition through marriage of lands at nearby Fulnetby, and his grandson, Robert Cracroft (1703-63) acquired the West Keal Hall estate near Spilsby, also through marriage, but otherwise the estate remained largely unchanged until the 19th century.

The Amcotts family were established by the mid 16th century at nearby Aisthorpe, about three miles from Hackthorn as the crow flies. A descendant of this family, Vincent Amcotts (c.1625-86), who had apparently had a successful legal practice in London, bought Harrington Hall near Spilsby (Lincs) in 1673 and rebuilt it shortly afterwards. He died leaving a young family by his second wife, Amy, and left the house to her until such time as his heir should come of age. Amy married again, and by her second husband produced a son, Charles Hall (d. 1743), who inherited Kettlethorpe Hall from his father's family and probably largely rebuilt it. He died without issue and bequeathed Kettlethorpe to his half-brother's son, Charles Amcotts (1729-77) of Harrington Hall. In youth, Charles gained a reputation as a firebrand Jacobite, and had the distinction of being expelled from Cambridge University for drinking the health of the Young Pretender in 1749. He remained a Tory in politics, but became part of the county establishment, serving as High Sheriff, MP for Boston, and Colonel of the county militia. The one thing he omitted to do was to marry and have a family, so at his death his property was divided among his sisters. Anna-Maria (d. 1800), the wife of Sir Wharton Emerson - who promptly changed his name to Amcotts - received Kettlethorpe; and Frances (1726-c.1810), the wife of Edward Buckworth, got Harrington.

Sir Wharton Amcotts (1740-1807) and his wife produced an only daughter, Elizabeth (d. 1812), who married Sir John Ingilby (d. 1815), the illegitimate heir to the Ripley Castle estate in Yorkshire. When her mother died, she obtained royal licence to call herself Lady Amcotts-Ingilby (although she actually used the form Ingilby-Amcotts!), and her only surviving son and heir, who inherited the baronetcies of her father (by special remainder) and her husband, and both the Ripley Castle and Kettlethorpe Hall estates, was Sir William Amcotts-Ingilby (1783-1854), 2nd bt.  Curiously, he seems initially to have been very short of money, and he lived abroad from some years after 1812 to avoid his creditors, but by 1815 when he inherited his father's estates he was back in England and he became the radical Whig MP for Lincolnshire, 1823-32. He married twice but had no children, so when he died in 1854 his Lincolnshire estates passed to his nephew, Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1815-83) of Hackthorn Hall; this is where the two families join up.

Weston Cracroft-Amcotts also inherited the Hackthorn estate from his father in 1862. Perhaps because the classical house at Hackthorn was then very unfashionable, he chose to live at Kettlethorpe, which he extensively remodelled in 1863, giving the house its present form.  His eldest son and intended heir was Vincent (1845-81), who became a playwright in London, but died from an overdose of a sleeping draught shortly after he had leased a theatre to mount one of his plays.  When Weston Cracroft-Amcotts died two years later, he divided his estates between his two surviving sons. The elder, Edward Weston Cracroft (he dropped the Amcotts part of his surname) (1849-1933), received Hackthorn, and the younger, Frederick Augustus Cracroft-Amcotts (1853-97) got Kettlethorpe.  Frederick was killed in a hunting accident in 1897 and his widow remained at Kettlethorpe until her death in 1936, when it passed to her son, Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1888-1975), who had already inherited Hackthorn from his childless uncle.  Sir Weston made Hackthorn his home, and eventually sold Kettlethorpe in 1961.  Hackthorn passed to Bridget (1933-2008), the third of his four daughters, and her husband Robert Peel Charles Eley (1931-96), who took the name Cracroft-Eley. Their son, William Cracroft-Eley, is the present owner of Hackthorn Hall.



Harrington Hall, Lincolnshire


Harrington Hall in 1986. Image: Nicholas Kingsley. Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.

The house has a long west front and the part of this with a stone plinth marks the extent of the Tudor and Elizabethan house of the Copledyke family. Vincent Amcotts (c.1625-86) bought Harrington in 1673 and remodelled and extended the house over the next eight years, possibly to the designs of William Catlyn of Hull, who was building Brigg Grammar School at the time for a group of trustees of whom Amcotts was a member.  When the house was enlarged in the 1670s, the existing three-storey porch was retained, perhaps partly because it had relatively recently been rebuilt with Artisan Mannerist decoration of very elongated Ionic brick pilasters either side of the porch windows on the first and second floors, and perhaps partly  to provide a vertical accent in what would otherwise have been a long, low, rather monotonous facade. 


Harrington Hall in 1986: diaper work on the side of the porch betrays its Tudor origins. Image: Nicholas Kingsley
Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.

Either side of the porch there are six bay, two-storey ranges, with a projecting wooden modillion cornice, pitched roof and dormers.  The windows were altered later in the Georgian period, and perhaps at the same time a lower extension was added to the north end.  After that, the 19th and 20th centuries made only minor changes and additions, until in 1991 there was a disastrous fire while repairs were in hand for the present owners. Almost the entire interior was destroyed and the even the external shell was badly damaged, but both have been carefully restored by Guy Taylor Associates of Newark, which won a Europa Nostra award for the project.  The gardens were laid out in the 18th century, and have been enhanced in the last twenty years.  The west front faces a wide court with brick walls and gatepiers, the south wall of which is the boundary of an elevated terraced garden ornamented with rusticated piers and urns, added in 1722.  The terrace itself is 17th century and thought to have been built from the rubble of the old house.  The gardens have been open to the public for many years, but closed permanently at the end of 2013.


Harrington Hall, as depicted on the Ordnance Survey 6" map, 1887
Descent: Sir Roger Copledike (c.1316-63); to son, John Copledike (c.1338-80); to son, John Copledike (c.1360-1408); to son, William Copledike; to son, William Copledike (b. 1402); to son, John Copledike (1425-c.1488);... Sir John Copledike (d. 1557), who probably built the house c.1535; to son, John Copledyke (d. 1585); to brother, Francis Copledyke (d. 1599); to nephew, Edward Copledike (d. 1609); to widow for life and then (after much legal wrangling) to his brother Thomas Copledike (d. 1658); to widow, Mary Copledike, for life; to nephew, Hugh Bethell (fl. 1673), who sold 1673 to Vincent Amcotts (c.1625-86), who remodelled the house; to son, Vincent Amcotts (c.1683-1733); to son, Charles Amcotts (1729-77); to sister, Frances (c.1726-1810); to niece, Augusta (d. 1857), wife of Robert Cracroft of Hackthorn (1783-1862); to cousin, Rev. Sir Henry John Ingilby (1790-1870), 1st bt.; to son, Sir Henry Day Ingilby (1826-1911), 2nd bt.; sold c.1920 to Maj. Thomas Jessup; sold 1927 to Maj. W.H. Rawnsley of Well; sold c.1930 to Holliday Hartley and used in WW2 by an evacuated Barnado's Home from Sheffield; sold 1950 to Sir John Maitland MP (1903-77), kt.; to widow; sold after her death 1991 to David Price.


Kettlethorpe Hall, Lincolnshire




Kettlethorpe Hall: the 14th century gateway. Image: Richard Croft.
Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.
The house began in the 14th century as the home of the Swynford family, an association made famous by the marriage of Katharine Swynford to John of Gaunt, and more particularly by Anya Seton's novel about her.  Of this period, there remains only the stone gateway, with battlements and typical mouldings, which has been strengthened and repaired later in brick, and some remains of the moat.  There is also some old stonework in the south wall of the house itself, but otherwise the house dates largely from a rebuilding in the early 18th century, and especially from the last major remodelling in 1863. 
Kettlethorpe Hall as rebuilt in the early 18th century and remodelled in 1863.

Some earlier survivals include one room with reset 17th century panelling; the dining room which has Queen Anne panelling and a chimneypiece of c.1771 (for which there is a design in the Victoria & Albert Museum); and the adjacent room which has a very delicate stucco ceiling.  The original staircase of the 18th century house is said to be at Ripley Castle (Yorks), and was presumably moved in 1863.


Kettlethorpe Hall, as depicted on the Ordnance Survey 6" map, 1885 

Descent: Thomas Hall; to son, Charles Hall (d. 1743); to first cousin once removed, Charles Amcotts (1729-77); to sister, Anna-Maria (d. 1800), wife of Sir Wharton Emerson (later Amcotts) (1740-1807), 1st bt.; to daughter, Elizabeth (d. 1812), wife of Sir John Ingilby (d. 1815), 1st bt.; to son, Sir William Amcotts-Ingilby (1783-1854), 2nd bt.; to sister, Augusta (d. 1857), wife of Robert Cracroft (later Amcotts) (1783-1862); to son, Weston Cracroft Amcotts (1815-83); to son, Frederick Augustus Cracroft-Amcotts (1853-97); to widow (d. 1936); to son, Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1888-1975), kt, who sold 1961 to His Honour Edward Daly-Lewis (d. 1977); sold 1981 to C. Coulton; sold 1985 to Rt. Hon. Douglas Martin Hogg, 3rd Viscount Hailsham (b. 1945).


Hackthorn Hall, Lincolnshire


Hackthorn Hall in the 1790s: a sketch by Edmund Cracroft showing the new house, old church, and rectory in their newly-landscaped setting.



Hackthorn Hall: entrance front and west side, 2008. Image: East Yorkshire Local History Society

Little or nothing is known about the 17th century house of the Cracrofts. It was pulled down in 1793 to make way for the present four-square restrained neo-classical villa designed by James Lewis of London, which was built in 1793-95; a drawing of the completed house was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1798.  It is not clear how Lewis came to the attention of John Cracroft; in the next generation the two families were connected by marriage but there is nothing to suggest any earlier link and Hackthorn remains Lewis's only known Lincolnshire commission.  It may simply be that Cracroft had seen Lewis's book, Original Designs in Architecture, published in 1779-80. The new house was built in a pale Yorkshire stone, and is a square block with a long service wing added c.1858-60 on the east side. The north front has a semi-circular Ionic porch and windows in arched recesses and the south (garden) front has triangular pediments on alternate ground-floor windows, but otherwise the external decoration is minimal. 


Hackthorn Hall: garden front, 2009. Image: Thorpe. Licenced under this Creative Commons licence.

Inside, the rooms are grouped around an oval top-lit staircase.  North-east of the house stands a mid 18th century stable block, altered in the later 18th century, and forming a group with the church (rebuilt in 1844-49).  Nearby are an old barn and another stable, the sole survivors from the earlier complex of buildings. The grounds were landscaped when the house was rebuilt, and a sketch by Edmund Cracroft done in the 1790s shows the new house sitting alongside the old parish church and the rectory in a bare new landscaped setting.


Hackthorn Hall, as depicted on the Ordnance Survey 6" map, 1885-86.

Descent: John Cracroft (c.1559-1622); to son, Robert Cracroft (d. 1666); to grandson, Robert Cracroft (d. 1677); to son, Robert Cracroft (1676-1712); to son, Robert Cracroft (1703-63); to son, Robert Wilson Cracroft (1746-87); to brother, John Cracroft (1748-1821), who rebuilt the house; to son, Robert Cracroft (later Amcotts) (1783-1862); to son, Weston Cracroft Amcotts (1815-83); to son, Edward Weston Cracroft (1849-1933); to nephew, Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1888-1975); to daughter, Bridget Katharine (1933-2008), wife of Robert Peel Charles Cracroft-Eley (1931-96); to son, Charles William Amcotts Cracroft-Eley (b. 1963). 

Amcotts family of Harrington Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall


Amcotts, Vincent (1625-86), of Harrington Hall. Son of Vincent Amcotts (d. 1637/8) of Langton-by-Wragby (Lincs) and his wife Anne, daughter of Anthony Norton of Burton (Lincs), born 23 September 1625. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1648). He married 1st, 18 February 1668, Helen Webberley of East Kirkby (Lincs), and 2nd, about July 1675, Amy (1648-1712/3), daughter of Henry Mildmay of Graces, Little Baddow (Essex), and had issue:
(1.1) Elizabeth Amcotts (b. & d. 1669), baptised at Nettleham, 28 November 1669; died in infancy and was buried at Nettleham, 7 December 1669;
(2.1) Annie Amcotts (b. 1676), born 16 and baptised 17 April 1676; died before 1686;
(2.2) Vincent Amcotts (1679-80), baptised 25 June 1679; died in infancy and was buried 9 April 1680;
(2.3) Mary Amcotts (1681-87), born 2 February 1681; died unmarried, 18 November 1687;
(2.4) Vincent Amcotts (1683-1733) (q.v.);
(2.5) Henry Amcotts (1684-1705), born 21 January 1684; died unmarried and without issue, 18 May 1705; will proved in PCC, 13 June 1711.
He purchased Harrington Hall in 1673 and rebuilt the house. At his death he left his estates to his widow until his son achieved his majority.
He died 25 May 1686 and was buried at Harrington, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved 2 August 1686 and his inventory is here. His widow married 2nd, Thomas Hall of Kettlethorpe Hall and had issue a son, Charles Hall (d. 1743), who bequeathed Kettlethorpe to Charles Amcotts (1729-77) (q.v.). She died 20 February 1712/3.

Amcotts, Vincent (1683-1733), of Harrington Hall. Son of Vincent Amcotts (c.1625-86) and his second wife, Amy Mildmay, born 1683. Educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (admitted 1700) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1703). Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1726. He married, 18 May 1720, Elizabeth (c.1694-1765), daughter of Rev. John Quincey of Aslackby (Lincs), and had issue:
(1) Vincent Amcotts (1721-30), baptised 22 July 1721; died young, 23 May and was buried 26 May 1730;
(2) Elizabeth Amcotts (1723-62), baptised 9 October 1723; died unmarried, 10 May 1762;
(3) Anna Maria Amcotts (1725-1800), baptised 21 April 1725; married, 16 April 1762, Sir Wharton Emerson (later Amcotts) (q.v.) and had issue a daughter; died 1 July 1800;
(4) Frances Amcotts (1726-1810), baptised 3 November 1726; married, 1 August 1754, Edward or Everard Buckworth of Washingborough; inherited Harrington Hall from her brother in 1777; died without issue, 21 April 1810;
(5) Col. Charles Amcotts (1729-77) (q.v.).
He inherited Harrington Hall on the expiry of his mother's interest in 1704. 
He died 26 August and was buried at Harrington, 4 September 1733; his will was proved 11 February 1735/6. His widow was buried at Harrington, 19 July 1765.

Amcotts, Col. Charles (1729-77), of Harrington Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall. Second but only surviving son of Vincent Amcotts (1683-1733) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Quincey of Aslackby (Lincs), baptised 25 June 1729. Educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge (admitted 1746; sent down for drinking the health of the Young Pretender, 1749); created DCL by the University of Oxford, 8 July 1763. A 'notorious Jacobite', he became Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1753, Colonel of the Lincolnshire Militia, and Tory MP for Boston (Lincs), 1754-61, 1766-77; Alderman of Boston, 1774. He was unmarried.
He inherited Harrington Hall from his father in 1733 and Kettlethorpe Hall from his father's half-brother, Charles Hall, in 1743; he came of age in 1750. At his death, Kettlethorpe passed to his sister Anna-Maria and her husband and Harrington to his sister Frances and her husband.
He died 14 April 1777 and is buried at Harrington, where he is commemorated by a monument.

Amcotts (né Emerson), Sir Wharton (1740-1807), 1st bt., of Kettlethorpe Hall. Eldest son of Alexander Emerson (d. 1744) of East Retford (Notts) and Caister (Lincs) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Rev. Thomas Bosville of Ufford (Northants), born 23 February and baptised 24 February 1739/40. Served in 14th Foot (ensign, 1758; lieutenant, 1759; resigned 1760). Assumed the name of Amcotts in lieu of Emerson by royal licence, 13 May 1777, when his wife succeeded her brother in the Kettlethorpe estate.  MP for East Retford, 1780-90, 1796-1802; created a baronet, 11 May 1796. He married 1st, 16 April 1762, Anna Maria (1725-1800), daughter of Vincent Amcotts (1683-1733) of Harrington Hall, and 2nd, 20 October 1800, Amelia Theresa (d. 1833), daughter of Duncan Campbell of South Hall (Ayrshire), and had issue:
(1.1) Elizabeth Amcotts (later Ingilby, then Ingilby-Amcotts) (c.1763-1812) (q.v.);
(2.1) Sophia Louisa Emerson Amcotts (c.1804-33); married, 15 June 1826, Mathew (later Sir Mathew) Wilson (1802-91), 1st bt., son of Mathew Wilson of Eshton Hall (Durham), and had issue one son; died 29 September 1833.
He inherited house property at East Retford (Notts). His wife inherited the Kettlethorpe Hall estate in 1777. At her death it passed to their daughter.
He died at Scarborough, 26 September 1807, and was buried at East Retford (Notts), 5 October 1807.  He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his grandson, by special remainder. His first wife died 1 July 1800. His widow married, 2nd, 29 May 1809, Richard Bradley Wainman and was buried at Kildwick (Yorks), 19 July 1833.

Ingilby-Amcotts (née Amcotts, then Ingilby), Elizabeth (c.1763-1812) of Ingilby Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall. Daughter of Sir Wharton Amcotts (né Emerson) and his first wife, Anna Maria, daughter of Vincent Amcotts of Harrington Hall, born 24 June 1763. She assumed by royal licence, 3 October 1800, the surname Amcotts in addition to that of Ingilby. She married, 25 October 1780, Sir John Ingilby (1758-1815), 1st bt. of Ripley (Yorks) and had issue:
(1) John Ingilby (1781-92), born 12 and baptised 13 August 1781; died young, December 1792;
(2) Charles Amcotts Ingilby (b. & d. 1782), baptised 13 June 1782; died in infancy and was buried 15 June 1782;
(3) Sir William Ingilby (later Amcotts-Ingilby) (1783-1854), 2nd bt. (q.v.);
(4) Elizabeth Ingilby (b. 1784), born 11 May 1784;
(5) Augusta Ingilby (1786-1857), born 29 April and baptised 5 May 1786; married Robert Cracroft (1783-1862) of Hackthorn Hall (q.v.); inherited Kettlethorpe Hall from her brother in 1854; died 16 January 1857;
(6) Anna-Maria Ingilby; died in infancy;
(7) Anne Ingilby (d. 1790); died young in 1790;
(8) Diana Ingilby (1790-1841), born 16 and baptised 19 September 1790; married, April 1814, William Gunning-Campbell of Fairfield (Scotland); died 1841;
(9) Vincent Bosville Ingilby (1792-93), born 17 November and baptised 21 December 1792; died young in 1793;
(10) Julia Wharton Ingilby (1794-1836), born 12 February and baptised April 1794; married, 24 October 1816, Rear-Adm. Sir Robert Barrie RN and had issue one son and four daughters; died November 1836;
(11) Constance Ingilby (1795-1877), born 26 July 1795; married, 5 July 1819, Dr. Mark Theodore de Morlat MD; died 22 October 1877.
She inherited the Kettlethorpe Hall estate from her mother in 1800.  At her death it passed to her son.
She died 21 September 1812; her will was proved 27 October 1812. Her widower died 13/14 May 1815.


Political cartoon of Sir William Amcotts-Ingilby
Amcotts-Ingilby (né Ingilby), Sir William (1783-1854), 2nd bt., of Ingilby Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall. Only surviving son of Sir John Ingilby (d. 1815), 1st bt. of Ingilby Hall (Yorks) and his wife, Elizabeth Ingilby-Amcotts, daughter of Sir Wharton Amcotts, 1st bt., of Kettlethorpe Hall, born 20 June 1783.  Educated at Louth Grammar School. He succeeded his grandfather as 2nd bt. of Kettlethorpe by special remainder in 1807, and his father, also as 2nd bt. of Kettlethorpe, in 1815. Lieutenant in West Riding Yeomanry, 1803; High Sheriff of Yorkshire, 1821-22; MP for East Retford, 1807-12, Lincolnshire, 1823-32 and North Lincolnshire, 1832-35. Although apparently in youth a Tory, he became a radical Whig in politics, consistently supporting the cause of reform (and going so far as to support petitions for the introduction of the secret ballot), the abolition of slavery, Catholic emanicipation, and raising the living standards of working people. He had a reputation for drinking, gambling and eccentricity, and more than once was mistaken for a ‘poor farming-like sort of person’; his cigar-smoking, bizarre taste in cheap hats and facetiousness at political meetings endeared him to his constituents but made him the butt of political cartoonists. He assumed the name of Amcotts in addition to Ingilby on the death of his mother in 1812, and this was confirmed by royal licence, 11 April 1822.  In 1812 he slipped abroad to avoid his creditors and he may have stayed abroad until he succeeded his father in 1815. He enjoyed Continental travel and later visited Italy and Alsace-Lorraine, and in 1818 he was in Vienna. He married 1st, 18 April 1822, Louisa (d. 1836), daughter of John Atkinson of Maple Hayes (Staffs) and 2nd, 27 July 1843, Mary Anne, daughter of John Clementson, serjeant-at-arms to the House of Commons, but had no issue.
He inherited the Kettlethorpe Hall estate from his mother in 1812 and Ripley Castle from his father in 1815. At his death Kettlethorpe passed to his nephew, Weston Cracroft-Amcotts of Hackthorn Hall (q.v.) and Ripley to his cousin, Rev. Henry John Ingilby, "because I don't believe that you are any longer the canting hypocrite I took you for".
He died in London, 14 May 1854, when the baronetcies became extinct. His first wife died 22 July 1836. His widow's date of death is unknown.


Cracroft (later Cracroft-Amcotts) family of Hackthorn Hall



Cracroft, John (c.1559-1622), of Hackthorn and Dunholme. Elder son of Francis Cracroft (d. 1570) of Winthorpe (Lincs) and his first wife, Katherine, daughter of Hugh Grantham of Dunholme (Lincs), born about 1559. He married Elizabeth (1563-1602), daughter of William Beverley of North Grimston (Yorks), and had issue:
(1) Robert Cracroft (d. 1667) (q.v.);
(2) John Cracroft (d. before 1634);
(3) William Cracroft (d. 1637/8), of Cold Hanworth (Lincs); married before 1624, Elizabeth [surname unknown] and had issue one son; died 1 March 1637/8;
(4) Francis Cracroft (d. 1671), of Metheringham and Washingborough (Lincs); educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1622); married, 20 November 1623, Jane Waterhouse (d. 1641) and had issue seven sons and two daughters; buried at Spalding (Lincs), 28 May 1671;
(5) Bridget Cracroft; married (after 1621) [forename unknown] Dickenson;
(6) Elizabeth Cracroft; married (before 1621), Thomas Appleby;
(7) Anne Cracroft (d. 1656); married (before 1616), Charles Wilson of Sheepwash (Lincs); died 1656 and was buried at Canwick (Lincs); will proved 26 November 1656;
(8) Jane Cracroft (d. 1635); married, 22 January 1617/8, Michael Lawes of Lincoln, plumber; buried 3 April 1635;
(9) Catherine Cracroft; married, 30 June 1625, Edward Monke of Broughton (Lincs).
He inherited Hackthorn, Whisby in Doddington Pigot and Dunholme from his uncle, Robert Grantham of Black Monks, Lincoln, in 1618.
He was buried at Dunholme (Lincs), 6 November 1622; his will was proved 28 November 1622 and an inquisition post mortem was held at Sleaford, 19 June 1623. His wife died 23 August 1602 and was buried at North Grimston (Yorks).

Cracroft, Robert (d. 1667), of Hackthorn and Dunholme. Eldest son of John Cracroft (d. 1622) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of William Beverley of North Grimston (Yorks). He married, 28 February 1608/9, Martha (d. 1667), daughter of Sir Richard Amcotts KB of Aisthorpe (Lincs), and had issue:
(1) Robert Cracroft (1610-47) (q.v.);
(2) Mary Cracroft (b. 1611; fl. 1667), baptised at Aisthorpe, 28 March 1611; married, 22 October 1640, Rev. John Shelton and had issue a son;
(3) John Cracroft (c.1616-67); buried 17 August 1667; administration granted 6 September 1667;
(4) Elizabeth Cracroft (b. c.1615/6; fl. 1667), baptised at Wickenby (Lincs), 17 March 1615/6; married William Bedell;
(5) Richard Cracroft (1617-c.1685), baptised at Cold Hanworth (Lincs), 16 November 1617, innkeeper of Old White Hart, Lincoln; married Susannah [surname unknown] (d. 1666);
(6) Jane Cracroft (b. 1623; fl. 1667), baptised at Doddington Pigot (Lincs), 3 November 1623; married Francis Bland of Hablesthorp (Notts);
(7) Martha Cracroft (b. 1625; fl. 1684), baptised at Doddington Pigot, 8 January 1625; married (before 1666/7), Edward Barker;
(8) Thomas Cracroft (1628-81), baptised at Doddington Pigot, 8 April 1628; married Mary Whelpdale; will proved at Lincoln, 18 March 1680/81;
(9) Henry Cracroft (b. 1631), baptised at Doddington Pigot, 15 August 1631.
He inherited the Hackthorn and Dunholme estates from his father in 1622.
He was buried at Dunholme (Lincs), 14 September 1667; his will was proved at Lincoln, 19 November 1667. His wife was buried at Dunholme, 25 August 1667. The deaths of Robert, his wife and their son John in a short period in the autumn of 1667 suggest that they may have died of an infectious disease, perhaps even of the plague, which continued to break out across England that year.

Cracroft, Robert (1610-47). Eldest son of Robert Cracroft (d. 1666) and his wife Martha, daughter of Sir Richard Amcotts of Aisthorpe (Lincs), baptised at Aisthorpe, 4 May 1610. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1629). He married, 4 April 1636 at Lockington (Yorks), Margaret (d. 1655), daughter of Richard Remington of Lund (Yorks) and had issue:
(1) Robert Cracroft (d. 1677) (q.v.);
(2) Margaret Cracroft (fl. 1652);
(3) Mary Cracroft (fl. 1652).
He died in the lifetime of his father and was buried at St Mary-le-Wigford, Lincoln, 23 August 1647.  A grant of administration was issued for his widow on 3 October 1655.

Cracroft, Robert (d. 1677), of Hackthorn Hall. Only son of Robert Cracroft (1610-47) and his wife Margaret, daughter of Richard Remington of Lund (Yorks).  He married, 8 October 1664, Anne (1646-1717), daughter and co-heir of John Lodington of Fulnetby (Lincs) and had issue including:
(1) Mary Cracroft (b. 1665), baptised at Rand (Lincs), 4 November 1665;
(2) John Cracroft (1668-71), baptised at Hackthorn, 15 December 1668; died in infancy and was buried there, 17 January 1670/1;
(3) Richard Cracroft (1672-73), baptised at Hackthorn, 24 December 1672; died in infancy was buried there, 2 January 1672/3;
(4) Anne Cracroft (fl. 1681);
(5) Margaret Cracroft (fl. 1681); married, 2 August 1701, John Badisford;
(6) Jane Cracroft (b. 1674), baptised at Hackthorn, 9 April 1674; married, 9 July 1701 and Thurgarton (Notts), Robert Wilson;
(7) Elizabeth Cracroft (b. 1675), baptised at Hackthorn, 9 September 1675
(8) Robert Cracroft (1676-1712) (q.v.).
He inherited Hackthorn Hall from his grandfather in 1666 and Fulnetby in right of his wife.
He was buried at Hackthorn, 2 June 1677. His widow married 2nd, 1681, Francis Grantham of Wragby (Lincs).

Cracroft, Robert (1676-1712), of Hackthorn Hall and Fulnetby. Only surviving son of Robert Cracroft (d. 1677) and his wife Anne, daughter and co-heir of John Lodington of Fulnetby (Lincs), baptised at Hackthorn, 17 January 1676/7. He married, 2 October 1701, Grace (d. 1709), daughter of Rev. John Baxter of Lincoln, and had issue:
(1) Robert Cracroft (1703-63) (q.v.);
(2) Elizabeth Cracroft (1704-84), baptised at Hackthorn, 6 April 1703/4; died unmarried and was buried at Hackthorn, 19 July 1784;
(3) John Cracroft (1705-63), baptised at Hackthorn, 2 April 1705; married Sarah Edmonds (d. 1764); died 20 April 1763 and was buried at Louth; his will was proved 21 October 1763;
(4) Edward Cracroft (b. 1706), baptised at Hackthorn, 11 July 1706;
(5) Thomas Cracroft (d. 1708), buried at Hackthorn, 6 April 1708;
(6) Grace Cracroft (1708-76) of Louth, baptised at Hackthorn, 12 April 1708; died unmarried and was buried at Hackthorn, 9 February 1776; will proved 24 May 1776.
He inherited Hackthorn Hall and Fulnetby from his father in 1677.
He was buried at Hackthorn, 29 May 1712. His wife was buried at Hackthorn, 16 July 1709.

Cracroft, Robert (1703-63), of Hackthorn Hall. Eldest son of Robert Cracroft (1676-1712) and his wife Grace, daughter of Rev. John Baxter of Lincoln, born 6 February 1702/3 and baptised at Hackthorn.  He married 1st, 3 March 1729 Anne (1713-38), daughter and heiress of Martin Browne of Louth (Lincs) and 2nd, 30 May 1746, Rebecca (1722-1802), daughter of Edward Waldegrave of Louth and niece and heiress of Rev. Dr. Bernard Wilson of West Keal Hall (Lincs), vicar of Newark, and had issue:
(1.1) Anne Cracroft (b. & d. 1732), born at Louth (Lincs), 6 July 1732 and buried there, 23 August 1732;
(1.2) Anne Cracroft (c.1734-68), born about 1734; married, January 1767, Rev. John Langhorne (1735-79), formerly tutor to her father's second family and translator of Plutarch's Lives, and had issue; died 4 May 1768;
(1.3) Grace Cracroft (1735-90), born at Louth, 19 September 1735; married, 18 August 1757, William Marshall (1723-70) of Theddlethorpe (Lincs) and had issue; died at Louth, 3 June 1790;
(1.4) Mary Cracroft (1737-1809), born at Louth, 7 June 1737; married, 19 May 1766, John Nelthorpe (1736-84) of Little Grimsby Hall (Lincs) and had issue a daughter (Maria Janetta, who married 8th Duke of St. Albans); died at Lincoln, 12 January 1809 and was buried at Little Grimsby, 17 January 1809;
(2.1) Robert Wilson Cracroft (1746-87), of Hackthorn and Denham Court (Bucks), baptised at Louth, 10 March 1746; died unmarried at High Wycombe (Bucks), 27 February 1787 and was buried at Hackthorn, 15 March 1787; will proved 18 March 1787;
(2.2) John Cracroft (b. 1748) (q.v.);
(2.3) Thomas Cracroft (1749-1813) of West Keal Hall, baptised at Louth, 12 September 1749; married Elizabeth (d. 1807), daughter of Bentley Bennett of Keddington (Lincs) and had issue six sons and seven daughters; died at West Keal (Lincs), May 1813;
(2.4) Edward Cracroft (1750-63), baptised at Louth, 18 November 1750; died young and was buried at Hackthorn, 23 December 1763;
(2.5) Rev. Bernard Cracroft (1753-1821), baptised 1 February 1753; rector of Rippingale, East Keal and South Elkington (Lincs); married Mary Bennett (d. 1837) and had issue four sons and three daughters; died suddenly in Horbling church, 6 May 1821;
(2.6) Charles Cracroft (1754-1829), baptised at Louth, 2 June 1754; married, 3 October 1786, Dorothy Watkins (1769-1802) and had issue two sons and one daughter; died at Banff, 8 September 1829;
(2.7) Francis Tyrwhit Cracroft (b. 1755), baptised at Louth, 5 October 1755; emigrated to Baltimore (Maryland, USA); married Elizabeth [surname unknown] and had issue one son and two daughters;
(2.8) William Cracroft (b. 1757), baptised at Louth, 16 September 1757; married Elizabeth Sewell (d. 1837), daughter of Joseph Hawkes of London, merchant, and had issue two sons and four daughters;
(2.9) Elizabeth Clementina Cracroft (1760-71), baptised at Hackthorn, 13 October 1760; buried there 14 December 1771;
(2.10) Lt. Edmund Cracroft (1762-1830), baptised at Hackthorn, 2 July 1762; an officer in the Bengal Infantry; married, 6 October 1806, Sarah Lightburn (d. 1850) and had issue six sons and three daughters; died at Worcester, 1830.
He inherited the Hackthorn Hall estate from his father in 1712 and West Keal in right of his second wife.
He was buried at Hackthorn, 9 August 1763; his will was proved 11 April 1764.  His widow was buried at Hackthorn, 9 October 1802 and her will was proved at Lincoln the same day.

Cracroft, John (1748-1821), of Hackthorn Hall. Elder son of Robert Cracroft (b. 1702) and his second wife, Rebecca Waldegrave, baptised at Louth, 11 October 1748. High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1797. He married, 4 February 1782, Penelope Anne (d. 1821), daughter of Rev. Charles Fleetwood Weston of Somersby Hall (Lincs), rector of Therfield (Herts) and prebendary of Durham, and had issue:
(1) Robert Cracroft (later Cracroft-Amcotts) (1783-1862) (q.v.);
(2) Rev. John Cracroft (1784-1842); married 1st, 1807, Eliza Anne (d. 1811), daughter of James Lewis, architect, of Powis Place, London and had issue a daughter; married 2nd, 10 November 1814, Jane (d. 1857), daughter of Hezekiah Brown of Minster Yard, Lincoln, and had issue three sons and three daughters; died at Neuwied-am-Rhine (Germany), 21 September 1842; grant of administration of his goods, 2 September 1843;
(3) Penelope Anne Cracroft (1789-1861), baptised at Hackthorn, 5 July 1789; died unmarried in London, 10 May 1861;
(4) Emily Cracroft (1790-1828), baptised at Hackthorn, 30 August 1790; died unmarried, December 1828 and was buried at Hackthorn;
(5) Lucy Cracroft (1792-1870), baptised at Hackthorn, 11 June 1792; died unmarried in London, 11 May 1870;
(6) Arabella Cracroft (1801-73), baptised at Hackthorn, 22 July 1801; married, 1823, Matthew Henry Lister (1801-76) of Burwell Park and had issue; died 1 September 1873.
He inherited the Hackthorn and West Keal estates from his father, and rebuilt Hackthorn Hall to the designs of James Lewis.
He died 2 October 1821 and was buried at Hackthorn; his will was proved 14 November 1821. His wife died 29 September 1821 and was also buried at Hackthorn.

Cracroft-Amcotts (né Cracroft), Col. Robert (1783-1862), of Hackthorn Hall. Elder son of John Cracroft (b. 1748) of Hackthorn Hall and West Keal and his wife Penelope Anne, daughter of Rev. Charles Fleetwood Weston of Somersby Hall (Lincs) and rector of Therfield (Herts), born 25 January 1783.  He assumed the name and arms of Amcotts by royal licence in 1854. JP and DL for Lincolnshire. He married, 14 June 1814, Augusta Amcotts-Ingilby (d. 1857), daughter of Sir John Ingilby, 1st bt., of Ripley (Yorks) and Kettlethorpe (Lincs) (q.v.) and had issue:
(1) Weston Cracroft Amcotts (1815-83) (q.v.);
(2) Capt. Peter Cracroft-Amcotts (1816-65) CB RN, born 15 March and baptised at Harrington, 16 March 1816; Captain in the Royal Navy; married, 8 November 1851, Caroline (d. 1879), daughter of Sir Samuel Scott, 2nd bt. of Lytchett Minster (Dorset); died without issue at Port Royal (Jamaica), 2 August 1865;
(3) twin, Frances Amcotts Cracroft-Amcotts (1817-91), baptised at Harrington, 1 March 1817; married, 1841, Rev. Edwin Jarvis (1816-76), vicar of Hackthorn (Lincs) and rector of Cold Hanworth (Lincs), son of Col. George Ralph Payne Jarvis of Doddington Hall, and had issue; died 11 February 1891;
(4) twin, Augusta Cracroft-Amcotts (1817-55), baptised at Harrington, 1 March 1817; married, 1840, Rev. Charles Macquarie Jarvis (1804-63), rector of Doddington (Lincs), son of Col. George Ralph Payne Jarvis of Doddington Hall; died without issue, 1855;
(5) Louisa Cracroft-Amcotts (1819-1911), baptised at Harrington, 12 May 1819; married, 1 January 1846, Gervase Tottenham Waldo-Sibthorp MP (1815-61) of Canwick Hall and had issue; died 27 November 1911;
(6) Constance Elizabeth Cracroft-Amcotts (1821-98), baptised at Harrington, 22 April 1821; married, 17 February 1859, Capt. Charles Edmund Tennant RN (d. 1862) of Needwood House (Staffs) and had issue; died 26 October 1898;
(7) Rev. Robert Wentworth Cracroft-Amcotts (1826-1905), born 15 June and baptised 4 July 1826; rector of Harrington and Brinkhill (Lincs); married, 7 July 1864, Hon. Elizabeth Caroline Lane-Fox (d. 1879), daughter of Sackville Walter Lane-Fox MP and sister of Sackville George Lane-Fox, 12th Baron Conyers; died without issue, 22 March 1905.
He inherited the Hackthorn Hall estate from his father and the Kettlethorpe Hall estate in right of his wife in 1854.
He died 3 September 1862; his will was proved 10 October 1862 (estate under £35,000). His wife died 16 January 1857.

Cracroft-Amcotts, Weston (1815-83), of Hackthorn Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall. Eldest son of Col. Robert Cracroft (later Cracroft-Amcotts) (1783-1862) of Hackthorn Hall and his wife Augusta, daughter of Sir John Ingilby, 1st bt. of Ripley (Yorks) and Kettlethorpe Hall (Lincs), born 9 March 1815. Educated at Eton. JP and DL for Lincolnshire; High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1861; MP for Mid Lincolnshire, 1868-74; Lt-Col. of North Lincolnshire Militia. He married 1st, 16 May 1834 at Leominster (Herefs), Williama Emma (d. 1861), second daughter and co-heir of William George Cherry of Buckland (Herefs) and 2nd, 21 April 1864, Ellen Kempthorne (d. 1881), daughter of Rev. Charles Bryan of Woolaston (Glos) and widow of Henry Nevile of Wellingore Hall (Lincs), and had issue:
(1.1) Vincent Amcotts Cracroft-Amcotts (1845-81); educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford (matriculated 1863; BA 1867) and the Inner Temple (admitted 1867); playwright and classical dramatist; JP and DL for Lincolnshire; died unmarried in London from an overdose of chloral hydrate, 26 November 1881; will proved 7 January 1882 (estate £1,626);
(1.2) Edward Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (later Cracroft) (1849-1933) (q.v.);
(1.3) Frederick Augustus Cracroft-Amcotts (1853-97) (q.v.).
He inherited the Hackthorn and Kettlethorpe estates from his father.  At his death he left Hackthorn to his elder, and Kettlethorpe to his younger, surviving son.
He died at Harrogate (Yorks), 14 July 1883; his will was proved 22 August 1883 (estate £20,363). His first wife died 9 July 1861 and his second wife on 9 February 1881.

Cracroft (né Cracroft-Amcotts), Edward Weston (1849-1933), of Hackthorn Hall. Elder surviving son of Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1815-83) and his first wife Williama Emma, daughter and co-heir of William George Cherry of Buckland (Herefs), born 5 January 1849. Educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. JP for Lincolnshire; High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1893. He discontinued the use of the surname Amcotts in 1885, reverting to Cracroft. He married, 24 April 1879, Cecily Sophia Mary (d. 1919), daughter of Henry Nevile of Walcot Hall (Northants) and Wellingore Hall (Lincs), but had no issue.
He inherited Hackthorn Hall from his father in 1883.  At his death it passed to his nephew, Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (q.v.).
He died 30 January 1933; his will was proved 5 May 1933 (estate £70,965). His wife died 22 January 1919.

Cracroft-Amcotts, Maj. Frederick Augustus (1853-97), of Kettlethorpe Hall. Youngest son of Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1815-83) and his first wife Williama Emma, daughter and co-heir of William George Cherry of Buckland (Herefs), born 3 May 1853. Major in 5th Dragoon Guards; resigned his commission to become a rancher in Montana, USA; JP for Lincolnshire. He married, 17 February 1885, Emily Grace (d. 1936), youngest daughter of Anthony Peacock (later Willson) of Rauceby Hall (Lincs), and had issue:
(1) Sylvia Cracroft-Amcotts (1886-1940), born 22 August 1886; married, 7 August 1919, George William Henderson (d. 1934) of Rauceby Hall (Lincs) and had issue; died 14 May 1940; will proved 26 July 1940 (estate £23,064);
(2) Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1888-1975) (q.v.);
(3) Lt-Cdr. John Cracroft-Amcotts (1891-1956) of Rauceby Hall (Lincs), born 3 January 1891; educated at HMS Britannia; Lieutenant-Commander in Royal Navy; JP for Kesteven; High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1937; married, 12 February 1930, May (1895-1979), daughter of H. Redfearn-Shaw and widow of Frederic Martin Campbell and had issue three daughters; died 30 May 1956; will proved 7 November 1956 (estate £102,491).
He inherited Kettlethorpe Hall from his father in 1883. At his death it passed to his widow for life.
He died in a hunting accident at Baumber (Lincs), 15 April 1897; his will was proved 23 July 1897 (estate £2,556). His widow died 13 October 1936; her will was proved 29 April 1937 (estate £29,812).

Cracroft-Amcotts, Sir Weston (1888-1975), kt., of Hackthorn Hall and Kettlethorpe Hall. Elder son of Maj. Frederick Augustus Cracroft-Amcotts (1853-97) and his wife Emily Grace, daughter of Anthony Willson of Rauceby Hall (Lincs), born 7 November 1888. Educated at Eton and Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. Served in Royal Engineers, 1906-42 (Lt-Col; MC); JP and DL for Lincolnshire; High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1954; Chairman of Parts of Lindsey County Council; knighted, 1954. He married, 23 June 1927, Rhona (1901-97), only daughter of Edward Clifton Clifton-Brown of Burnham Grove (Bucks) and had issue:
(1) Rosemary Grace Cracroft-Amcotts (b. 1928), born 17 April 1928; married, 24 May 1952, Lt-Cdr. Gervis Hugh Frere Frere-Cook RN (d. 1974) and had issue two sons and one daughter;
(2) Marian Cicely Cracroft-Amcotts (b. 1931), born 13 September 1931; married, 15 June 1957, Thomas Charles Weguelin Micklem, son of Maj. Charles Micklem of Long Cross House, Chertsey (Surrey) and had issue one son and two daughters;
(3) Bridget Katharine Cracroft-Amcotts (1933-2008) (q.v.); 
(4) Penelope Sylvia Cracroft-Amcotts (b. 1938), born 20 May 1938.
He inherited Hackthorn Hall from his uncle in 1933 and Kettlethorpe Hall from his mother in 1936; he sold Kettlethorpe in 1961.
He died in July-September 1975.

Cracroft-Eley (né Cracroft-Amcotts), Bridget Katharine (1933-2008). Third daughter of Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts (1888-1975) and his wife Rhona, only daughter of Edward Clifton Clifton-Brown of Burnham Grove (Bucks), born at Hertford, 29 October 1933.  High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1989; Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire, 1995-2008, being the first woman to hold that office; High Steward of Lincoln Cathedral, 1998-2008. Appointed CVO, 2008 and Hon. LLD of De Montfort University, 2003. She married, 31 October 1959, Robert Peel Charles Eley (1931-96), elder son of Charles Ryves Maxwell Eley OBE of East Bergholt Place (Suffolk) and had issue:
(1) Annabel Louise Cracroft Cracroft-Eley (b. 1961), born 15 January 1961; married, 1987, Andrew Stewart Ross Jones, son of R.H. Jones of London, and had issue one son and one daughter;
(2) Charles William Amcotts Cracroft-Eley (b. 1963) (q.v.).
She inherited Hackthorn Hall from her father in 1975.
She died 29 August 2008. Her husband died 22 December 1996.

Cracroft-Eley, Charles William Amcotts (b. 1963) of Hackthorn Hall.  Only son of Robert Peel Charles Cracroft-Eley and his wife Bridget Katharine, daughter of Sir Weston Cracroft-Amcotts of Hackthorn Hall, born 8 March 1963.  He married, 1991 at Pershore (Worcs), Margaret Elizabeth, daughter of Roger Lole of Hermitage Farm, Wadborough (Leics), and had issue:
(1) Florence Elizabeth Cracroft-Eley (b. 1994), born 3 June 1994;
(2) Cecily Ophelia Violet Cracroft-Eley (b. 1996), born 5 February 1996;
(3) Elfreda Queenie Theodora Cracroft-Eley (b. 2000), born 24 January 2000.
He inherited Hackthorn Hall from his mother in 2008.
Now living.


Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1965, pp. 16-17; P. Cracroft-Brennan, Three Black Birds: the 900-year history of a Lincolnshire family, 2003, vols 2-3; Sir H.M. Colvin, Biographical dictionary of British architects, 4th edn., 2008, pp. 649-51; http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/member/amcotts-ingilby-sir-william-1783-1854


Location of archives


Cracroft-Amcotts family of Kettlethorpe etc: deeds, estate and legal papers, family and personal papers, 1409-20th cent. [Lincolnshire Archives, AMC, 2 AMC, MARTIN]; miscellaneous deeds and papers, 12th-19th cent. [West Yorkshire Archives Service, Leeds, WYL230].


Coat of arms


Amcotts: Argent, a tower triple-towered, between three covered cups azure.
Cracroft: Vert, on a bend dancettée, three martlets sable.
Cracroft-Amcotts: The two shields quartered with Amcotts in the 1st and 4th quarters and Cracroft 2nd and 3rd.

Friday, 18 April 2014

(118) Altham of Mark Hall, Oxhey Place and Timbercombe

The Althams were prominent citizens of London in the 16th century. James Altham (d. 1583/4) purchased the Mark Hall estate in Latton (Essex) in 1562, where there was a large Tudor courtyard house in which he entertained Queen Elizabeth no less than three times in the 1570s. His eldest son became a Roman Catholic and was excluded from the succession on that account, so Mark Hall passed to his second son, Edward Altham (d. 1605). James's youngest son, Sir James Altham (c.1555-1617), became a successful lawyer and judge and he and his son, Sir James Altham (d. 1624) lived at Oxhey Place in Hertfordshire.  Mark Hall passed in turn to two of Edward Altham's sons, Sir James Altham (1572-1610) and Sir Edward Altham (d. 1632), and then to the latter's son, Sir James Altham (1614-76), who was an active Royalist and was made a Knight of the Bath at the Restoration for his part in the Civil War. Sir James died without male issue and Mark Hall passed to his brother Leventhorpe Altham (1618-81), a London wine merchant, who was succeeded in turn by his son James Altham (1662-97) and grandson Peyton Altham (1695-1741).  Three of the latter's sons inherited in turn, the last of whom, Sir William Altham (1736-1818) altered the house before selling the estate in 1778 to his cousin William Lushington (1748-1823); Lushington rebuilt the house but sold it in 1786.  Sir William, who was unmarried, lived later at The White House, Thetford (Norfolk) and served as mayor of that town in 1793.

The eldest daughter of James Altham (1662-97), Mary Altham (1688-1752), married her kinsman, the Rev. Dr. Roger Altham, Archdeacon of Middlesex, and their eldest son, Roger Altham (1718-88) was a successful canon lawyer. His wife inherited a share in the Fenton House estate in Northumberland, which was sold by his daughter's trustees in 1829. The Althams might have faded into obscurity but for Maj. William Surtees Altham Cook (1813-87), who substituted the name Altham for Cook in 1862 and purchased the Timbercombe estate in Somerset in 1871. His second son was Lt-Gen. Sir Edward Altham Altham (1856-1943), who rose to prominence in the First World War.  His youngest son was Harry Surtees Altham (1888-1965), a schoolmaster at Winchester College who was a noted cricket writer and served as President of the MCC in 1959-60.


Mark Hall, Latton, Essex


Mark Hall shown on an estate map of 1616 (Essex RO D/DAr P1)

The manor house was first mentioned in 1270, but in 1422 it was described as ruinous. A new house was probably built in the early 16th century, as cellars of that date were recorded in 1921. Lord Morley, the lessee, was living at Mark Hall in 1538, and James Altham entertained Elizabeth I there in 1571, 1576, and 1578.  An old watercolour (the current whereabouts of which I have been unable to trace, but which was reproduced in the Essex Review in 1908) shows the house to have been laid out round a courtyard, with a main hall building with a porch and two cross-wings occupying one side, a gatehouse block on the far side of the court, and ranges of lodgings, stables and barns connecting the two.


The 16th century Mark Hall from an old watercolour, reproduced from the Essex Review, 1908

Considerable alterations to the house and grounds were made by William Altham shortly before 1771, when Mark Hall was said to be 'singular in its construction, though not disagreeable to the eye'. William Lushington, who bought the estate in 1778, built a new two storey classical house, with a double-bowed front, to the west of the old site. He also began enlarging and landscaping the park, diverting the road past the church for the purpose, and demolishing the 'small but elaborate' Jacobean Latton Hall in the process. 


Mark Hall in about 1930.

Montagu Burgoyne is said to have spent £30,000 on the house and grounds, and it seems likely that much of this was on the grounds (although the interiors of the house could also have been unfinished in 1778).  Burgoyne is known to have consulted Humphry Repton on landscaping in 1789-91 and a view of the house by Repton appeared in Peacock's Polite Repository for 1792. The building was enlarged in the 19th century and given swan-necked pediments over the windows on the main front. 


Mark Hall from the Ordnance Survey 6" map surveyed in 1873-74. The map shows clearly the courtyard of the Tudor house and the adjacent site of the Georgian mansion.

The smoking ruins of Mark Hall, 1947


The service wing of the house undergoing renovation in 1948.
After the Gilbeys left, Mark Hall became a land girls' hostel, but it was largely destroyed by fire in 1947. The east wing, which survived the fire, was later used as a temporary school until it was demolished in 1960. The 18th and 19th century stable block was converted into a veteran cycle museum by Harlow District Council in 1981 and part of the walled garden also survives. 

Descent: Edmund Shaa (who leased 1521 to Henry Parker, 10th Baron Morley); to brother, Thomas Shaa, who sold 1538 to Lord Morley (d. 1556); to Henry Parker (1531-77), 11th Baron Morley, who sold 1562 to James Altham (d. 1583); to son, Edward Altham (d. 1605); to son, Sir James Altham (d. 1610); to brother, Sir Edward Altham (d. 1632); to son, Sir James Altham (1614-); to brother, Leventhorpe Altham (1618-81); to son, James Altham (1662-97); to son, Peyton Altham (1695-1741); to son, James Altham (1723-44); to brother, Edward Altham (1731-57); to brother, Sir William Altham (1736-1818), who sold 1778 to his cousin, William Lushington (1748-1823), who sold 1786 to Montagu Burgoyne (1750-1836); who sold 1819 to Richard Arkwright, who gave it in 1820 to his son, Rev. Joseph Arkwright (d. 1864), vicar of Latton; to son, Loftus W. Arkwright (d. 1889) of Parndon Hall, who let it to relations; to son, Loftus J.W. Arkwright, who established Mark Hall Estate Co., which let it c.1893 to Newman Gilbey (d. 1942); used as Land Girls Hostel, 1943-47 when burnt down; estate sold 1947 to Harlow Development Corporation.


Oxhey Place, Hertfordshire


The Oxhey Place estate (originally called St. Cleeres or St. Clowes) was formed at the end of the 16th century when the Oxhey Hall estate was broken up and disemparked. It is likely but not certain that a new house was built then by Francis Heydon, but Sir James Altham certainly added the chapel of 1612 which is the only part of the estate to survive today. 


Oxhey Place: the chapel of 1612. Image: Diamond Geezer. Licenced under this Creative Commons licence

Oxhey was sold by the Althams in 1639 and from 1668-1866 was a property of the Bucknall and Estcourt families. Sir John Bucknall was responsible for rebuilding the house in 1688, reputedly at a cost of £3,000.


Oxhey Place as rebuilt in 1688.  Image: Hertfordshire Archives & Local Studies.

The only depiction of this building which I have found is a naive drawing in the Oldfield Collection in Hertfordshire Archives & Local Studies, which shows a house with an eleven-bay, three-storey front, a balustraded parapet, some elaborate shaped pediments over the ground and first-floor windows, and an improbable centrepiece, which may have incorporated some stonework from the previous house.  Some of the woodwork from old St. Cleeres was also used to make a new reredos in the chapel at about the same date.


Ordnance Survey 6" map surveyed 1872-74, showing the site before the erection of the Victorian house


A view of the Oxhey Place estate after the demolition of the house, painted by Francis Goodall and exhibited at the Royal Academy, as reproduced in the Illustrated London News.

The Bucknalls Oxhey Place was taken down in 1799, leaving only a farmhouse to bear the name through much of the 19th century, but in 1877 Thomas Blackwell, a partner in the famous pickle-making firm, Crosse & Blackwell, bought part of the estate and built a new house, which survived until c.1955-60, when it was burned down.  By then the grounds had become a London County Council housing estate and the house was in use as a medical centre.

Descent: Francis Heydon (fl. 1598); sold 1601 to Henry Fleetwood, who sold 1602 to Robert Bowyer and Richard Fusse; who sold 1604 to Sir James Altham (c.1555-1617), kt.; to son, Sir James Altham (d. 1624); to son, Sutton Altham (1622-30); to sisters, Elizabeth (1620-98), Countess of Anglesey and Frances (1621-50), Countess of Carbery, who sold 1639 to John Heydon; sold 1668 to Sir William Bucknall (d. 1676), kt. of London; to son, Sir John Bucknall (d. 1711), kt, who rebuilt the house in 1688; to son, William Bucknall (d. 1746); to son, John Askell Bucknall (d. 1796); to nephew, William Grimston (later Bucknall) (d. 1814), who demolished the house in 1799; to brother, Harbottle Grimston (later Bucknall) (d. 1823); to sister, Jane (d. 1829), wife of Thomas Estcourt of Estcourt Park (Glos); to son, Thomas Grimston Bucknall Estcourt; to son, Thomas Henry Sutton Sotheron Estcourt, who sold 1866 to Rt. Hon. William Henry Smith, who sold part of the estate for building and the rest in 1877 to Thomas Blackwell, who built a new house; to son, Thomas F. Blackwell; to son, Walter R. Blackwell (fl. 1908)...London County Council who developed the estate for housing; the house was intended to be preserved as a medical centre but burned down c.1955-60.


Timbercombe, Broomfield, Somerset


Timbercombe from the air.  Image: Bing Maps

A large Victorian villa in the Quantocks, lying between Spaxton, Aisholt and Broomfield and now in the latter parish, although formerly in Spaxton.  The house appears to have been substantially remodelled, if not completely rebuilt, in recent years.

Descent: Orlando Reeves (fl. 1853); sold by order of Chancery in 1853 to Lt-Col. James Chicheley Hyde (d. 1867); sold 1871 to William Surtees Altham (d. 1887); to widow, who sold to William T. White (d. 1910); to widow, Janey Catherine Anne White (d. 1935); sold 1936 to Henry Herbert Sweet-Escott (d. 1954); sold 1959 to John Samuel Byard White (b. 1936).



Altham family of Mark Hall and Timbercombe



Altham, Edward (d. 1571). Son of Christopher Altham of Girlington (Yorks WR) (fl. 1482). Sheriff of London, 1531. He married Audrey, daughter of Richard Hildersham of Stitchworth (Cambs) and had issue (probably among others):
(1) James Altham (d. 1583) (q.v.).
His was buried at Latton, 5 November 1571.

Altham, James (d. 1583/4) of Mark Hall.  Son and heir of Edward Altham (fl. 1531) and his wife Audrey, daughter of Richard Hildersham of Stitchworth (Cambs). Clothworker of London; Sheriff of London, 1557; High Sheriff of Essex, 1570. He married 1st, 29 January 1548, Elizabeth (d. 1558), daughter of Thomas Blanke of London and sister and heir to Sir Thomas Blanke, Lord Mayor of London, and 2nd, Mary (1517-1602), daughter of Thomas Mathews of Colchester (Essex) and widow of Thomas Langton and Sir Andrew Judd, Lord Mayor of London in 1550, and had issue five children including:
(1.1) Thomas Altham (d. c.1607), who was disinherited by his father for becoming a Roman Catholic; lived in Monmouth, Hereford and Abergavenny but owned house property in London; married [forename unknown] Bray or Gunter and had issue one son and three daughters, one of whom became a nun in Belgium; will proved 19 December 1607;
(1.2) Edward Altham (d. 1605) (q.v.);
(1.3) Sir James Altham (c.1555-1617), of Oxhey Place (Herts) (q.v.) [see below, Altham family of Oxhey Place]
He purchased Mark Hall, Latton (Essex) and the adjoining Priory estate in 1562 and entertained Queen Elizabeth there in 1571, 1576 and 1578.
He died 28 February 1583/4 and was buried in the chancel of Latton church, 1 March 1583/4, where he is commemorated by a monument. His will was proved 19 March 1583.

Altham, Edward (d. 1605) of Mark Hall.  Second son and heir of James Altham (d. 1583/4) of Mark Hall and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Blanke of London. He married 1st, 16 June 1558, Fortune Fowell, and 2nd, 5 February 1577, Elizabeth (d. 1621), daughter and co-heir of John Barne of Willesden (Middx) and granddaughter of Sir John Barne, kt., Lord Mayor of London in 1552, and had issue:
(1.1) Helen Altham (b. 1568), baptised 10 February 1568;
(1.2) Sir James Altham (1572-1610), kt. (q.v.); 
(1.3) Sir Edward Altham (d. 1632), kt. (q.v.);
(2.1) Mary Altham (1578-1647); married, c.1598, Ralph Hawtry of Ruislip (Middx) and had issue three sons and one daughter; buried at Ruislip, 4 April 1647, where there is a monument to her memory;
(2.2) Richard Altham (d. 1599); buried 30 May 1599;
(2.3) Capt. Emmanuel Altham (d. 1635); visited America, 1623 and Mauritius, 1628 (from whence he sent a live dodo to his brother, Edward); died in the East Indies, 1635; will proved November 1638.
He inherited Mark Hall from his father in 1583. After his death his estates passed in turn to his two sons.
He died 1 April 1605 and was buried at Latton (Essex), 8 April 1605; his will was proved 7 August 1605. His widow was buried 7 January 1621 with her husband; her will was proved 10 January 1622.

Altham, Sir James (1572-1610), kt., of Mark Hall. Son of Edward Altham (d. 1605) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Barne of Willesden (Middx), baptised 25 February 1572. Educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (admitted 1599) and Grays Inn (admitted 1600). Knighted, 9 January 1609/10. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Barrington, bt., and had issue:
(1) Joan Altham (b. 1610), baptised 27 March 1610; married Oliver St. John (c.1598-1673), the leading Parliamentarian, and had issue two sons and two daughters; died before 1638.
He inherited Mark Hall from his father in 1605. At his death without male issue, it passed to his brother, Sir Edward Altham.
He was buried at Latton, 15 July 1610. His widow married 2nd, 26 June 1611, Sir William Masham (1591-1656), 1st bt., and had further issue; she died before 18 March 1656.

Altham, Sir Edward (d. 1632), kt., of Mark Hall.  Second son of Edward Altham (d. 1605) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Barne of Willesden (Middx). Educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (admitted 1599) and Grays Inn (admitted 1604). Knighted by King James I at Royston (Herts), 21 May 1613. He married* 1st, 1 June 1608, Margaret (d. 1611), daughter of Thomas Nash, and 2nd, 31 March 1612, Joan (d. 1654), daughter of Sir John Leventhorpe, 1st bt. of Shingle Hall, Sawbridgeworth (Herts), and had issue:
(1.1) Jane Altham (1610-20), baptised 15 April 1610; died young, 20 February 1619/20;
(1.2) Margaret Altham (1611-25), baptised 25 August 1611; buried 28 August 1625;
(2.1) Joan Altham (1613-58), baptised 8 June 1613; married, 1632, Sir Thomas Smith (d. 1668), 1st bt., of Hill Hall (Essex) and had issue eleven sons and two daughters; died 14 July 1658;
(2.2) Sir James Altham (1614-76), knight (q.v.);
(2.3) Edward Altham (1615-16), baptised 18 June 1615; died in infancy and was buried, 26 March 1616;
(2.4) John Altham (1616-58), baptised 3 June 1616; educated at Bishops Stortford and Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (admitted 1633/34) and Grays Inn (admitted 1637; called to bar, 1648; ancient of the inn, 1658); died unmarried and was buried 7 December 1658; will proved 11 January 1659;
(2.5) Elizabeth Altham (d. 1646/7); buried 28 February 1646/7;
(2.6) Leventhorpe Altham (1618-81) (q.v.);
(2.7) Mary Altham (1619-44); married Sir William Halton, bt. of Little Sampford (Essex) and had issue; buried 30 September 1644**;
(2.8) Edward Altham (1622-94), baptised 13 October 1622; educated at St Catherine's College, Cambridge (admitted 1641; BA 1643/4); left to continue his studies overseas; undertook an unsuccessful mercantile journey to Constantinople, 1647; settled in Rome (Italy) in 1648 as a merchant (in partnership with Edward Brome or Brown), art agent and painter; received into the Roman Catholic church, 1652; he apparently lived an eremitic life at one time and there is a self-portrait of him as a hermit in the style of Salvator Rosa at Kingston Lacy (Dorset); died unmarried, 12 February 1694;
(2.9) Bridget Altham (d. c.1660); married 4 December 1650, Sir Peter Tyrell (d. 1711), 1st bt. of Hanslope (Bucks) but had no issue; living in 1658 but dead by 1664/5;
(2.10) Emmanuel Altham (b. 1625), baptised 25 April 1625; was unable to settle to a profession and sponged upon his mother and brothers; a member of the bodyguard for King Charles II in the weeks after his return from exile; living in 1663.
He inherited Mark Hall from his elder brother in 1610.
He died 28 May 1632 and was buried at Latton, 29 May 1632, where he is commemorated by a monument attributed to Thomas Stanton; his will was proved 29 November 1632. His first wife was buried 25 August 1611. His widow was buried at Latton, 25 September 1654.
*The baptism of an Emanuel, son of Edward Altham at Latton on 7 September 1600 may be evidence of a previous, unrecorded marriage, or conceivably of an illegitimate child.
**The date in the register; her monument says 29 December 1644.

Altham, Sir James (1614-76), KB, of Mark Hall.  Elder son of Sir Edward Altham (d. 1632), kt., and his second wife Joan, daughter of Sir John Leventhorpe, bt. of Shingle Hall, Sawbridgeworth (Herts), baptised 23 July 1614. Educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (admitted 1629/30; BA 1632/3). A Royalist during the Civil War and was fined £500 as a delinquent by Parliament; made a Knight of the Bath at the Coronation of King Charles II. He married, 1630, Alice (d. 1678), only daughter and heir of Sir John Spencer bt. of Offley Place (Herts), and had issue:
(1) Mary Altham (b. 1637), baptised 15 June 1637; married, 1655 (later sep.), Sir John Tufton (1623-85), 2nd bt., but died without issue.
He inherited Mark Hall from his father in 1632. At his death it passed to his brother.
He was buried 4 February 1675/6 and his will was proved at Chelmsford. His widow was buried 13 May 1678.

Altham, Leventhorpe (1618-81), of Mark Hall.  Younger son of Sir Edward Altham (d. 1632), kt., and his second wife Joan, daughter of Sir John Leventhorpe, bt. of Shingle Hall, Sawbridgeworth (Herts), born 9 June and baptised 30 June 1618.  Wine merchant in London. He married, March 1656, Joan (c.1634-91), daughter of David Edwards of Oswestry (Shropshire) and had issue:
(1) Edward Altham (b. 1658), baptised 9 October 1658;
(2) James Altham (1662-97) (q.v.);
(3) Theodosia Altham (b. 1665), baptised 7 August 1665; married, 14 July 1691, John Tilley;
(4) John Altham (b. 1666), baptised 18 July 1666.
He lived in London and at Hackney (Middx) until he inherited Mark Hall from his brother in 1675/6.
He died 24 August 1681 and was buried at Latton the following day. His widow died 15 October 1691.

Altham, James (1662-97), of Mark Hall.  Only son of Leventhorpe Altham (1618-81) of Mark Hall and his wife Joan, daughter of David Edwards of Oswestry (Shropshire), born 1662. He married, after 18 July 1687, Mary (d. 1731), daughter of Admiral John Tinker, and had issue:
(1) Mary Altham (1688-1752) (q.v.);
(2) Elizabeth Altham (b. c.1690), baptised 20 January 1690/1; married, 6 January 1712/3, Dr. Daniel Turner (1667-1741), surgeon and medical writer, and had issue;
(3) James Altham (b. 1692), baptised 24 November 1692; died young;
(4) Dorothy Altham (c.1694-1730), married, 24 November 1724, John Peyton, younger brother of Sir Yelverton Peyton, bt. of Grimston (Norfolk) and had issue; died 4 May 1730.
(5) Peyton Altham (1695-1741) (q.v.);
(6) Jane Altham, married, 28 July 1711, Richard Strutt of Bishops Stortford (Herts), attorney, and had issue;
(7) James Altham (b. c.1697); living in 1731.
He inherited Mark Hall from his father in 1681.
He died 28 December 1697. His widow lived in Cambridge died 2 February and was buried at Latton, 5 February 1731/2; her will was proved 7 February 1731/2.

Altham, Peyton (1695-1741), of Mark Hall. Eldest surviving son of James Altham (1662-97) of Mark Hall and his wife Mary, daughter of Admiral John Tinker, born 1695. Educated at St. John's College, Cambridge (admitted 1715). He married at East Harling (Norfolk), 29 October 1721, Mary (d. 1768), daughter of John Beard, Governor of Bengal, and had issue:
(1) Mary Altham (1722-38), baptised 12 September 1722; buried 15 March 1737/8;
(2) James Altham (1723-44), baptised 11 September 1723; died in the East Indies;
(3) Charlotte Altham (1725-63), baptised 30 April 1725; married, 2 February 1762, James Altham (b. 1710); buried 24 February 1763;
(4) Elizabeth Altham (b. 1726), baptised 1 May 1726; died unmarried;
(5) Harriott Altham (1727-73), baptised 7 October 1727; married, 7 August 1759, Rev. Stotherd Abdy (c. 1728-73), rector of Theydon Garnons (Essex) and Archdeacon of Essex [see Abdy of Albyns];
(6) Frances Altham (1728-49), baptised 19 October 1728; buried 20 June 1749;
(6) Edward Altham (b. & d. 1730), baptised 2 May 1730; died in infancy and was buried 6 September 1730;
(7) Edward Altham (1731-57), baptised 29 June 1731; died unmarried and was buried 3 January 1757; will proved 18 January 1757;
(8) Sir William Altham (1736-1818), kt. (q.v.);
He inherited Mark Hall from his father in 1697 and came of age in 1716. At his death he left his widow a life interest in the house, which she gave up to her son in 1755.
He died 2 November 1741 and was buried at Latton, 6 November 1741, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved 13 January 1741/2. His widow was buried 20 February 1768.

Altham, Sir William (1736-1818), of Mark Hall. Only son of Peyton Altham (1695-1741) of Mark Hall and his wife Mary, daughter of John Beard, Governor of Bengal, baptised 5 June 1736. Educated at Hitchin and Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1754). Knighted by King George III, 13 September 1786. Mayor of Thetford, 1793. In old age he suffered from asthma and found relief in a proprietary medicine called Stramonium, which he publicly endorsed. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Mark Hall from his elder brother in 1757, and he altered the old house before 1771. He sold the estate to William Lushington in 1778, and lived subsequently at The White House, Thetford (Norfolk) until 1802, when he is reported to have moved to Bath.
He died at Kensington House, 7 August and was buried at Latton, 14 August 1818.

Altham, Mary (1688-1752) Elder daughter of James Altham (1662-97) of Mark Hall and his wife Mary, daughter of Admiral John Tinker, baptised 19 September 1688. She married, after 31 May 1705, her kinsman, the Ven. Roger Altham DD (1658-1730), vicar of Latton, 1705-30, prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral, 1695-1730 and Archdeacon of Middlesex, 1717-30, and had issue:
(1) Roger Altham (b. 1706), baptised 31 May 1706; died young;
(2) Mary Altham (later Lushington) (c.1707-75) (q.v.);
(3) Jane Altham (b. 1708/9), baptised 28 March 1709;
(4) James Altham (b. 1710), baptised 25 July 1710; married 1st, 8 September 1730, Mary Hanway (d. 1736) and had issue, and 2nd, 2 February 1762, Charlotte (1725-63), daughter of Peyton Altham of Mark Hall;
(5) Elizabeth Altham (b. 1712), baptised 21 April 1712; living in 1731; probably the person of this name who married, after 23 April 1736, John Cumberlege;
(6) John Altham (b. 1714); baptised 4 November 1714; possibly the person of this name who married, 27 August 1738, Martha Wilton;
(7) Roger Altham (1718-88) (q.v.).
(8) Dorothy Altham (b. 1721), baptised 19 October 1721; living in 1731.
She died in November 1752. Her husband died in February 1729/30 and was buried at Latton, 3 March 1729/30, where there is an inscription to his memory.


Mary Lushington
by J.H. Mortimer, 1774
Lushington (née Altham), Mary (c.1707-75).  Daughter of Ven. Roger Altham DD (1658-1730) and his wife Mary, elder daughter of James Altham of Mark Hall.  She married, 10 May 1737, Rev. Henry Lushington (1709-79), vicar of Eastbourne (Sussex), and had issue:
(1) Henry Lushington (1738-63), born 10 August and baptised 9 September 1738; on the staff of Maj-Gen. Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive (Clive of India); survived the Black Hole of Calcutta but was murdered in India in 1763;
(2) Charlotte Lushington (1739-c.1820), born 11 December 1739 and baptised 15 January 1739/40; married, 20 November 1762, Ralph Leycester (1737-1822) of Toft and had issue four sons and three daughters; died between 1817 and 1821;
(3) Jane Lushington (1739-), born 11 December 1739 and baptised 15 January 1739/40; married Rev. Thomas Altham LLD (d. 1782), son of Rev. James Altham of Woodford (Essex), and had issue one son and one daughter;
(4) Matthew Altham Lushington (1740-54), born 12 November and baptised 12 December 1740; educated at Charterhouse, but died there and was buried 26 December 1754;
(5) Maria Lushington (1742-1806). born 29 March and baptised 10 May 1742; married, 19 November 1767, John Tilson (d. 1774) of Watlington Park (Oxon) and had issue; will proved 17 February 1806;
(6) Sir Stephen Lushington (1744-1807), 1st bt., of South Hill Park (Berks), born 17 June 1744; Director of the East India Company (Chairman, 1790-91, 1795-6, 1799-1800), 1782-1805; MP for Hedon 1783-84, Helston 1790-96, Mitchell 1796-1802, Penrhyn 1802-06 and Plympton Erle 1806-07; created a baronet, 26 April 1791; married 6th June 1771, Hester (d. 1830), daughter of John Boldero of Aspenden Hall (Herts) and had issue three sons; died 12 January 1807 [see a future post on the Lushington family of South Hill Park];
(7) William Lushington (1748-1823) of Mark Hall; served with HEIC Bengal Service to 1773; MP for the City of London; purchased Mark Hall from his cousin, Sir William Altham, in 1778 and sold it to Montagu Burgoyne in 1786; married, 28 March 1769 in India, Paulina, daughter of Thomas French and had issue two sons and two daughters; died 1823;
(8) Catherine Lushington; died in infancy.
She died in 1775. Her husband married 2nd, Mary Gilbert, and died in 1799.

Altham, Roger (1718-88). Son of Ven. Roger Altham DD (1658-1730) and his wife Mary, elder daughter of James Altham of Mark Hall, baptised 25 September 1718. Proctor in Doctor's Commons; called to the bar in Inner Temple, 1754; Seal Keeper of the High Court of Admiralty; Registrar of the Archdeaconry of Middlesex and of the Dean & Chapter of Westminster. He married, 4 November 1746, Mary (d. 1781), daughter and co-heir of Robert Isaacson of Fenton (Northbld) and had issue: 
(1) Frances Altham (1749-1819), baptised 28 April 1749; married, 26 December 1777, James Heseltine (1745-1804) and had issue one son and one daughter; buried at Islington (Middx), 30 June 1819;
(2) Arabella Altham (1755-1827), baptised 14 May 1755; married 12 June 1780, John Graham Clarke of Kenton Lodge (Northbld) and had issue (including Mary Graham Clarke 1781-1828, the mother of Elizabeth Barrett Browning); died 10 November 1827;
(3) Mary Altham (1759-1810) (q.v.); 
(4) Jane Altham (1763-95), baptised 13 September 1762; married, 1783, Nathaniel Bishop (1760-1836) and had issue; died 25 May and was buried at Islington (Middx), 1 June 1795;
(5) Charlotte Altham; married, 25 September 1794, Thomas Lewis and had issue a son.
He inherited a moiety of the Fenton House estate in Northumberland in right of his wife, and at his death it was divided equally among his five daughters. In 1859 their descendants joined together to sell the whole moiety to the Earl of Durham, who also bought the other moiety, and whose descendants still own the estate.
He died 11 October 1788; his will was proved 29 October 1788. His wife died 3/8 March 1781.

Surtees (née Altham), Mary (1759-1810). Second daughter of Roger Altham (1718-88) of Fenton House (Northbld) and his wife Mary, daughter of Robert Isaacson of Fenton House, born 29 May 1759.  She married, 4 December 1781, Aubone Surtees (1752-1827) of Hauxley Hall (Northbld), second son of Aubone Surtees (1711-1800) of Newcastle, banker, and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Surtees (1783-1862) (q.v.)
She inherited one fifth of a moiety of the Fenton House estate from her father in 1788, but it was sold by the trustees of her marriage settlement in 1829.
She died 23 July 1810. Her husband died in 1827.

Cook (née Surtees), Elizabeth (1783-1862).  Only daughter of Aubone Surtees (1752-1827) and his wife Mary, daughter of Roger Altham of Fenton House (Northbld), born 18 July 1783. She married, 8 October 1808, Col. John Cook (1772-1829) of 28th Light Dragoons, Inspector of Yeomanry Cavalry and author of Observations on Fox-Hunting, and had issue (with other children who did not survive infancy):
(1) Rev. John Aubone Cook (1811-59), born 29 November 1811 at Pilgrim's Hatch, Brentwood (Essex); educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (admitted 1834; BA 1839; MA 1847); ordained deacon, 1838 and priest, 1839; curate of St Margaret, Westminster, 1844-50; vicar of South Benfleet (Essex) 1850-59 and Rural Dean of Canewdon; noted for his selfless care of his parishioners during a cholera outbreak in 1854; died unmarried, 29 September 1859; grant of adminstration 18 November 1859 (estate under £300);
(2) Elizabeth Sarah Cook (c.1811-87); died unmarried, 29 April 1887; will proved 6 June 1887 (estate £2,008);
(3) William Surtees Altham Cook (later Altham) (1813-87) (q.v.);
(4) Mary Susannah Altham Cook (d. 1883); died unmarried, 12 December 1883; will proved 15 January 1884 (estate £1,627);
(5) Susan Cook (b. c.1824), born in France; married, 1855, Thomas Brace Stone (d. 1855); died without issue after 1861.
The family lived in France when the children were growing up.
She died 1 September 1862; her will was proved 18 September 1862 (estate under £600). Her husband died 3 December 1829.

Altham (né Cook), Maj. William Surtees (1813-87), of Timbercombe. Second son of Col. John Cook and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Aubone Surtees, born 24 March 1813. Major in 83rd Foot. JP for Somerset. He assumed the name and arms of Altham by royal licence, 20 February 1862. He married 1st, 6 April 1850, his cousin Henrietta (1809-60), daughter of Edward Barrett Moulton-Barrett of Hope End (Herefs), and 2nd, 20 February 1862, his cousin Arabella (1820-1908), daughter of Jesse Addams QC, DCL, and had issue:
(1.1) Rev. Altham Surtees Altham (1851-1931) (q.v.);
(1.2) Mary Altham Altham (1853-1951); died unmarried aged 98, 7 June 1951; will proved 18 July 1951 (estate £250);
(1.3) Lt-Gen. Sir Edward Altham Altham (1856-1943) (q.v.);
(2.1) Charlotte Altham (1864-1934); married, 1889, Rev. Alexander Lamont Stewart (d. 1904), rector of Aisholt (Somerset), and had issue a daughter; died 20 October 1934; will proved 11 December 1934 (estate £1,637).
He purchased the Timbercombe estate in Somerset in 1871; at his death it passed to his wife, who sold it to William T. White.
He died 14 February 1887; his will was proved 14 May 1887 (estate £832). His widow died 7 February 1908; her will was proved 4 April 1908 (estate £7,856)

Altham, Rev. Altham Surtees (1851-1931). Elder son of Maj. William Surtees Cooke (later Altham) of Timbercombe, and his first wife, Henrietta, daughter of Edward Barrett Moulton-Barrett of Hope End (Herefs), born 23 January and baptised 5 February 1851. Educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1869; BA 1872; MA 1876); ordained deacon, 1874 and priest, 1875; curate in Taunton, 1874-87; vicar of Holy Trinity, Taunton, 1887-90 and All Saints, Wellingborough (Northants), 1891-1903; rector of Lapford (Devon), 1903-27. He married, 26 April 1881, Bertha Emma, daughter of Rev. Francis Fisher, vicar of Hilmarton (Wilts), and had issue:
(1) Henrietta Fanny Altham (b. 1882), born 7 November 1882; died unmarried, 23 January 1957 and was buried at Lapford (Devon); will proved 8 March 1957 (estate £8,629);
(2) John Altham Surtees Altham (1886-1950); motor engineer; married, 1916, Violet May Wise and had issue a daughter; died 31 January 1950; administration of goods granted 23 June 1950 (estate £9,035).
He died 1 October 1931. His will was proved 10 December 1931 (estate £1,161).

Altham, Lt-Gen. Sir Edward Altham (1856-1943). Second son of Maj. William Surtees Cooke (later Altham) and his first wife, Henrietta, daughter of Edward Barrett Moulton-Barrett of Hope End (Herefs), born 13 April 1856. Educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1874).  Joined Royal Scots Regiment, 1876; Bechunaland expedition 1884-1885; Staff College 1888-1889; Intelligence Div, War Office 1897-1899; Assistant Adjutant General, Intelligence, South Africa 1899-1900; Staff College 1900; Intelligence Div 1900-1904; General Staff, South Africa 1906-1908; in charge of Administration, Northern Command 1908-1910; Southern Command 1911-1915; World War I 1914-1918; Inspector General of Communications, Dardanelles 1915; Inspector General of Communications, Egyptian Expeditionary Force 1916; Quartermaster General, India 1917-1919; retired 1920; Col. of Royal Scots Greys, 1918-35; author of The principles of war, historically illustrated, 1914; appointed CMG, 1901; CB 1904; KCB 1916; KCIE 1919. He married, 5 November 1880, Georgina Emily (1855-1945), daughter of William Macpherson Nichol of Inverness and had issue:
(1) Capt. Edward Altham (1882-1950), born 7 January and baptised 17 February 1882; educated at Royal Naval College, Greenwich and HMS Britannia; served in Royal Navy 1896-1922 (Lt, 1902; Cmdr, 1913; Captain, 1919; ret. 1922); Secretary of Royal United Services Institute; Chief of Naval Postal & Telegraph Censorship, 1939-44; naval editor of Encyclopaedia Britannica; appointed CB 1919; married 1st, 23 May 1908 (div.), Fiorella Cecil, daughter of Reginald C.B. Willis of Ealing (Middx) and had issue one son and one daughter, and 2nd, 14 August 1922, Joyce Ellinor Mylius, daughter of Louis Henry Mylius Dick; lived in London; died 16 October 1950; will proved 29 December 1950 (estate £5,232);
(2) Dorothy Mary Altham (1883-1969), born 26 December 1883 and baptised 23 January 1884; died unmarried, 31 March 1969;
(3) Harry Surtees Altham (1888-1965), born 30 November 1888 and baptised 10 January 1989; educated at Repton and Trinity College, Oxford; schoolmaster at Winchester College, 1913-15, 1919-49; served with 69th Rifles in WW1, 1915-19; appointed MC and DSO, 1918; CBE 1957; Treasurer of MCC, 1950-63 and President, 1959-60; Chairman of MCC Youth Cricket Association, 1952-65; author of A history of cricket, 1926; Hampshire County Cricket, 1957 and editor of The MCC Cricket Coaching Book, 1952; married, 27 June 1917, (Winifred) Alison, daughter of Somerville Read Livingstone-Learmonth, a sheep farmer in Australia, and had issue one son and two daughters; lived at Kingsmead, Winchester; died 11 March 1965; will proved 19 May 1965 (estate £7,389).
In retirement he lived at 7 Kingsgate Street, Winchester (Hants).
He died 27 September 1943; his will was proved 8 December 1943 (estate £8,085). His widow died 27 September 1945


Altham family of Oxhey Place



Altham, Sir James (c.1555-1617), of Oxhey Place.  Youngest son of James Altham (d. 1583) of Mark Hall (Essex) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Blanke of London. Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1571) and Grays Inn (admitted 1575; called to bar, 1581; ancient of the inn, 1595; bencher, 1599; reader, 1601); barrister-at-law; 
MP for Bramber, 1589; serjeant-at-law, 1603; knighted 15 February 1606/7; Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, 1607-17. A Puritan in religion. He married 1st, 1584, Margaret (d. 1597), daughter and heir of Oliver Skinner, 2nd, Mary, daughter of Hugh Staines of London and widow of [forename unknown] Grimes, and 3rd, Ellen or Helen (d. 1638), the widow of John Hyde of London, and had issue (probably among others):
(1.1) Sir James Altham (fl. 1621) of Oxhey Place (q.v.);
(2.1) Richard Altham (d. 1623); educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1614/5) and Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1615); died without issue, 1623;
(2.2) Mary Altham; married Sir Francis Stidolph of Mickleham (Surrey);
(2.3) Elizabeth Altham (d. 1662/3); married 1st, Sir Francis Astley (d. 1638), kt. of Hillmorton (Warks), 2nd, Robert Digby (d. 1642), 1st Baron Digby of Geashill, and 3rd, Sir Robert Bernard (1601-66), 1st bt.; died 3 January 1662/3;
(2.4) Susan Altham.
He acquired the Oxhey Place (Herts) estate in 1604.
He died at Serjeant's Inn, 21 February 1617, and was buried at Oxhey, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved 10 March 1617. His widow died in 1638; her will was proved 11 May 1638.

Altham, Sir James (d. 1624), of Oxhey Place. Son of Sir James Altham (fl. late 16th cent.) of Oxhey Place and his wife Margaret, daughter of Oliver Skinner. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1600) and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (admitted 1603). Knighted, 1608. He married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Richard Sutton, kt. of London, one of the auditors to King James I, and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Altham (1620-98); married, 24 April 1638, Arthur Annesley (1614-86), 2nd Viscount Valentia and later 1st Earl of Anglesey, and had issue; buried 26 January 1697/8;
(2) Frances Altham (1621-50); married, 8 August 1637, Lt-Gen. Richard Vaughan (d. 1687), 2nd Earl of Carbery and had issue three sons and one daughter;
(3) Sutton Altham (1622-30), baptised 28 August 1622; died young in 1630.
He inherited Oxhey Place from his father in 1606.
He died 15 February 1623/4. His widow married 2nd, Sir John Ashfield of Netherhall. 


Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1898, i, p.19; Anon, 'Some Althams of Mark Hall in the seventeenth century', The Essex Review, 1908, pp. 74-87, 134-46; Burke's Landed Gentry, 1972, iii, p.17; J. Kenworthy-Browne et al, Burke's & Savill's Guide to Country Houses:  vol 3, East Anglia, 1981, p. 62; Carter, Goode & Laurie, Humphry Repton, 1982, p. 151; J. Montagu, 'Edward Altham as a hermit', in E. Chaney & P. Mack, England and the Continental Renaissance, 1990; J. Bettley & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Essex, 2nd edn, 2007, pp. 455-56;  http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/AndrewJudde.htm.


Location of archives


Altham family of Mark Hall: deeds and an estate map, 17th-18th cents. [Essex Record Office, D/DAr]; correspondence, 1618-1716 [Cambridge University Library, MS Add. 9270]
Altham, Sir James (d. 1610), MP and judge: misc. correspondence and papers, 16th-17th cent. [Inner Temple Library; British Library Add. MSS. 12497, 40746; Harleian MS. 1546; Lansdowne MS. 87]
Altham (né Cook), William Surtees (1813-87): diaries, 1847-87 [Baylor University, Waco, Texas: Armstrong-Browning Collection]


Coat of arms


Quarterly: 1st and 4th, paly of six, ermine and azure on a chief perpales or and gules, a lion, passant guardant counterchanged, a bordure engrailed of the last; 2nd and 3rd, azure, on a chevron argent, between three garbs or, as many fleurs-de-lis gules.

Revised
This account was last revised, 20th April 2014.