Tuesday, 10 April 2018

(327) Bainbrigge of Lockington Hall and Woodseat Hall

Bainbrigge of Lockington
& Woodseat
This family are said to have been of great antiquity in the north of England, but first came to the manor of Lockington in north Leicestershire in the 1540s. They were probably yeoman tenants at that time, but William Bainbrigge (c.1535-1614), who was married at Lockington in 1562, purchased the manor in 1576 and in 1583 obtained the grant of a crest in addition to his ancient arms. The family name was spelled in an uncommon variety of ways: the most usual was 'Bainbrigge' and this has been used consistently in this account, but other forms, including Bainbridge, Baynbrigg, Banbridge, Benbrigg and even Bembridge have been found in the records.

William Bainbrigge's large family was recorded on the tomb he built for himself and his wife in Lockington church in 1614. His eldest son, John Bainbrigge (1573-1643) inherited the estate in 1617, having apparently lived elsewhere in his father's lifetime, perhaps on one of the other properties - at Kegworth and Long Clawson (Leics), and Sutton Bonington and Little Leake (Notts) - which the family acquired during the 16th and 17th centuries. He apparently had only one son and one daughter who survived to maturity. The son was William Bainbrigge (1605-69), who served as High Sheriff of Leicestershire in 1648-49 and whose third wife was the sister of General Henry Ireton. On these grounds, it may be presumed that he was sympathetic to the Parliamentarian regime, but neither he nor his father can be discerned as taking any active part in the Civil War. William produced a total of nine children by his second and third wives; but his eldest son, John Bainbrigge (1628-59), died in his father's lifetime, and it was therefore John's only surviving son, John Bainbrigge (1658-1717), who inherited the Lockington estate in 1669. All of William's sons who survived to maturity were apparently provided with landed property, and several of them either married into or bought additional land. In this way William Bainbrigge (c.1644-79) laid the foundations for the cadet branch of the family which became established at Woodseat in Rocester (Staffs) in the 18th century.

John Bainbrigge (1658-1717) inherited Lockington as a child of eleven, and his long minority may have allowed some capital to be accumulated by his trustees. He came of age in 1679, in 1683 married an heiress who brought him the Harley estate at Osgathorpe, and in about 1688 embarked on the building of a new house at Lockington, which forms the core of the present building. An 18th century engraving shows that as first built, the house was an elegant example of the typical late 17th century house, with a hipped roof and tall cupola, like a miniature Belton Hall. John was succeeded by his elder son, William Bainbrigge (1686-1736), who like his father married well. His wife was Mary, the only surviving daughter of Philip Lacock (or Laycock) of Woodborough Hall (Notts). When Philip died in 1721, he left his estate to Mary and to the children of her deceased sister. William and Mary seem to have bought out the interest of her nieces and, when William died fairly young, Mary returned to Woodborough and lived out the rest of her long life there. William was succeeded at Lockington by his eldest son, John Bainbrigge (1718-36), but he died only a few weeks after his father, and the estate passed to his next brother, Philip Harley Bainbrigge (1719-69), who is said to have devoted himself to rural pursuits and cut no figure in the world. He married, in 1746, but had no children, so on his death the estate passed to his spinster sisters Mary (1714-79) and Elizabeth (1716-97), who lived at Woodborough with their mother. Elizabeth in particular was noted for her charitable works on and around her estates, and was given fulsome tributes in published works which strongly convey the reverence felt for her generosity. She was, however, the last of the Lockington Bainbrigges, and bequeathed her estates to a maternal cousin, the Rev. Philip Story (c.1747-1819), whose descendants sold them in the 19th century. It is notable that she chose to benefit her maternal kin in this way rather than leaving the estate to her heir-at-law, Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818) of Woodseat: she perhaps disapproved of his morals and way of life (see below).

William Bainbrigge (c.1644-79), the third son of William Bainbrigge (1605-69) of Lockington, was left his father's manor of Over Hall, Lockington, and estates at Kegworth and Long Clawson (Notts), and Sutton Bonington and Little Leake (Notts). His marriage in 1665 to Barbara Wilmot of Osmaston (Derbys) may have turned his attention further west, for in 1674 he bought an estate at Rocester (Staffs), which he left to his youngest son, Thomas Bainbrigge (1678-1746). His Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire property passed to his eldest son, William Bainbrigge (1667-1706), whose son and heir, Edward Brett Bainbrigge (1704-41) died unmarried. He bequeathed the estate back to the main line of his family, in the person of  his kinsman, Philip Harley Bainbrigge (1719-69) of Lockington.

Thomas Bainbrigge (1678-1746) inherited his father's Rocester property, but there was no house on the estate and so when he came of age he lived in Derby, where there was a substantial community of polite families at this period. It was his son, also Thomas Bainbrigge (1717-98), who served as High Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1760, who finally built a house on the Rocester property, which he named Woodseat Hall. It was a handsome and compact five bay three storey house, completed in 1776, similar to many of the villas built by pottery owners in the area around Stoke-on-Trent. In 1778 he expanded his property there by buying the manor of Rocester.  Thomas had four sons, the eldest of whom, Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818) was one of the more remarkable characters to feature in this blog. His father's unwillingness to agree the terms of his marriage settlement cause him to become depressed and retreat from the world. He eventually so far departed from the established canons of polite behaviour, manners and dress that he was unable to retain the services of servants for long, and that people followed him in the streets, pointing out 'mad Bainbrigge'. A quarter of a century after he died, his eccentricities were vivid in the mind of witnesses in a series of legal cases about his will, which were reported verbatim in the press. He was unmarried, but in 1790 produced an illegitimate daughter, Betsy, who was the apple of his eye until she disgraced herself with his coachman and produced an illegitimate daughter herself. A few years later, she married William Arnold, the son of his least favourite tenant farmer and was forbidden the house, but by this time, Thomas had taken a shine to her illegitimate daughter, Mary Anne (1809-38), whom he brought up in his increasingly chaotic and dissolute household, reportedly delighting in her precocious ability to swear at the servants.

Thomas Bainbrigge died in 1818, and by his will left his property to Mary Anne, with remainder to her legitimate issue, and after them to the sons of his illegitimate daughter Betsy. This will was signed only two days before his death, and superseded a will of 1815 which made similar provision for Mary Anne and her children, but after them left the estate in remainder to his legitimate nephews, the sons of his brothers. Mary Anne married in 1825 and died in 1838, leaving a son and a daughter, but they died while still minors in 1843 and 1845. The extinction of Mary Anne's heirs signalled the start of a legal battle royal between William Arnold (later Bainbrigge) (1813-79), Betsy's eldest son, and Thomas Parker Bainbrigge (1791-1870), the eldest legitimate nephew. The point at issue was whether the Arnolds had colluded with Thomas Bainbrigge's solicitor to secure Thomas' signature on the will of 1818 either by fraud or by undue influence, and if so, whether the last valid will was that of 1815, under which Thomas Parker Bainbrigge would inherit. A jury decided in 1846 (possibly against the evidence and certainly against the tenor of the judge's summing up) that they had, and found for Thomas Parker Bainbrigge. Civil cases followed, and eventually in 1851 a compromise was reached by which Thomas Parker Bainbrigge secured the estate in return for a payment of £25,000 to the Arnold heirs, about a third of the value of the property. There was, however, a further decade of legal wrangling before T.P. Bainbrigge had a sufficiently secure title to sell the estate and pay off his legal debts. Indeed, only the lawyers seem ultimately to have benefited: Thomas Parker Bainbrigge left an estate worth less than £3,000 and his adversary William Arnold Bainbrigge left a paltry £113 when he was run over by a cart in Shoreditch in 1879.

The story of the family as landed gentry ends with Thomas Parker Bainbrigge's sale of the estate in 1862, but the genealogy below also gives an account of the career of Lt-Col. Philip Bainbrigge (1756-99), the youngest of the four sons of Thomas Bainbrigge (1717-98), and his descendants down to the mid 20th century. Over four generations they are a notable example of a solid upper middle class family with a strong tradition of service in the military, the church, and colonial administration.


Lockington Hall, Leicestershire


Lockington Hall: the house as first built in c.1688, recorded in an engraving of 1797.


Nothing seems to be known of the manor house acquired or built by William Bainbrigge when he bought the manor in 1576, which was occupied by his descendants for a hundred years. John Bainbrigge (1658-1717), who inherited as a minor and came of age in 1679 was responsible for building a new manor house, which still stands, albeit much altered by later generations. The new house was a seven by five bay two-storey stone block, built in about 1688, with a hipped roof, dormers, and a central cupola. The ends of the seven bay front were brought forward and emphasised with stone quoins, and there was a pedimented entrance bay. It was thus a classic late 17th century house, resembling a smaller edition of Belton House (Lincs). The architect is unrecorded. The only fragment of the original interior decoration to survive is the upper part of the original staircase, above first floor level in the centre of the south side, which is a dog-leg stair with balusters of complicated outline and knob finials.

Lockington Hall: the house as remodelled between 1797 and 1804, with the later service wings in the background.  Image: Historic England.
William Bainbrigge (1686-1736), was succeeded at Lockington in turn by his sons John (1718-36) and Philip Harley Bainbrigge (1719-69). When the latter died without issue, the property passed to his unmarried sisters, Mary and Elizabeth, who lived at Woodborough Hall. When Elizabeth died, her estates were left to a maternal cousin, the Rev. Philip Story (c.1747-1819), who had been rector of Lockington since 1777 and perhaps occupying the hall. He promptly undertoook a major remodelling of the house.  His changes, which had been completed by 1804, involved adding the attic storey, stuccoing the house, and giving it sashes with moulded surrounds and a Tuscan colonnade between the wings. A second pedimented doorway was also added to the north side, and the interiors were almost completely redecorated. The main rooms are those on the ground and first floors in the centre of the east front; the upper one has an Adam-style plaster ceiling and lower one a good Classical chimneypiece. Once again, the architect is unknown.

When the Rev. Philip Story died in 1819, Lockington passed to his son, John Bainbrigge Story (1779-1827), who was killed by the fall of a ship's mast while travelling between Geneva and Lucerne. He was succeeded by his son and namesake (1813-72), but after he died the property was sold to Nathaniel Charles Curzon (1829-97). He made further alterations, including the addition of two square bay windows on the south side and the porte-cochere on the north front, and most importantly added two large brick service wings at the rear, which doubled the size of the house. Inside, the west half of the centre of the house was made into a large staircase hall, with a weak 18th-century style staircase. The house continued to be occupied by the family until the death of John Curzon in 1972, after which it was leased to the Architects Design Partnership, who converted it to offices. Subsequently, the former Coach House was converted into offices and new office buildings have been erected within the former kitchen garden. 


Descent: William Bainbrigge (c.1535-1617); to son, John Bainbrigge (1573-1643); to son, William Bainbrigge (1605-69); to grandson, John Bainbrigge (1658-1717); to son, William Bainbrigge (1686-1736); to son, John Bainbrigge (1718-36); to brother, Philip Harley Bainbrigge (1719-69); to sisters Mary Bainbrigge (1714-79) and Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1716-97); to cousin, Rev. Philip Story (c.1747-1819); to son, John Bainbrigge Story (1779-1827); to son, Maj. John Bainbrigge Story (1813-72), who sold 1872 to Nathaniel Charles Curzon (1829-97); to brother, William Curzon (1836-1916); to nephew, Francis Curzon Newton (later Curzon) (1861-1918); to son, John Curzon (1913-72); to nephew, Charles Coaker (b. 1951), who converted it for use as offices, 1973.


Woodborough Hall, Nottinghamshire


The house began as a two-storey brick house built for Philip Lacock, a Nottingham solicitor who was Clerk of the Peace for the county, in about 1660. The original external appearance is not known, but quite a lot survives inside, including a very fine dog-leg staircase with carved scroll balusters, square newel posts with carved swags, vases and pendant drops, and a matching dado rail has similar balusters, newels and vases. In the entrance hall there is a contemporary fireplace with a surround incorporating fluted Doric pilasters, and several other rooms have fireplaces which may be of the same period.


Woodborough Hall: the 17th century staircase.

The house was extensively remodelled and given an extra storey by T.C. Hine of Nottingham for Mansfield Parkyns in the 1850s. He was responsible for the present mullioned and transomed casement windows with Gothic lights, and for the addition of a single-storey service wing at the rear, as well as for much of the interior detail. The house remained in private occupation until 1937 when it was bought by the Crown as a house to be used by the regional commanding officer of the RAF. It was transferred to the Army to perform a similar function in 1959, and a number of changes were made to the house before 1966, including moving the main entrance from the end elevation to the centre of the garden front.


Woodborough Hall: the main front as remodelled in the 1850s, with a new doorway from the 1960s and the 1980s east wing.

The house ceased to be used by army commanding officers in 1980 and stood empty for four years, in which time its condition deteriorated. After 1984, a new private owner made the top floor into flats and demolished a 19th century east wing, but in 1988 it was restored and converted into a nursing home, for which a long single-storey replacement east wing was built. The house has since become a hotel and wedding venue, which was for sale at the time of writing.

Descent: sold to George Laycock; to son, Philip Lacock (d. 1668); to son, Charles Lacock (d. 1683); to son, Philip Lacock (d. 1721); to daughter, Mary (1693-1785), wife of William Bainbrigge (1686-1736); to daughter, Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1716-97); to cousin, Rev. Philip Story (c.1747-1819); to son, John Bainbridge Story (1779-1827); to son, Maj. John Bainbridge Story (1813-72) who sold 1842 to John Ingall Werg; sold 1852 to Mansfield Parkyns (d. 1894); sold by his executors in 1895 to Charles Hose Hill, who sold 1923 to Hubert Dowson; sold 1937 to Crown for use of local commanding officers of the Royal Air Force and (from 1959) of the Army; sold 1984 to Mr Oxby; sold 1988 to Dennis Wright and Gerald Poxton, who restored the house as a nursing home; adapted after 2004 for use as a hotel and wedding venue.


Woodseat Hall, Rocester, Staffordshire


A five bay, two-and-a-half storey house, said to have been built in 1767 for Thomas Bainbrigge (1714-98) to the designs of an unknown architect. The house was perhaps originally very plain, with the only decoration a pedimented three-bay breakfront, a double plat band between the ground and first floors, and a central pedimental doorcase. The house was the subject of legal wrangling between the heirs of Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818) for some thirty years in the mid 19th century, and much of the value of the estate was consumed by the legal fees accrued by the contending parties. 


Woodseat Hall: the house after the additions of 1862-63. 

The house may have become rather neglected by 1860, when the legal case was finally settled and the house could be sold. The new owner, Colin Minton Campbell, certainly embarked at once on a radical remodelling of the house after taking possession. He engaged T.C. Hine of Nottingham to add the tall two-storey wings either side of the 18th century block, with their elaborate tripartite windows on the ground and first floors, and to have enhanced the decoration of the centre, with triangular pediments over the windows of the ground and first floors and the addition of urns to the pediment. It is not known whether the interior of the old house was also remodelled, although it seems likely as the addition of the new wings, with their large high-ceilinged rooms, must inevitably have changed the functions of the rooms in the older part of the house.


Woodseat Hall: the ruins before the start of work to construct a new golf club house. Image: Dave Whieldon (Flickr)

The Campbell family sold Woodseat in 1941, and the house seems to have been unoccupied thereafter. It was in ruins by the 1970s, when the land around it was used as a market garden, and by the 1980s the whole of the 18th century centre had collapsed, leaving only the two 19th century wings. The site was acquired in 1986 by the highly successful manufacturers of earth-moving machinery, JCB plc, whose international headquarters was built in the 1980s a little to the north. In 2014 they obtained planning permission to lay out the grounds as a golf course, and to incorporate the surviving ruins of the old house in the club house. Unfortunately, rather than reconstructing the original elevation of the house (a solution for which there was ample photographic evidence) they chose to pursue a Modernist scheme that inserts a glass box between the two wings. It is not clear how far construction of the new building has proceeded at the time of writing.

Descent: Thomas Bainbrigge (1714-98); to son, Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818); to his natural granddaughter, Mary Anne Bainbrigge (1809-38); to trustees for her children (d. 1843 and 1845); to Thomas Parker Bainbrigge (1791-1870); sold by order of Chancery in 1861 to Colin Minton Campbell MP (1827-85); to son, John Fitzherbert Campbell (1861-1918); to son, Colin Herbert Campbell (1887-1955); sold 1941...sold c.1974 to Mr A. Nash; sold 1986 to JCB plc.


Bainbrigge family of Lockington Hall



Bainbrigge, William (c.1535-1617). Son and heir of Robert Bainbrigge (d. 1572) of Lockington and his wife Isabella, daughter of William Milgate of Manchester, born about 1535. He married 1st, 24 November 1562 at Lockington, Modwyn Wolfhide and 2nd, 17 April 1571 at Lockington, Elizabeth (d. 1624), daughter of Edward Charde esq. of London, and had issue including:
(2.1) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1572-82), baptised at Lockington, 28 September 1572; died young and was buried at Lockington, 3 September 1582;
(2.2) John Bainbrigge (1573-1643) (q.v.);
(2.3) Mary Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1575), baptised at Lockington, 30 October 1575; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 3 November 1575;
(2.4) Barnaby Bainbrigge (1576-1613), baptised at Lockington, 30 October 1576; merchant venturer; died unmarried and was buried at King's Lynn (Norfk), 20 August 1613;
(2.5) Mary Bainbrigge (b. 1577), baptised at Lockington, 12 January 1577/8; married, 7 February 1597/8 at Lockington, John Lawe (d. 1636) of Wigston Magna and had issue;
(2.6) Sarah Bainbrigge (b. 1579), baptised at Lockington, 20 July 1579; married 1st, 15 August 1602, Rev. Henry Duckett BD (d. c.1605) of Colerne (Wilts); and 2nd, 4 February 1605/6 at Lockington, Rev. Dr. William Robinson DD (1567-1637), rector of Long Whatton (Leics) and Archdeacon of Nottingham, and had issue two sons;
(2.7) Hester Bainbrigge (b. 1580), baptised at Lockington, 14 June 1580; married, 5 April 1614 at Lockington, Philip Bainbrigge, and had issue;
(2.8) Anne Bainbrigge (b. 1581), baptised at Lockington, 13 August 1581; probably died young;
(2.9) Thomas Bainbrigge (1582-1658), baptised at Lockington, 4 September 1582; married, by 1610, Agnes, daughter of George Jackson, gent., and had issue two sons and five daughters; buried at Lockington, 5 November 1658;
(2.10) Susanna Bainbrigge (1583-1634), baptised at Lockington, 15 December 1583; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, December 1634; administration of goods granted to Robert Tyringham, March 1635;
(2.11) William Bainbrigge (b. 1586), baptised at Lockington, 27 March 1586; living in 1599; possibly the 'William Bainbrigge of Leicester' buried at Lockington, 16 August 1654;
(2.12) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (b. 1587), baptised at Lockington, 25 June 1587; married 1st, John Stanford and 2nd, before 1616, Robert Tyringham (fl. 1635) of Barkby (Leics) and Weston Favell (Northants), and had issue;
(2.13) Anne Bainbrigge (1588-1675?), baptised at Lockington, 14 July 1588; died unmarried; possibly the person of this name buried at Lockington, 11 December 1675.
He purchased the manor of Lockington on 1 July 1576.
He died 22 April and was buried at Lockington, 24 April 1617, where he is commemorated by a monument he erected in 1614; an inquisition post mortem was held at Leicester, 2 September 1617; his will was proved in the PCC, 4 October 1619. His first wife died before 1571. His widow was buried at Lockington, 15 April 1624.

Bainbrigge, John (1573-1643). Eldest son and heir of William Bainbrigge (c.1535-1617) and his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Charde esq. of London, baptised at Lockington, 13 December 1573. High Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1630. He married, 27 February 1597/8 at Wigston Magna (Leics), Anne (d. 1651), daughter of William Lawe of Wigston Magna, and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (b. 1599; fl. 1669), baptised at Wigston Magna, 19 November 1599; married 1st, 29 May 1621 at Lockington, John St. Andrew (d. 1625) of Gotham (Notts), by whom she had one son (who died in infancy) and three daughters; married 2nd, 6 October 1631, as his second wife, Sir John Bale (d. c.1653), kt. and 1st bt., of Carlton Curlieu, but had no further issue; living in 1669;
(2) William Bainbrigge (1605-69) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Bainbrigge (b. 1612), born 1612; died in the lifetime of her father;
(4) John Bainbrigge (b. 1616), born 1616; died in infancy.
He inherited the Lockington Hall estate from his father in 1617.
He was buried at Lockington, 19 March 1642/3; his will was proved in the PCC, 6 June 1648. His widow was buried at Lockington, 3 July 1651.

Bainbrigge, William (1605-69). Son and heir of John Bainbrigge (1573-1643) and his wife Anne, daughter of William Lawe of Wigston Magna, baptised at Wigston Magna, 1 September 1605.  High Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1648-49. He married 1st, 30 November 1623 at Gotham (Notts), Barbara (c.1606-24), daughter of William St. Andrew of Gotham; 2nd, 1626 (licence 22 June), Elizabeth (d. 1635), daughter of Gervase Pigott of Thrumpton (Notts); and 3rd, 16 November 1638 at Attenborough (Notts), Mary (d. 1649), daughter of German Ireton of Attenborough and sister of Gen. Henry Ireton, the Parliamentary commander, and had issue:
(2.1) John Bainbrigge (1628-59) (q.v.);
(2.2) Anne Bainbrigge (1632-55), baptised at Lockington, 30 January 1632/3; married, 28 July 1649 at Lockington, as his first wife, William Herrick (1624-93) of Beaumanor (Leics) and had issue three sons and one daughter; buried at Woodhouse (Leics), 6 June 1655;
(2.3) Gervase Bainbrigge (1635-73?), baptised at Lockington, 9 March 1634/5; lived at Alvaston (Derbys); married, c.1658, Catherine (1633-71), daughter of John Fulwood of Hemmington, and had issue four children, who all died in his lifetime; said to have died in 1673 and certainly dead by 1679;
(3.1) William Bainbrigge (1639-41), baptised at Lockington, 17 September 1639; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 11 February 1640/1;
(3.2) Thomas Bainbrigge (1640-59), baptised at Lockington, 20 August 1640; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 19 November 1659;
(3.3) Jane Bainbrigge (fl. 1658-92); married, 1 June 1658 at St James, Clerkenwell (Middx), Simon Dyott (1622-82) of St Giles-in-the-Fields, London, and had issue;
(3.4) William Bainbrigge (c.1644-79) [see below, Bainbrigge family of Woodseat Hall]
(3.5) Catherine Bainbrigge (1648-1705), baptised at Lockington, 11 April 1648; married 1st, 1670 (settlement 1 October), William Leake (d. 1687) of Wymeswold, serjeant-at-law, and 2nd, 1690 (licence 15 April), Sir William Yorke MP (c.1646-c.1702); will proved 5 September 1705;
(3.6) Henry Bainbrigge (1649-1700) of Hugglescote Grange (Leics), baptised at Lockington, 9 June 1649; married 1st, Hannah, daughter of William Welby of Denton (Lincs) and 2nd, 7 July 1681 in London, Elizabeth (fl. 1705), daughter of James Nelthorpe of London, merchant, and had issue; buried at Wymeswold, 19 December 1700.
He inherited the Lockington Hall estate from his father in 1642/3, but lived chiefly in St Giles-in-the-Fields, London.
He was buried at Lockington, 26 November 1669, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved in the PCC, 12 February 1669/70. His first wife was buried at Lockington, 5 April 1624. His second wife was buried at Lockington, 20 March 1634/5. His third wife was buried at Lockington, 9 July 1649.

Bainbrigge, John (1628-59). Elder son of William Bainbrigge (d. 1669) and his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Gervase Pigott of Thrumpton (Notts), baptised at Lockington, 22 January 1628/9. He married, 14 July 1649 at Breedon-on-the-Hill (Leics), Dorothy Gray of Langley, and had issue:
(1) William Bainbrigge (1650-53), baptised at Lockington, 17 September 1650; died young and was buried at Lockington, 4 May 1653;
(2) Dorothy Bainbrigge (b. 1652), baptised at Lockington, 27 June 1652; living in 1669;
(3) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1655-90), born 21 January and baptised at Lockington, 29 January 1654/5; married, 1672 (licence 8 July) at Belton (Leics), John Hawford (c.1644-1700), of Clement's Inn, London; buried at Kegworth (Leics), 27 February 1689/90;
(4) Anne Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1656), born 31 March and baptised at Lockington, 6 April 1656; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 13 October 1656;
(5) John Bainbrigge (1658-1717) (q.v.).
He was buried 27 January 1658/9. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Bainbrigge, John (1658-1717). Only surviving son of John Bainbrigge (1628-59) and his wife Dorothy Gray of Langley, born 13 March 1657/8 and baptised at Lockington 21 or 22 March 1658. High Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1699-1700. He married, 8 November 1683 at Osgathorpe (Leics), Mary (1668-1724), daughter and heiress of Thomas Harley of Osgathorpe, and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (b. 1684), baptised at Lockington, 25 November 1684; married, 13 August 1712 at South Wingfield (Derbys), Edward Lowe (fl. 1736) of Haslewood (Derbys), gent.;
(2) William Bainbrigge (1686-1736) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Bainbrigge (1688-1769), baptised at Lockington, 5 September 1688; married William Osborne of Derby, gent.; died 26 June 1749 and was buried at Lockington;
(4) Rev. John Bainbrigge (c.1690-1758), born about 1690; educated at Hart Hall, Oxford (matriculated 1707; BA 1711; MA 1713/4; ordained deacon and priest, 1729; rector of Walton-on-the-Wolds (Leics), 1729-58; married, 1740 (licence 14 April), Hannah Buck (b. c.1710), but had no issue; died 29 May 1758.
He inherited the Lockington Hall estate from his grandfather in 1669 and came of age in 1679. He rebuilt the Hall in about 1688.
He died 1 October and was buried at Lockington, 3 October 1717; his will was proved at Leicester, 27 March 1718. His widow died at Nottingham, 4 June 1724, and was buried at Osgathorpe, where she is commemorated by a monument.

Bainbrigge, William (1686-1736). Elder son of John Bainbrigge (1658-1717) and his wife Mary, daughter and heiress of Thomas Harley of Osgathorpe (Leics), baptised at Lockington, 23 May 1686. Educated at Magdalen College, Oxford (matriculated 1703). High Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1732-33. He married, 23 September 1712 at Woodborough (Notts), Mary (1693-1785), daughter of Philip Lacock, and had issue:
(1) Mary Bainbrigge (1714-79), baptised at Woodborough, 23 February 1714; inherited Lockington Hall jointly with her sister on the death of her brother in 1769; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 26 April 1779, where she is commemorated by a monument by Streeton of Nottingham;
(2) Philip Bainbrigge (1715-17), baptised at Woodborough, 20 September 1715; died young and was buried at Woodborough, 9 March 1716/7;
(3) Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1716-97)born 8 April and baptised at Woodborough, 28 November 1716; inherited Lockington Hall jointly with her sister on the death of her brother in 1769 and Woodborough Hall from her mother in 1785; noted for her charitable works; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 20 October 1797; will proved at York, 30 December 1797;
(4) John Bainbrigge (1718-36), baptised at Woodborough, 8 May 1718; died unmarried and without issue, and was buried at Lockington, 5 December 1736;
(5) Philip Harley Bainbrigge (1719-69) (q.v.);
(6) William Bainbrigge (1722-37), baptised at Woodborough, 22 May 1722; died young, and was buried at Woodborough, 5 July 1737;
(7) Ann Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1723), baptised at Woodborough, 17 July 1723; died in infancy and was buried at Woodborough, 18 July 1723;
(8) Dorothy Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1724), baptised at Woodborough, 7 October 1724; died in infancy and was buried at Woodborough, 24 December 1724;
(9) Charles Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1725), baptised at Woodborough, 26 October 1725; died in infancy and was buried at Woodborough, 2 November 1725;
(10) Edward Bainbrigge (1727-41), baptised at Woodborough, 18 July 1727; died young and was buried at Lockington, 5 December 1741;
(11) Margaret Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1728), baptised at Woodborough, 27 August 1728; died in infancy and was buried at Woodborough, 19 September 1728;
(12) Charles Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1731), baptised at Woodborough, 25 September 1731; died in infancy and was buried at Woodborough, 16 October 1731.
He inherited Lockington Hall from his father in 1717. His wife inherited a half share in the Woodborough Hall estate from her father in 1721 and she and her husband appear to have bought out her co-heirs. After her husband's death the Lockington estate passed to his eldest surviving sons in turn and then to his two surviving daughters, Mary and Elizabeth. Woodborough passed to his widow for life and then to his last surviving daughter, Elizabeth.
He was buried at Lockington, 13 October 1736; his will was proved in the PCC, 13 September 1737. His widow died aged 92 and was buried 14 April 1785 at Lockington, where she is commemorated by a monument.

Bainbrigge, Philip Harley (1719-69). Second surviving son of William Bainbrigge (1686-1736) and his wife Mary, daughter of Philip Lacock of Woodborough Hall (Notts), baptised at Woodborough, 30 December 1719. He and his wife were painted by Thomas Wright of Derby. High Sheriff of Leicestershire, 1749. According to his monument, 'he spent his time chiefly in the agreeable amusement the country afforded; not chusing to be much conversant with the busy world'. He married, 3 June 1746 at Colston Bassett (Notts), Catherine Allcock (d. 1775?), but had no issue.
He inherited the Lockington Hall estate from his elder brother in 1736 and Over Hall, Lockington from his cousin, Edward Brett Bainbrigge, in 1741. At his death, his property passed to his two surviving sisters, the younger of whom bequeathed it in 1797 to her maternal cousin, the Rev. Philip Story.
He died aged 49 on 27 July and was buried at Lockington, 1 August 1769, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved in the PCC, 7 September 1769. His widow may be the person of that name buried at St George, Bloomsbury (Middx), 30 May 1775.



Bainbrigge family of Woodseat Hall



Bainbrigge, William (c.1644-79) of Over Hall. Third son of William Bainbrigge (d. 1669) and his third wife, Mary, daughter of German Ireton of Atteborough, born about 1644. He married, 21 June 1665 at Osmaston (Derbys), Barbara (d. 1715), second daughter of Sir Nicholas Wilmot of Osmaston, and had issue:
(1) William Bainbrigge (1667-1706) (q.v.);
(2) Dorothy Bainbrigge (1669-1707), born 16 July and baptised at Lockington, 21 July 1669; married, 2 January 1700/1 at St Alkmund, Derby, Dr. John Hope MD (d. 1710) of Derby, and had issue two sons and two daughters; died 21 July and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 24 July 1707, where she is commemorated on her husband's monument;
(3) Barbara Bainbrigge (b. 1672), born 24 March 1671/2 and baptised at Lockington, 4 April 1672; married, 1694 (licence 4 May), Samuel Davison of Brand (Shropshire), and had issue; living in 1712;
(4) Wilmot Bainbrigge (1673-1712), born 25 June and baptised at Lockington, 4 July 1673; died unmarried and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 13 February 1712; will proved in the PCC, 7 May 1713;
(5) Nicholas Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1674), born 20 November and baptised at Lockington, 2 December 1674; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 12 December 1676;
(6) Mary Bainbridgge (1676-96), baptised at Lockington, 29 March 1676; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 2 May 1696;
(7) John Bainbrigge (1677-1717), born 2 July and baptised at Lockington, 10 July 1677; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 3 October 1717;
(8) Thomas Bainbrigge (1678-1746) (q.v.).
He inherited Over Hall, Lockington and the manors of Kegworth and Long Clawson in Leicestershire and Sutton Bonnington and Little Leake in Nottinghamshire from his father, and purchased an estate at Rocester (Staffs) in 1674 from the heirs of Bryan, Viscount Cullen. At his death he left Over Hall to his elder son and the Rocester property to his younger son.
He died 27 December and was buried at Lockington, 30 December 1679; his will was proved in the PCC, 28 June 1680. His wife died in Derby and was buried at Lockington, 4 July 1715.

Bainbrigge, William (1667-1706), of Over Hall. Elder son of William Bainbrigge (c.1644-79) and his wife Barbara, second daughter of Sir Nicholas Wilmot of Osmaston (Derbys), born 5 September and baptised at Osmaston, 10 September 1667. Educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford (matriculated 1685). He married Martha (d. 1717), daughter and heiress of Edward Brett of Dymsdale Hall (Staffs), and had issue:
(1) William Bainbrigge (1688-1707), baptised at Lockington, 19 April 1688; died unmarried, 10 September and was buried at Lockington, 12 September 1707;
(2) Jane Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1689), baptised at Lockington, 10 September 1689; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington 11 September 1689;
(3) Martha Bainbrigge (b. 1691), baptised at Lockington, 7 April 1691;
(4) Barbara Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1692), baptised at Lockington, 13 February 1692; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 21 February 1692;
(5) Dorothy Bainbrigge (1695-1727), baptised at Lockington, 6 June 1695; married, 13 October 1721 at Wolstanton (Staffs), John Gilbert (later Cooper) (d. 1773?) of Locko Park (Derbys) and Thurgarton Priory (Notts), and had issue three sons and two daughters; died 22 October 1727;
(6) Mary Bainbrigge (d. 1696); died young and was buried at Lockington, 2 May 1696;
(7) Honora Bainbrigge (b. & d. 1697), born 15 August and baptised at Lockington, 17 August 1697; died in infancy and was buried at Lockington, 25 September 1697;
(8) Jane Bainbrigge (b. 1701), baptised at Lockington, 15 December 1701;
(9) Barbara Bainbrigge (b. 1703), baptised at Lockington, 23 May 1703; married, 7 April 1720 at St Anne & St Agnes, Aldersgate, London, as his second wife, Maj. Richard Basset (b. 1690) of Beaupré Castle (Glam.);
(10) Edward Brett Bainbrigge (1704-41) (q.v.).
He inherited Over Hall, Lockington, from his father in 1679.
He died 14 August and was buried 17 August 1706; administration of his goods was granted to his widow, 5 September 1706. His widow died at Derby and was buried at Lockington, 16 October 1717.

Bainbrigge, Edward Brett (1704-41), of Over Hall. Younger son of William Bainbrigge (1667-1706) and his wife Martha, daughter and heiress of Edward Brett of Dymsdale Hall (Staffs), baptised at Lockington, 1 September 1704. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Over Hall, Lockington from his father in 1706 and came of age in 1725. At his death the estate passed to his cousin, Philip Harley Bainbrigge of Lockington Hall.
He died in the Isle of Wight and was buried at Lockington, 5 December 1741.

Bainbrigge, Thomas (1678-1746). Younger son of William Bainbrigge (c.1644-79) and his wife Barbara, second daughter of Sir Nicholas Wilmot of Osmaston (Derbys), born 29 January and baptised at Lockington, 1 March 1678. He married, c.1710, Katherine (1690-c.1752), daughter of Benjamin Parker esq. (and first cousin to the Earl of Macclesfield), and had issue:
(1) Thomas Bainbrigge (1714-15?), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 5 July 1714; possibly the person of his name buried at Elvaston, 19 February 1714/5;
(2) Barbara Bainbrigge (1715-87), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 6 August 1715; married, 23 May 1743, John Borrow (1710-80) of Castlefields (Derbys), but had no issue; died 9 August 1787.
(3) William Bainbrigge (1716-36), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 22 August 1716; died unmarried and was buried at Lockington, 17 October 1736;
(4) Thomas Bainbrigge (1718-98) (q.v.);
(4) Katherine Bainbrigge (1724-72), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 3 December 1724; married, 15 August 1749 at Duffield (Derbys), Henry Basset (b. 1730?) of Beaupré, son of Maj. Richard Basset of Beaupré, and had issue six sons and one daughter; died 30 October 1772.
He inherited an estate at Rocester from his father in 1706, but lived in Derby.
He died 29 August 1746 and was buried at All Saints, Derby; his will was proved at Lichfield, 14 October 1746. His widow died on 12 or 13 April 1752; her will was proved at Lichfield, 14 April 1752.

Bainbrigge, Thomas (1718-98). Only surviving son of Thomas Bainbrigge (1678-1746) and his wife Katherine, daughter of Benjamin Parker esq., baptised at St Werburgh, Derby, 22 March 1718. High Sheriff of Derbyshire, 1760-61. JP for Derbyshire. He married, 26 December 1749 at St Werburgh, Derby, Anne (1716-92), daughter of Isaac Borrow esq. of Castlefields (Derbys), and had issue:
(1) Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818) (q.v.);
(2) Joseph Bainbrigge (1752-1842) (q.v.);
(3) John Bainbrigge (1753-1824), of Hales Green (Derbys), baptised at St Alkmund, Derby, 18 April 1754; an officer in the Derbyshire militia (Capt.); granted the freedom of the City of London, 1778; died, aged 71, in 1824;
(4) Anne Bainbrigge (1755-1845), born 23 May and baptised at St Alkmund, Derby. 20 June 1755; married, 6 November 1781 at Rocester, Rev. Samuel James (c.1755-1813), vicar of Radstock (Somerset), and had issue four sons and two daughters; died in Islington (Middx), 6 April 1845 and was buried at Kensal Green (Middx), 12 April 1845;
(5) Lt-Col. Philip Bainbrigge (1756-99) (q.v.);
(6) Mary Bainbrigge (1761-64), baptised at Derby, 12 September 1761; died young and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 29 January 1764.
He inherited an estate at Rocester from his father in 1746. In 1776 he built the house known as Woodseat Hall and in 1778 he bought the manor of Rocester.
He was buried at Rocester, 10 November 1798. His wife was buried at Rocester, 6 December 1792.

Bainbrigge, Thomas (1751-1818). Eldest son of Thomas Bainbrigge (1718-98) and his wife Anne, daughter of Isaac Borrow of Castlefields (Derbys), born 8 August and baptised at All Saints, Derby, 7 September 1751. Educated at Derby; admitted to St John's College, Cambridge, 1769, but did not matriculate. As a young man he is said to have proposed marriage to an Earl's daughter and been accepted, but his father refused to agree to the terms proposed for the marriage settlement and broke off the engagement. The lady dying shortly afterwards, his grief and bitterness was so intense that he angrily withdrew from society altogether, and took a mistress, Elizabeth Parker, who acted as his housekeeper (she was later dismissed after conceiving another man's illegitimate child). In private, his person became unclean and unkempt, his dress that of a vagrant, his speech and manners crude, and his temper violent and erratic. It was noted that alcohol did not make him drunk, but increased the violence of his temper. On formal social occasions, however, he could still adopt the dress and manners usual for those of his rank, and he served his turn as High Sheriff of Staffordshire, 1801. His eccentricities became more marked over time, and especially after he was thrown from his horse and landed on his head at Derby Races in 1815. He was unmarried but had an illegitimate daughter by Elizabeth Parker:
(X1) Betsy Bainbrigge (b. 1790) (q.v.). 
He inherited the Woodseat Hall estate from his father in 1798. In 1815 he moved to Derby, and by the time he returned to Woodseat in 1818 the house had broken windows and was overrun with rats. At his death he bequeathed it to his illegitimate granddaughter, Mary Anne, for life, with remainder to her children. His final will left his daughter's legitimate children as the next heirs, but an earlier will had preferred his brothers' children. After Mary Anne died in 1838, his nephew, Thomas Parker Bainbrigge mounted a legal challenge to the final will, seeking to have it set aside on grounds of lunacy or fraud, thereby stimulating a legal battle which lasted for years. In 1851 a compromise was reached by which T.P. Bainbrigge secured the estate in return for a payment of £25,000 to the eldest son of Mrs. Arnold; but attempts to have this set aside on the grounds of new evidence continued until 1860.
He died 20 June 1818 and was said in later legal proceedings to have been buried in Leicester; his will was proved in the PCC, 18 March 1819.

Bainbrigge, Betsy (b. 1790). Illegitimate daughter of Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818) and his housekeeper, Elizabeth Palmer, born September 1790. Educated and acknowledged by her father until she married without his consent, and was then banished from his house and excluded from his will. She married, in 1812, William Arnold, farmer, and had issue:
(1) William Arnold (later Bainbrigge) (1813-79), baptised at Rocester, 1 January 1814; solicitor; took the additional name Bainbrigge on succeeding to his grandfather's estate in 1845; educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1847; called to bar, 1850); later of Draycott Lodge, Hanbury (Staffs) and St. Omer (France); married, 26 April 1855 at St George, Hanover Square, London, Sarah (b. c.1828), daughter of Uriah Prince, farmer, of Rocester, and had issue; accidentally killed in a traffic accident in Shoreditch (Middx), 3 February 1879; administration of goods granted 23 December 1879 (effects £113);
(2) Henry John Arnold (fl. 1857); cheese factor, hop and seed merchant at Uttoxeter (Staffs); bankrupted, with his uncle and partner Henry Arnold, in 1857;
(3) Thomas Arnold (b. 1815; fl. 1850), baptised at Rocester, 18 June 1815; bankrupted in 1845;
(4) Mary Arnold (1817-73?), baptised at Rocester, 12 October 1817; married, 28 December 1847 at St Pancras (Middx), William David Williams (1806-78), animal portrait artist, son of Thomas Williams, auctioneer, and had issue three sons and seven daughters; perhaps died in Stourbridge (Worcs), Oct-Dec 1873;
(5) Harriet Arnold (c.1820-86); married, 7 June 1847 at St Peter, Pimlico, Westminster (Middx), George Remington (b. 1821), civil engineer, and had issue one son and two daughters; died Jan-Mar 1886;
(6) John Arnold (b. 1822), baptised at Rocester, 30 July 1822; perhaps died young.
She also had, as a result of a liaison with her father's coachman before her marriage:
(X1) Mary Anne Bainbrigge (1809-38) (q.v.).
Her date of death is unknown. Her husband's date of death is unknown.

Bainbrigge, Mary Anne (1809-38). Illegitimate daughter of Betsy Bainbrigge (b. 1790) and her father's coachman, born 3 February 1809. She was brought up by her grandfather, and had no contact with her mother after the latter's marriage in 1812. When her grandfather declined into eccentricity in his final years, she was taught in some measure to share his way of life. After his death she was in the care of trustees including the wife of her grandfather's solicitor. She eloped and married, 17 June 1825 at Gretna Green (sep. January 1838), George Alsop (d. 1848), the son of an apothecary from Uttoxeter, who took the name Alsop Bainbrigge in accordance with her grandfather's will, and had issue:
(1) Thomas Alsop Bainbrigge (1830-43), born May 1830; educated at Dilhorne Free Grammar School (Staffs) and Repton School; died young, 30 September 1843;
(2) A daughter (d. 1845); died 14 July 1845. 
She was the principal beneficiary of the trust established by her grandfather's final will and also by his former will of 1815. After her death, however, her father's legitimate nephews challenged his final will, which left the property, in default of Marianne's heirs, to Betsy's legitimate children, and sought to have it set aside in favour of an earlier will of 1815 that left the property to Thomas Parker Bainbrigge. They obtained a judgement at the Assizes in their favour in 1850, but legal disputes continued until 1860. Most of the value of the estate apparently went to paying the lawyers' bills on both sides!
She died of measles, 27 January 1838. Her husband died Jan-Mar 1848.

Bainbrigge, Joseph (1752-1842). Second son of Thomas Bainbrigge (1718-98) and his wife Anne, daughter of Isaac Borrow of Castlefields (Derbys), born 7 February and baptised at St Alkmund, Derby, 27 October 1752. He was admitted to St John's College, Cambridge in 1771 but did not matriculate or go into residence. An officer in the King's Own Staffordshire Militia (Capt.). He married 1st, 22 May 1777 at Wirksworth (Derbys), his cousin, Honor (1753-78), daughter of Philip Gell MD of Wirksworth (Derbys) and 2nd, 24 September 1789 at Ashbourne (Derbys), Hannah (1770-1841), daughter of Joseph Harrison of Yieldersley (Derbys), and had issue:
(2.1) Thomas Parker Bainbrigge (1791-1870) (q.v.); 
(2.2) Joseph Hankey Bainbrigge (1793-1825), born at Oak Hill, Checkley (Staffs), 26 October 1793 and baptised at Ashbourne, 16 February 1795; surgeon at Derby Royal Infirmary, c.1820-25; died unmarried and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 26 October 1825; will proved 28 July 1830;
(2.3) Honor Gell Bainbrigge (c.1798-1821), born about 1798; died unmarried, 1 June and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 6 June 1821;
(2.4) Anne Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1800-83), baptised at Ashbourne, 25 October 1800; died unmarried, 7 April, and was buried at Ulceby (Lincs), 11 April 1883;
(2.5) Mary Reynolds Bainbrigge (1802-03); baptised at Ashbourne, 29 December 1802; died in infancy and was buried at Rocester, 23 February 1803;
(2.6) William Henry Bainbrigge (1805-84), born 6 December 1805 and baptised at Ashbourne, 15 January 1806; surgeon (MRCS) in Liverpool and later proprietor of the Saline Baths, Droitwich (Worcs); married 1st, 26 April 1838 at Walton-on-the-Hill (Lancs), Martha Maria (1809-44), daughter of William Thomson of Liverpool, merchant, and had issue three sons and one daughter; married 2nd, 5 June 1851 at Walton-on-the-Hill, Emma Frances (1821-1913), second daughter of Joseph Yates of Liverpool, and had issue two sons and one daughter; died 6 May 1884; adminstration of goods granted 1 July 1915 (effects £6,750);
(2.7) Jane Maria Bainbrigge (1807-76), baptised at Ashbourne, 23 December 1807; married, 31 December 1835 at St Alkmund, Derby, Rev. William Fletcher (1810-90), headmaster successively of Derby, Southwell and Wimborne Grammar Schools and vicar of Ulceby (Lincs), 1875-90, and had issue three sons and four daughters; died 11 April and was buried at Ulceby, 15 April 1876;
(2.8) Mary Barbara Bainbrigge (1809-92), baptised at Ashbourne, 17 November 1809; married, 20 December 1838, William Dixon esq., JP, of Liverpool and of Acton House, Wrexham (Flints); died at Rhyl (Flints), 21 March 1892;
(2.9) Catherine Amelia Bainbrigge (1812-32), born about December 1812 and baptised at Norbury (Derbys), 17 January 1813; died unmarried, 1 August, and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 6 August 1832.
He rented St. Alkmund's Vicarage in Derby for some years. He was the heir-at-law of his brother, Thomas Bainbrigge, and thus the person most disadvantaged by Thomas' bequest of his estates to his illegitimate descendants. In 1820 he purchased Copes Hill House, Derby from the trustees of his brother's estate, and was prevailed upon to give a confirmation of his brother's will.
He died 28 January 1842 and was buried at Rocester. His first wife was buried at Rocester, 3 July 1778. His second wife died 21 April and was buried at St Alkmund, Derby, 25 April 1841.

Bainbrigge, Thomas Parker (1791-1870). Eldest son of Joseph Bainbrigge (1752-1842) and his second wife, Hannah, daughter of Joseph Harrison of Yieldersley (Derbys), baptised at Checkley (Staffs), 6 March 1791. Educated at Repton School. An officer in the Infantry (Ensign, 1807; Lt., 1810; retired on half-pay, 1823), who served in India in the third Mahratta and Nepal wars. Subsequently Postmaster of Derby, c.1829-55. JP for Derbyshire. He married 1st, 3 June 1820 at Cawnpore (India), Eliza (c.1801-24), youngest daughter of Lt-Gen. Sir Dyson Marshall, kt., and 2nd, 11 May 1830 at Beccles (Suffk), Lorina Anne (1802-79), daughter of Charles Dashwood, surgeon, of Beccles (Suffk), but had no issue.
He lived at Mill Hill House, Derby, and later at Copes Hill, Derby. After the death of Mary Anne Alsop Bainbrigge (q.v.) in 1838, he began disputing the will of his uncle, Thomas Bainbrigge (1751-1818), and in 1851 secured possession of the Woodseat estate by a compromise under which he paid £25,000 to Betsy Arnold's son, William Arnold Bainbrigge. There were further legal actions until 1860 and after the last of these was settled he sold the estate in 1862 to Colin Minton Campbell.
He died 23 May and was buried at St. Alkmund, Derby, 30 May 1870; his will was proved 27 June 1870 (effects under £3,000). His first wife died 3 May and was buried at St. Alkmund, Derby, 10 May 1824, where she is commemorated by a monument. His widow died in Lowestoft (Suffk), 21 June 1879; her will was proved 14 July 1879 (effects under £5,000).

Bainbrigge, Lt-Col. Philip (1756-99). Youngest son of Thomas Bainbrigge (1718-98) and his wife Anne, daughter of Isaac Borrow of Castlefields (Derbys), baptised at St Alkmund, Derby, 16 August 1756. An officer in the Infantry (Ensign, 1776; Lt., 1778; Capt. by 1790; Maj., 1795; Br. Lt-Col., 1799); his final posting being command of the 20th Foot. He married, 19 March 1781, Rachel (1764-1842), daughter of Peter Dobrée of Beauregard (Guernsey) and had issue:
(1) Ann Bainbrigge (b. 1782), born 1782; died young before 1797;
(2) Harriet Bainbrigge (1783-1836); married, 23 December 1811 at Walthamstow (Essex), Maj. Robert Dale of 93rd Regt.; died in Derby, 5 April and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 12 April 1836;
(3) Honor Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1784-1838), baptised at St John, Hackney (Middx), 12 April 1784; died unmarried and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 16 April 1838;
(4) General Sir Philip Bainbrigge (1786-1862) (q.v.);
(5) Rachel Dobrée Bainbrigge (1789-1849), born 19 October and baptised at Rocester, 25 October 1789; died unmarried, 7 September 1849;
(6) Gen. John Hankey Bainbrigge CB (1791-1881) of The Rohais (Guernsey), born 5 July and baptised at Rocester, 17 July 1791; an officer in the Infantry (Ensign, 1808; Capt., 1814; Maj., 1839; Lt-Col., 1846; Col., 1854; retired as Maj-Gen., 1861; Lt-Gen., 1870; Gen., 1877), who served in the Peninsula War and lost an arm there, and later as Fort Major on Guernsey; married, 4 May 1819, his cousin Sophia (d. 1874), fifth daughter of Peter Bonamy Dobrée of Beauregard (Guernsey) and had issue four sons and one daughter; died 15 March 1881; will proved 27 April 1881 (effects under £40,000);
(7) Peter Bainbrigge (later Bainbridge-Le Hunt) (1793-1866), of Ashbourne (Derbys), baptised at Rocester, 5 May 1793; articled clerk to William Chislett of Frome (Somerset), attorney, 1810; solicitor; JP for Staffs and Derbys and DL for Derbyshire; assumed the additional name of Le Hunt by royal sign manual, 1832, on inheriting an estate at Burgh (Lincs) from that family; had antiquarian interests; died unmarried, 26 October, and was buried at Ashbourne, 2 November 1866; will proved 20 November 1866 (effects under £25,000);
(8) Thomas Bainbrigge (1795-1844), baptised at Rocester, 5 July 1795; an officer in the 57th Regt. (Ensign, 1815; Lt., 1823; Capt., 1835); married, 9 October 1826 at St James, Sydney (Australia), Sarah (1809-81), daughter of Samuel Bate of Hobart, Tasmania (Australia), and had issue one son and five daughters; died at sea off the coast of India, May 1844; will proved 18 October 1844;
(9) Ann Bainbrigge (1797-1815), baptised at Ashbourne, 8 December 1797; married, 31 October 1815 at Ashbourne, Samuel Dobrée (1793-1862) (who m2, 11 August 1824, Jane Mary Priaulx), son of Samuel Dobrée; died a few weeks later at Walthamstow, 26 December 1815.
He lived at Ashbourne (Derbys).
He was killed commanding 20th Foot at battle of Egmont-op-Zee (Holland), 6 October 1799; his will was proved 4 February 1800. His widow died 4 May 1842.


Sir Philip Bainbrigge. Image: NPG
Bainbrigge, Gen. Sir Philip (1786-1862), kt. Eldest son of Lt-Col. Philip Bainbrigge (1756-99) and his wife Rachel, daughter of Peter Dobrée of Beauregard (Guernsey), born 4 February and baptised at St Andrew, Holborn (Middx), 3 March 1786. Educated at Lichfield, Ashburn School, Gray's Military School, Deptford and the military college, High Wycombe. He entered the Royal Navy as a midshipman in 1799, but on the death of his father, the Duke of York gave him a commission in the Army (Ensign, 1800; Lt., 1803; Capt., 1805; Maj., 1812; Lt-Col., 1827; Col., 1837; Maj-Gen., 1846; Lt-Gen, 1854) and he served in West Indies, 1805-08; studied at the Royal Military Academy, 1808 and qualified for the staff; joined the Quartermaster General's Dept., serving with distinction in the Peninsular War and later in Ireland and Ceylon; Deputy Quartermaster General, 1841. He was appointed CB, 1837 and KCB, 1860, and was made Hon. Col. of 26th Foot, 1854. JP for Co. Donegal, 1834. He married, 5 April 1816 at St Anne, Liverpool (Lancs), Sarah Mary (1796-1870), daughter of Joseph Fletcher of Liverpool and had issue:
(1) Maj-Gen. Philip John Bainbrigge (1817-81) (q.v.);
(2) Arthur Bainbrigge (1818-25), born 11 April and baptised at St Mary, Lichfield, 6 May 1818; died young, 4 June, and was buried at St George, Liverpool, 6 June 1825;
(3) Ann Dobrée Bainbrigge (1819-87), born 26 October 1819 and baptised at Pontefract (Yorks WR), 14 July 1820; married, 7 June 1853 at Kandy (Sri Lanka), Col. Franklin Lushington CB (1811-90), fifth son of Sir Henry Lushington, 2nd bt., and had issue one daughter (who died unmarried); died 17 December and was buried at Torquay Cemetery (Devon), 21 December 1887;
(4) Honora Bainbrigge (1821-36), born 25 May and baptised at Pontefract, 16 November 1821; died young, 29 March 1836 and was buried at Cork (Co. Cork);
(5) Rev. Joseph Henry Bainbrigge (1823-96), born 20 July and baptised at St Ann, Belfast, 31 December 1823; educated at Wadham College, Oxford (matriculated 1841; BA 1845); ordained deacon, 1851 and priest, 1852; curate of Stanton in Ellaston (Staffs), 1851-54, Yoxall (Staffs), 1854-63, Overseal (Derbys), 1864-65 and Upton Warren (Worcs), 1866-70; vicar of Finstall (Worcs), 1869-96; married, 4 November 1863 at Felton (Herefs), Eliza Emily (1822-1902), third daughter and co-heir of Col. Thomas Henry Bund of Wick House (Worcs), but had no issue; buried at St Matthias, Malvern (Worcs), 14 December 1896; administration of goods granted 17 March 1897 (effects £26,420);
(6) Harriet Emma Bainbrigge (1825-1915), born 22 September 1825 and baptised at Stonehouse (Devon), 7 January 1826; married 11 January 1849 at St Anne, Belfast (Co. Antrim), Lt. Henry Dawson (1820-54) of 6th Dragoon Guards, son of Rev. Henry Dawson, rector of Hopton (Norfk), and had issue two sons; died at Dymoke House, Easton (Hants), 8 February 1915; will proved 18 May 1915 (estate £9,196);
(7) Rachel Elizabeth Bainbrigge (1828-1912), born 1 February and baptised at Stonehouse, 26 June 1828; married, 27 August 1856 at Titchfield (Hants), Maj. Francis Powell Hopkins (1828-1913) of Westward Ho! (Devon) and had issue six children; died 6 June 1912; will proved 18 June 1912 (effects £74);
(8) Edward Bainbrigge (1829-55), born 20 December 1829 and baptised at Stonehouse, 6 March 1830; an officer in the Royal Engineers (2nd Lt., 1847; Lt., 1849); killed at the Battle of Sebastopol in the Crimea, 4 April 1855; commemorated by a monument at Ashbourne (Derbys);
(9) Col. Arthur Bainbrigge (1832-1923), born 7 July and baptised at Armagh Cathedral, 25 July 1832; an officer in the 13th Light Infantry (Ensign, 1850; Lt., 1853; Capt., 1855; Maj., 1867; Lt-Col., 1875; retired as Col., 1878); married, 4 October 1866 at St Mary, Bryanston Sq., London, Lucy Jane, daughter of Ellis Reeve of Montagu Sq., London, but had no issue; died Jul-Sep 1923;
(10) Sarah Mary Bainbrigge (1835-1917), born 10 June and baptised at Shandon (Co. Cork), 23 July 1835; married, 24 January 1855 at Colombo (Ceylon), George Christian (1825-1903) of Bighton Wood, Alresford (Hants), second son of Samuel Christian of Palazzo Cottoner (Malta) and had issue ten children; died 20 April 1917; will proved 17 May 1917 (estate £20,145);
(11) Eleanor Catherine Bainbrigge (1837-44), born 20 July and baptised at Cork, 25 August 1837; died young, 30 November 1844, and was buried at Ring's End Church, Dublin, 4 December 1844.
He died 20 December and was buried at Titchfield (Hants), 27 December 1862; his will proved 8 January 1863 (effects under £6,000). His widow died 26 June 1870; administration of her goods was granted 12 October 1870 (effects under £2,000).

Bainbrigge, Maj-Gen. Philip (1817-81). Eldest son of Gen. Sir Philip Bainbrigge (1786-1862), kt. and his wife Sarah Mary, daughter of Joseph Fletcher of Liverpool, born 16 January and baptised at St Mary, Lichfield (Staffs), 8 April 1817. Educated at Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (Cadet, 1830). An officer in the Royal Engineers (Lt., 1833; Capt., 1846; Lt-Col., 1856; Col., 1861; retired as Maj-Gen., 1862); he served in Canada, 1835-42; Professor of Fortification at Royal Military Academy, 1854-62; Assistant Boundary Commissioner, 1867. In retirement he devoted himself to charitable works among the poor of the Greenwich district, and to the establishment of a workshop for the employment of the blind in Kent. He married, 18 August 1846 at Woolwich (Kent), Margaret Jane (1822-99), daughter of Maj-Gen. Thomas Paterson RA, and had issue:
(1) Rev. Philip Thomas Bainbrigge (1848-1919) (q.v.);
(2) Marion Sophia Bainbrigge (1849-1928), born 17 December 1849 and baptised at Woolwich, 6 February 1850; died unmarried, 11 December 1928; will proved 23 January 1929 (estate £3,949);
(3) Edith Mary Bainbrigge (1852-1932), born 29 April and baptised at Woolwich, 30 June 1852; died unmarried, 19 June 1932; will proved 16 August 1932 (estate £4,229);
(4) Alice Greta Bainbrigge (1854-1933), born 4 January and baptised at Woolwich, 18 February 1854; married, 7 June 1882 at Christ Church, Greenwich (Kent), James Edward Anderson (1849-1922) of Liverpool, son of Thomas Anderson, East India merchant, and had issue one son and two daughters; died 30 June 1933; will proved 10 October 1933 (estate £2,559);
(5) Lorina Grace (1856-1938), born 2 December 1856 and baptised at Woolwich, 15 April 1857; died unmarried, 9 October 1938; will proved 22 November 1938 (estate £8,080).
He lived at 10 Vanbrugh Park Road, Greenwich (Kent).
He died 23 October, and was buried in Charlton Cemetery (Kent), 28 October 1881; his will was proved 30 November 1881 (effects £9,743). His widow died 26 November 1899; administration of her goods was granted to her son, 22 December 1899 (estate £148).

Bainbrigge, Rev. Philip Thomas (1848-1919). Only son of Maj-Gen. Philip Bainbrigge (1817-81) and his wife Margaret Jane, daughter of Maj-Gen. Thomas Paterson, born 23 March and baptised at Woolwich (Kent), 31 May 1848. Educated at Pembroke College, Oxford (matriculated 1872; BA 1875; MA 1878). Ordained deacon, 1875 and priest, 1876. Curate of Oakham (Rutland), 1875-78, St Peter, Leicester, 1878-80 and St Thomas, Regent St., London, 1880-81; Vicar of St Philip, Regent St., London, 1881-83 and St Thomas, Regent St., 1883-1919; prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral, London. He married 1st, 8 July 1884 at St Paul, Edinburgh, Helen Jane (d. 1904), daughter of Alexander Gillespie of Biggar Park (Lanarks), and 2nd, 27 July 1905, Beatrice Eleonora (d. 1951), third daughter of Francis Borthwick, and had issue:
(1.1) Philip Gillespie Bainbrigge (1890-1918), born in Edinburgh, 19 September 1890; educated at University (MA); served with 5th Battn, Lancashire Fusiliers (2nd Lt.) in First World War and was killed in action, 18 September 1918;
(1.2) Modwyn Bainbrigge (1893-1960), born Apr-Jun 1893; died unmarried, 3 September 1960;
(2.1) Roger Bainbrigge (1909-43) (q.v.).
After his death his widow retired to Edinburgh.
He died 1 November 1919; his will was proved 7 February 1920 (estate £5,255). His first wife died 17 May 1904. His widow died 10 July 1951.

Bainbrigge, Roger (1909-43). Only son of Rev. Philip Thomas Bainbrigge (1848-1919) and his second wife, Beatrice Eleanora, third daughter of Francis Borthwick, born 23 August 1909. Educated at St. Edward's School, Oxford. Stockbroker on the London Stock Exchange. He served as an officer in the Royal Artillery and Pioneer Corps (Capt.) in the Second World War. He married 1st, 3 April 1934 at St Luke, West Holloway (Middx), Elizabeth Grace (1911-35), daughter of Rev. Charles Henry Robert Baldwin MBE, vicar of St Luke's and later rector of Chiddingfold (Surrey), and 2nd, 5 February 1937, Kathleen Mary (1914-44), daughter of Arthur Norris Risley, schoolmaster of Kensington (Middx), and had issue:
(1.1) Michael Bainbrigge (1935-97), born 6 August 1935; educated at Shrewsbury School and King's School, Chester; lived at Instow (Devon); died unmarried, 11 June 1997; will proved 31 December 1997;
(2.1) Angus Bainbrigge (b. 1938), born 28 April 1938; accountant; sold a Velazquez portrait to the National Gallery, 1967; married, 1963, Cynthia Robinson; now living.
He was killed in action in the Middle East, 24 February 1943, and was buried at Heliopolis War Cemetery, Cairo (Egypt); administration of his goods was granted 30 August 1943 (estate £1,298). His first wife died in childbirth, 7 August 1935. His second wife died 3 August 1944; her will was proved 22 January 1945.


Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1850, i, p.46; Burke's Landed Gentry, 1969, p. 26; Staffordshire Advertiser, 3 August 1850, pp. 6-7; Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Staffordshire, 1974, p. 226; Sir N. Pevsner & E. Williamson, The buildings of England: Leicestershire & Rutland, 2nd edn., 1984, p. 277; M. Craven, The Derby town house, 1987, pp. 89, 113; L. Cantor, The historic country houses of Leicestershire and Rutland, 1998, p. 50.


Location of archives


Bainbrigge family of Lockington: deeds and papers, 1437-1826 [Derbyshire Record Office, D5193]
Bainbrigge family of Woodseat: Derby estate and family papers, 1812-30 [Derbyshire Record Office, D5369/17]


Coat of arms


Argent, a fess embattled between three battleaxes sable.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Can anyone provide additional information about the ownership of Woodseat Hall between 1941 and 1974, or the circumstances under which it fell into ruin?
  • If anyone can provide portraits or photographs of the people named in bold above, or any additional genealogical information about the members of this family, I should be very pleased to hear from them.



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 10 April 2018 and was updated 19 April 2018.